Hobby Games Down 3% But RPGs Up 18%

ICv2 has produced some new industry figures which suggest that US and Canada hobby game sales dropped by 3% in the last year; however, the tabletop RPG category, which is the smallest subcategory of hobby games, increased by 18%.




icv2.jpg
Chart from iCv2


Of the hobby games category, 40% is collectible games, 45% is miniatures and board games, and 14% is card, dice and roleplaying games.

Roleplaying games rose from $55M in 2017 to $65M in 2018.

You can read more over on ICv2.
 
Russ Morrissey

Comments

Mistwell

Hero
I'll take Useless Numbers at My Table for $1000, Alex.
I thought it looked like the board from Jeopardy. I didn't expect anyone getting so uppity about it. What's your issue?
Balooney, in part. You said it looked like "useless numbers" to you. That's more than the joke about Jeopardy (though the Jeopardy joke is funny), you just look like you're backing off now on that part since bunch of people called you on it. If you call challenging your opinion as "uppity" that's fine, mark me down as uppidity. Now, can you elaborate on why you think these numbers are "useless"?
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
OK, guys. Leave him alone, please. He made a snarky reply to an article and got called on it. It's fine*. Let's get back to the actual topic.


*Though to clarify, I generally take a dim view of actual obnoxious comments directed at our freelancers or staff; this article was by me though, and the comment wasn't *too* snarky.
 

Jacob Lewis

The One with the Force
Balooney, in part. You said it looked like "useless numbers" to you. That's more than the joke about Jeopardy (though the Jeopardy joke is funny), you just look like you're backing off now on that part since bunch of people called you on it. If you call challenging your opinion as "uppity" that's fine, mark me down as uppidity. Now, can you elaborate on why you think these numbers are "useless"?
Or what? You're going to knock down my bike? Call me "chicken"? I hear "indian burns" are still making the rounds, but we can't call them that anymore. Sorry, I don't know the politically correct term because I stopped using these schoolyard tactics a long time ago.

But challenge accepted! :)

You admit you got the joke, which is what I was going for. The category was "Useless Numbers at MY Table". They never meant anything to me, and I have said as much every time it comes up. It wasn't a challenge or a slight, but there's always a "bunch of people" eager to find offense wherever they can. I've not taken those numbers or their value away from anyone else's table, did I? If I had, then you might have reason to complain. But at least I tried to make it amusing. Some people here did get it.

So if you took offense, I did mean not mean to give it. But I don't know if that matters to you, or if you're just looking to make an issue of something you imagined buried under a pretty darn good joke. That's not my problem. If you want to take offense, I'll leave you to indulge your own insecurities. I've better things to do than explain myself again to someone who picks apart posts looking for leverage. Enjoy your day! :)
 

Mistwell

Hero
Or what? You're going to knock down my bike? Call me "chicken"? I hear "indian burns" are still making the rounds, but we can't call them that anymore. Sorry, I don't know the politically correct term because I stopped using these schoolyard tactics a long time ago.

But challenge accepted! :)

You admit you got the joke, which is what I was going for. The category was "Useless Numbers at MY Table". They never meant anything to me, and I have said as much every time it comes up. It wasn't a challenge or a slight, but there's always a "bunch of people" eager to find offense wherever they can. I've not taken those numbers or their value away from anyone else's table, did I? If I had, then you might have reason to complain. But at least I tried to make it amusing. Some people here did get it.

So if you took offense, I did mean not mean to give it. But I don't know if that matters to you, or if you're just looking to make an issue of something you imagined buried under a pretty darn good joke. That's not my problem. If you want to take offense, I'll leave you to indulge your own insecurities. I've better things to do than explain myself again to someone who picks apart posts looking for leverage. Enjoy your day! :)
I didn't find offense and didn't imply I did. But thanks for that silly strawman and nice spin to pretend you're some victim of a bully who dares...ask wtf you meant? All I did was ask why you thought that - and it's been like pulling teeth to get you to elaborate. Thanks for being so unwilling to have a conversation on a community based message board and cast aspersions on anyone who does?

I'm fine letting it drop. Hope you are too...without some parting sarcasm.
 

GreyLord

Adventurer
Well, it matches the numbers I posted earlier (though it's on the lower end of 65-75) independent of what their research showed. It should not be that much of a surprise to anyone.

That's still pretty decent growth and all indications are that it will continue to grow. Surprised at some of the numbers in other categories and the drop in at least one of them.

Depending on what numbers you use, that is either less than $1.50 per player (40 million player figure), less than $5 per player (15 million player figure), or more if you guestimate less players. This could indicate that better leverage of the brand could be utilized (less than $1.50 per player means that not a ton of accessories are being bought) which means with better marketing and usage of the brand there is a HUGE potential for exponential growth. OR, with a lower number it could indicate that it's about even where each group is probably buying around one or two of the accessories per year ($5 per player) most likely. OR, if there are less players than that it could speak of an enthusiastic customer base that has many of the players buying at least one accessory per year plus a growth in regards to how many are buying rulebooks and additional rulebooks. This also could be leveraged in growth to spark even greater sales as well.

Either way, it shows strength in the D&D sections of WotC, though it shows some concern in regards to collectible games. Hobby board games seems to also be growing and with strong growth could indicate a good area of continued expansion could also be in that area of board games.

Just some thoughts on the table posted.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
Depending on what numbers you use, that is either less than $1.50 per player (40 million player figure), less than $5 per player (15 million player figure), or more if you guestimate less players..
As mentioned in the last thread, you’re conflating different figures. The 15M was North America and the 40M is was worldwide. These figures are US and Canada.
 

Joseph Nardo

Explorer
Well, it matches the numbers I posted earlier (though it's on the lower end of 65-75) independent of what their research showed. It should not be that much of a surprise to anyone.

That's still pretty decent growth and all indications are that it will continue to grow. Surprised at some of the numbers in other categories and the drop in at least one of them.

Depending on what numbers you use, that is either less than $1.50 per player (40 million player figure), less than $5 per player (15 million player figure), or more if you guestimate less players. This could indicate that better leverage of the brand could be utilized (less than $1.50 per player means that not a ton of accessories are being bought) which means with better marketing and usage of the brand there is a HUGE potential for exponential growth. OR, with a lower number it could indicate that it's about even where each group is probably buying around one or two of the accessories per year ($5 per player) most likely. OR, if there are less players than that it could speak of an enthusiastic customer base that has many of the players buying at least one accessory per year plus a growth in regards to how many are buying rulebooks and additional rulebooks. This also could be leveraged in growth to spark even greater sales as well.

Either way, it shows strength in the D&D sections of WotC, though it shows some concern in regards to collectible games. Hobby board games seems to also be growing and with strong growth could indicate a good area of continued expansion could also be in that area of board games.

Just some thoughts on the table posted.
I personally have spent over $5000 in the last 2 years. That includes dwarvenforge terrain, d&d related miniatures and 5 e books
 

cmad1977

Adventurer
Can’t say that my spending has gone up or down really. Maybe up a bit because I’m buying the occasional adventure when we run one(curse of Strahd now). But I acquire things slowly. I’ll be buying stuff for the next 5-10 years probably at the rate of 1-2 books a year.
 

Mistwell

Hero
Interesting to me is Hobby Games are now selling more than Comic Books. In fact Hobby Games (as a whole) are now sell 50% more than Comic Books for North America.

 

GreyLord

Adventurer
[MENTION=4348]GreyLord[/MENTION]

Where do we find the player numbers figures which you place at 40 million?
It's from a recent News Article.

Taking that into account, I was comparing the different numbers we have been given and relating it to the money that the industry has been making.

As Morrus stated, the different numbers relate to America (15 mil) and supposedly the world (40 mil). I utilized those for the breakdown.

Though the profits I stated previously (65 - 75 million...I don't have a source from the internet for that figure to give out though, so nothing that I can give out to back me up on this...though I suppose the chart does a little to validate the figure on the lower end) also show that they have a great possibility to increase to even higher percentages this year getting close to what TSR was making in the early 90s (not accounting for inflation).

The year thus far shows a lot of promise (it's still early) but some individuals seem to be showing that growth is continuing to grow and maybe even spike a little more.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Interesting to me is Hobby Games are now selling more than Comic Books. In fact Hobby Games (as a whole) are now sell 50% more than Comic Books for North America.
You get more bang for you buck with games. I'm not a huge comic book fan or a collector, but I enjoy the occasional series. But the price feels too high for me for what I get. I never by physical comics any more, other than compilations of a series I really enjoy--usually Web comics, like Erfworld, Order of the Stick, Camp Wedonwantcha, and Table Titans.

Most of my comic spend is no through Amazon. I'll hear about a series like Saga or Rat Queens and I'll wait until there is a compilation book.

I would buy a lot more if the price per comic were lower. I tried a Comixology subscription, but it rarely offered the properties I was most interested in and I quickly cancelled.

Similarly, while both my boys enjoy illustrated novels and comics, only a small few are re-readable enough to be worth the cost (e.g. Bones). Luckily, we have a number of libraries nearby with a good collection of illustrated novels. But that's not making much money for the industry.

Traditional comics are competing against movies, TV series, video games, and free Web comics for our attention and entertainment dollars, but they give less bang for your buck.

Not sure what the answer it. I'm a fan of the medium, but it is the rare comic series that will get me to spend my money on it versus just about any other form of entertainment.
 

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