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D&D General How Was Your Last Session?

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
Fun! Lots of fighting and sneaking about.

The party is still in the swamp lair and after searching the quarters of the lieutenants they defeated, finding a bunch of potions, a magical great axe that the barbarian was psyched to find. But they also found a secret passage that they decided to explore that actually let them avoid a bunch of encounters and get down to to the lower level and get the drop on the high priest and some of his minions. I had this fight planned out like a minor set-piece and the opponent had the ability to control the water in the chamber, flooding it to hamper party movement and allow the amphisbaena in the pool beneath the altar free reign in the chamber. However, since the party popped out from the priest's escape tunnel unexpectedly, it was a little bit of an anti-climactic fight - but there were no complaints, the party appreciated their victory and even took care of the arriving reinforcements with well-placed stinking cloud spell.

The gnome's curiosity got the better of him, causing him to crawl into a partially collapsed chamber, where he got partially crushed by rubble and nearly stuck in a giant spider's web. Thankfully, the barbarian was able to toss a rope in and pull him out by brute force (though more rubble fell and did even more damage - I think that was the only damage the gnome took all session).

Oh and at one point they found a scroll of revivify and instead of joy the general response was "Oh great! Now we know the gloves are off." :LOL:

They also freed some prisoners and agonized a bit over what to do with them. They finally directed the more martially-oriented prisoners to where they could find their confiscated gear and encouraged them to retrieve it, find a safe place for the others (including a rich merchant, a 10 year old boy whose little sister has already been fed to guard crocodiles, and a sickly teenager) and then return to help deal with the remaining threat.

In the meantime, the PCs did some (futile) searching for a big treasure room they heard about and went back up to the upper level to take out a troglodyte guard room. They tried to get the drop on these as well, but too many hissing whispers on one side of the door alerted the trogs so they reversed the ambush on the PCs. This time a well-placed entangle turned the tide and they made quick work of the trogs including a meatseeker.

We called the session there. Unfortunately, August is looking too busy for us to meet, so our next scheduled session is September 11th.

This is where the PCs (and one NPC ally) left off in terms of HPs/HD.

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Pretty good but short. There are dangers with incorporating 1 PC into the main story too much even if all players agree to the idea in session 0. 1 player who was linked to the main story could not make it meaning when the rest of the party got to the point were advancing the story would be awkward with out him we called it for the night. If you are going to make a plot around a specific blood line of one of the PCs, probably make 2 of the players family members so you can progress even when one is absent.

Other then that we had a solid combat and a bit of exploration. I have a hard time tempting my PCs with magic gear. There was a shop selling magic items made from necromancy, such as unliving leather armor and an undead insect monster turned into an acid thrower, and the only one player showed any interest in any of it. I even had a remote control mummy you could transfer your own mind into, no body was interested.
My players would have been all over that!
 

28th session of Dragon Heist/Deck of Many Things mashup. 6th level half-orc cavalier fighter, halfling swashbuckler rogue, and half-elf evoker wizard.

Two sessions ago, the wizard died in a pitched battle with the Waterdeep City Watch. The player characters cut down 12 city guards. A bad spot for the PCs and a low point in the campaign.

In this session, the PCs used an artifact called the Silver Chalice of Siamorphe to resurrect the wizard. The fighter's player narrated a really touching ritual. Then we cut to the wizard's dreamlike vision of death where he encountered his dead parents and they told him the secret reason for their murder: They were double agents working for the Blackstaff against the Arcane Brotherhood, but they were betrayed and murdered by an evil wizard and a rogue mind flayer. As life and consciousness returned, he now had new insights into his origin and a clear target for his revenge...

...and he gained a level of grave cleric, because we wanted his near-death experience to have a mechanical impact.

Meanwhile, the rogue's uncle underlined the hard truth that they were now the most wanted men in Waterdeep. They needed to find a way to clear their names, or frame someone else, or bring the dead back to life...or they'd be swinging from the end of a rope. The players had a lengthy discussion about numerous far fetched schemes and finally settled on this: They will break into the temple in the City of Dead where the City Watch they murdered are lying in state, steal the corpses, and then resurrect them.

So that's next session.

Can't wait.
 

Ogre Mage

Adventurer
It was the first session of a new campaign. We are playing The Curse of Strahd online. It was a bit disorganized as first sessions often are. But overall I thought it was a good start and am looking forward to the campaign. Town officials in Daggerford sent us out to hunt werewolves. We got lost in the mists and wound up in Ravenloft. Most of the session was spent trying to figure out where we were. There was no combat. We stumbled into Krezk and the guards would not let us in. The burgomaster in Krezk sent us out to find out what happened to their wine delivery. We were en route to the Wizard of the Wines when the session ended.

It is a pretty large party -- 7 players!

Wood Elf Circle of Spores Druid
Wood Elf Moon Druid
Human Grave Domain Cleric
Human Twilight Domain Cleric
Hill Dwarf Rune Knight Fighter
High Elf Swashbuckler Rogue
Tiefling Necromancer Wizard
 
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Since the players high tailed it to Waterdeep after the dragon cultists "celebrated" Tiamat's Day of Vengeance by slaughtering all the guests at the inn and then ran off, I think I'm going to give them the option of staying with the original plan or morphing. I am going to have Leosin give them the choice of continuing on with their quest or getting the inn from Dragon Heist as their reward and possibly morphing into Dungeon of the Mad Mage. If they choose the latter, I am going to keep bringing the dragons up, so they have the option of going back at some point.

Any ideas for merging the two? I was thinking of having them possibly try to gain allies from the underdark, since dragons are a menance in the mines, too.
 

Richards

Legend
We talked our way out of an expected fight, then found a mind flayer willing to work with us in translating some old illithid texts if we'd take out some encroaching duergar he wanted slain but was prohibited by treaty from dealing with himself. In fighting the duergar we ended up also fighting a pair of ropers as well, but we managed to handle them all fairly easily. (We're 13th level at this point in the campaign.) And we found out the reason for our dwarven fighter's 5 Intelligence: he had a portion of his memories blocked off and in getting them restored (and his Intelligence boosted up to his apparently-original 12), we reactivated his inherent psionic powers.

And, last but certainly not least, my lizardfolk PC got the sorceress PC to admit (under a zone of truth spell, no less) that toads do not always burst into flame when you try to eat them and that the fact that her toad familiar did just that when I had tried eating him months ago had been an elaborate trick using a variant of the fire shield spell. I spent a good chunk of the time in the city eating a bag of toads now that I knew it was safe to do so, not letting the fact that I was wearing a hat of disguise to look like a dwarf (so as not to frighten the mostly human population of the city) preventing me from enjoying my snacks. From the looks I got, you'd think the sight of a dwarf chewing his way through a bag of toads was unusual or something, but then that's mammals for you....

Johnathan
 

Richards

Legend
In today's "Dreams of Erthe" campaign, we went through two short adventures.

The first one was really short and sweet, as it was basically just one big encounter. The PCs were in a new dukedom and had gone to the temple of the god of wealth to convert some of their money to the local currency. (Because otherwise they charge you 20% above and beyond the normal price for having to deal with "foreign currencies.") While there, in a temple that also serves as a bank, with all of their weapons in a holding area just outside the bank/temple proper, they were part of the group of innocent bystanders there when a band of five bandits decided this was a good time to rob the place. So the five unarmed 3rd-level PCs had to fight off five armed bandits - kind of an unfair fight, although of the whole group of combatants one bandit was slain and the other four captured alive without any casualties on the part of the PCs, so all worked out well. And there was even a reward, as these were notorious criminal wanted for a whole slew of previous crimes.

The second adventure was more on track with the overall campaign goal of freeing people who have been stuck in their dreams. The latest dream-prisoner was a dwarf in an Underdark city just beyond the one the dwarf priestess PC was born and raised in, so after visiting her parents they trekked on to the other city, while dealing with an ambush by a solitary, half-starved choker (an easy kill) and then an hour later another ambush by a band of troglodytes led by a cleric. Dealing with that took up most of the adventure, but when they got to the dreamer they got their butts handed to them big time: they were basically up against an advanced gorynych (three-headed dragon, using a Ghidorah figure from the Godzilla movies as a "miniature") and three of the PCs were slain in the first round. (Fortunately, as it was just a dream, all it did was kick the PCs out of the dream and wake them up.) They went in and tried again several times with the same results, so upon the advice of their moogle dreamwalker trainers, they left a dreamstone on the forehead of the dreaming dwarf and will come back for him much later in their adventuring careers, when they're better able to deal with a CR 24 threat. (The whole point of this exercise was just to point out that not all dreams are going to be able to be defeated immediately.) And then on the way back to the surface (involving another night's stay in the first Underdark city), they helped rescue a brand-new dream victim who had just gotten caught up in his dream the previous night. This was easier to handle, as in his dream he was being chased by a giant with a huge hand in place of his head.

The dwarf priestess also purchased a dire goat riding mount from her city before the group departed. She named him "Pyrite.'

Johnathan
 
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TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
Session number five of our Starfinder campaign.

A technomancer, an operative, an envoy, a solarian and a biohacker.

Last session my group had infiltrated a high-class hotel on the planet Verces to steal some very exclusive club passes from members of the bands that would perform there. They need to get in there to spy on/intervene in a meeting between a scientist that stole some important research data and a unit of a terrorist organization known as Sandstorm Nine. They succeeded on obtaining four passes; they're missing one for the fifth member.

This session, they formulated plan, did some shopping. One of the members, having worked in shipyards in his background, applied for a stage technician job at the club, and this session he went through a short interview and got the job. Then, back at their hotel, they learned that a shadowy Sarcesian came and inquired about them. The hotel's owner did not divulge anything. But one of the team member, the Operative, recognized the individual from camera footage as his rival detective. He wondered why his rival was looking into his business and sent him a message through the infosphere to meet up in a public space.

They met. The Operative invited his rival to sit down but was refused. He asked his rival why he was looking for him. His rival refused to share information, but offered to trade. It seemed that they both had different goals/missions, but for the moment, were both looking for the same individual. The Operative refused to trade information.

To finish the session, the rival pulled a revolver out in the open and put it against the Operative's forehead. The rest of the team rushed to his aid, one of them even taking the car out on the plaza to "bump" the rival. I described how the car moved a few feets beyond where the rival stood, and after the vehicle stopped, they all saw the upper part of his body jutting from the hood. They all thought they had just killed the dude.

But then he turned around as if nothing at happened, pointed at each team member, identifying them "A shirren... a gnome... a maraquoi... a skittermander." And ended by saying "I've got all the information I've need" after which, being only an hologram, he disappeared.

My players were shocked to have been played like that!
 

Richards

Legend
So tonight, after the way to get to a vanished Underdark dwarven city was "unlocked" from our dwarven fighter's mind (where it had been psionically stored away), we used the dwarf's sudden knowledge to find a safe way to the vanished city of Brunniir. We'd spotted it in the distance before on the Plane of Shadow, but whereas last time we traveled through the Plane of Shadow to where Brunniir was, this time we traveled through the Underdark to where Brunniir used to be and then went through a planar gate directly into the middle of the city. It turns out it's much, much safer to do it that way, as there are hordes of incorporeal undead swarming around the outskirts of the city, trying to get in - and it's been that way for the past 500 years or so, when the dwarven city was first shunted out of the Material Plane.

So we ended up on a week-long trek through various Underdark passages, encountering a purple worm on day 2, an elder black pudding on day 5, and a swarm of undead (a caller in darkness, three dread wraiths, and two advanced shadows) who had been intrigued by the "leaking" of shadow energy in the vicinity of the planar gate that eventually took us to Brunniir on day 7. Of the three encounters, it was the last one that was the deadliest, as my lizardfolk PC (after surviving the psionic attack that would have zapped him straight from his normal 129 hp total to -1 hp), failed the Will save in the following round that forced him to automatically self-crit in a suicide attempt. So I raged (3 levels of barbarian) and attacked myself with my own magical battleaxe - and then the gnome cleric swooped in and killed the thing off in one round after I'd spent three rounds dropping it down from 71 hp to 15 hp all on my own while the other four PCs dealt with the lesser threats. (He's a little 3-foot-tall glory hound, that one! And that's after refusing to even try to turn the various undead until after he'd spent the first round seeing to his own personal safety with a death ward spell.)

And empowered magic missile spells are the way to go against incorporeal undead, as our human sorceress proved.

Johnathan
 

Ogre Mage

Adventurer
We continued on the road through the forest to the Wizard of the Wines. We encountered a group of four human travelers on the road with a wagon and a dead horse. The ground was covered with blood. They said wolves had attacked and killed their horse. As we passed around them, they transformed into werewolves and attacked! Two more werewolves came out from hiding and joined the attack. Our rune knight enlarged via giant's might and our moon druid turned into a bear. They engaged the enemy in melee. I opened with twilight sanctuary. The next round I cast moonbeam and began burning the werewolves with Selune's radiance. The second strike of the moonbeam forced one of the werewolves back into human form just as the rune knight's flaming weapon killed another. That seemed to rattle them and they began to retreat. We managed to kill two more as they fled, the other three escaped.

As we continued on the forest road, we encountered a man who claimed to be the seneschal of Count Strahd von Zarovich. He said the Count invited us to dinner at his castle and he could guarantee us safe passage if we came with him now. We were suspicious of the invitation and said we had a mission to complete for the Burgomaster of Krezk, perhaps we could visit the Count after we finished our current obligation. The seneschal said he would convey our message to Count Strahd and departed.
 


Greenfield

Adventurer
I found myself getting really ticked off and frustrated. Almost walked out, except that I'm the host.

Yeah, it's a semi-virtual game, but I have the battle mat and miniatures on my table, and set scenery and positions for everyone.

Our game (3.5) world has been described as fairly hard core feudal, complete with serfs (look it up if you're unfamiliar with the term.)

Our group was approached to see if we would help overthrow an evil King.

First problem: We only have this one person's word that the King is a problem.
Second problem: My character, who is true neutral and really doesn't like "society" still knows better than to have her name associated with any rebellion or plot against a monarchy, even an evil one in a foreign land. Nobility everywhere will defend even an enemy from a commoner taking action against a monarch. It's just not done.

In the real world, medieval setting even when at war, if a commoner struck at a nobleman he was in trouble. Even his own side would jump on him for that. Monarchs ruled by divine right, and for a commoner to attack a noble was seen as a rejection of the divinely ordained order. Bad juju.

Anyway, she advised that we very loudly reject the offer, even if we intended to help. Public rejection of the very idea, while slipping the guy a note saying where we'd meet him.

Idea rejected as if it wasn't made.

We ended up in the presence of the local Duke, on another matter, and the subject came up. My character bent down and whispered something to one character. The DM had NPCs responding as if she (my Druidess) had spoken loud and clear.

I emphasized to the DM, "WHISPERED conversation", and made another comment. Again, the room responded as if my character had been using a bullhorn.

Speaking out of character I explained why she wasn't speaking for or to the room, and that discussing this job in front of the Duke was putting our heads in a noose.

Back in character, another whispered comment. This time the DM acknowledged that he should have made a roll to see if the NPC could overhear what had been said. Dice hit a table and then the NPC asks, "What was that? I missed what you said.", pretty much rubbing it in that there could be no privacy on this subject. NPCs would be pointedly rude in eavesdropping, and then politely ask for the details.

No, the DM wasn't setting us up for a necktie party, he was just being... well I won't write it here, but it's bad.

I walked away from the camera for 10 minutes until I could get my blood pressure under control.

When I returned, we, as a group, had decided to head elsewhere than our erstwhile employer wanted, and sailed to another port. A note had been slipped, and we waited a week before sailing for the land of said evil King.

Everyone in town knew our business. Every ship in port knew that our passage was paid for by said employer, knew exactly where we were going and why.

Somehow, someone knew what we were planning and thinking, and had broadcast it all over the known world.

At this point my character is thinking of killing the employer and delivering his head to the evil King as the organizer of the rebellion.

It would screw the DM's entire adventure to the wall, and probably tick him off severely. No fun for the other players, of course, whick would make me the bad guy over all (me the player, not my character as a team mate), so I'll resist the temptation.

Probably
 

turnip_farmer

Adventurer
Fun session, but I think I screwed up the adventure design. The big, climactic encounter next session will probably kill them. While I don't have a problem with killing characters, per se, I think this will just feel like a big screwjob ('how were we possibly supposed to survive all that?'). I need to either redesign the encounter without it feeling anticlimactic, or think of a way of giving them an opportunity to gain some helping resource.
 

kenada

Legend
Supporter
After two and a half months, we finally got to have a session! The session started on the shore of a river with the characters having finished dealing with some ghouls. This was a soft reboot of the campaign (due to setting building for WWN resulting in some pretty big changes), so we figured out their aspiration: they want to loot the fallen capital. They know it’s a megastructure, and they figure they’ll need some gear and supplies. Their short-term goal for this session was to find a ruin and explore it (with the hope of getting useful treasure).

They set out to the east along the river until they returned to Finland (the settlement they had named in the prior iteration of the campaign returned as their base of operations in this one). On the way into town, they heard from the guards that the Caretaker had sent his hammer orcs to effect obedience in Orlæg, which is just across the river from Finland. There is a population of rebels that are being allowed to reside in Finland, and they are not happy about this.

Finland had been established as an outpost by Warin-Graf, a republic to the east, when it sent its military west to push back the Outsiders that had spewed forth from the capital of the now-fallen kingdom of Adal-Sinths. They fought for ten generations, and the war was nearly over. Unfortunately, Dyrstelice is positioning itself to make a claim to some of the land now that the hard work has been done of liberating it. The guards warned the PCs that the rebels were press-ganging people and to watch out.

The PC steered clear of them and solve off the treasure they recovered from the ghouls, splitting it four ways. Three shares were for the party. The fourth was their fund for carousing the night away (along with some funds to donate to the local temple). The barbarian boasted of their deeds and entertained people with her recorder while the thief won money at cards that the party just turned around and spent. Good times were had by all. I also got a chance to hint at some of the potentially volatile relationships amongst the rebels. A couple of them were vying for the affections of another, and they were making a show of outspending each other and the barbarian in the party.

The next day, they went about their business getting some supplies and asked around town to see if anyone knew anything about where they wanted to go. Their target was Hirzhus, a ruined settlement a couple of hours upstream by boat where the Fin river meets the Eternal Lake. They learned that adventurers had taken an interest to it a month or so ago, but no one returned. There was supposedly treasure there, but it was dangerous. People eventually turned their attention elsewhere.

Someone eventually got the idea to see if there was a sage in town who knew anything about the history of Hirzhus. It turns out there was a researcher who was helping the civilian administration. The barbarian managed to catch him before work, and she talked to him a bit. He mentioned that a peculiar elven had shown up a while back. He was wearing white robes. When he did, the administration took him in another room where the researcher couldn’t hear the conversation. He thought it was odd that the man had neither come nor left with anything, but he was given an audience.

After that, the party caught a boat upstream to Hirzhus. When they arrived, they saw a couple of people in white robes fishing on a dock. The people fled as they were rowed out from the ship to shore. The town itself was in disrepair, but some parts of it were obviously still being used even though it should have been abandoned a long time ago.

The PCs first explored a priest’s quarters and found a latrine. They remained cautious and vigilant, assuming the robed figures were some kind of ill-intented cultists. They moved further into the settlement and found a flooded amphitheater and a statue dedicated to one of the old leaders. None of them actually spoke elven, so no one could read it. They also saw corpses lying across on the far side of the amphitheater, which was the first sign of something actually dangerous. While the party’s priest took a rubbing, one of the robed figures poked her head out from a doorway behind them and got their attention. She invited them inside to meet their patron.

Surprisingly, the party went along with it. The room where the orcish woman brought them was a chapel. There was an altar and some religious paraphernalia. There was also a pear-shaped creature with four wings and four heads, atrophied limbs, and eyes all over its wings and body. The creature’s front-facing head reflects its current mood, and it always appears to face you no matter where you are in relation to it. The woman told the party they should listen to its song. Fortunately for the party, they managed to talk their way out of a performance.

The party managed to learn that there was another creature in the town. A magician had been there long ago, but she disappeared. This creature was a threat to Horsiel (as the thralls referred to the Outsider), but they didn’t want to leave because this was their home now. The party made an excuse about needing to use the latrine, and got out of there.

While they were regrouping and discussing what to do next, the man who had traveled to Finland followed them and then tried to talk to them. He asked if they had been sent there. He explained that he had gone to Finland to ask for help. Some people had shown up, but they stopped coming about a month ago. The party indicated they had not been sent (which was true since they were just looking for places to loot and were not deterred by the fact no one had returned from this one).

The party wants to help with the creature, but they’re not sure about Horsiel’s song. They thing it’s an Outsider, but they don’t have any idea what it is or what it can do. However, they’re sure that song is bad news for them.

They decide to go investigate a bit further. They head around the southern side of the amphitheater and notice pipes leading out of one of the buildings to the forge. They’re not really big, and they’re suspended in the air. The players wrack their brains trying to figure out why it would be set up that way, but they just don’t know. The priest decides she wants to blow up the bodies, which are obvious undead. They set a trap, and she rolls terribly on Smite the Dead. She rolls a 2 and 4. The corpses get no saving throw, but that’s not enough to destroy them.

The party tried to set up a choke point. The thief had set up a fire trap, and the barbarian was chucking spears and trying to dismember them. Unfortunately, the undead are coffer corpses. Unless you’re using magic, they can’t be harmed. They’d go down, then they’d pop back up. The party opted to retreat once the barbarian dropped her axe and ran away in fear. They left the town and decided to rest for the day since it was getting late.

We stopped the session there, but since the barbarian’s goals involved defeating a foe to accomplish them, I let them go back out and try again against the coffer corpses. The priest rolled better, they were destroyed, and we stopped there. The party’s goal for the next session is to solve the mystery of the magician. They know something weird is happening, but they’re not exactly sure what it is.
 

Bupp

Adventurer
A supply caravan went missing. The party was hired to find out what happened and got ambushed by bugbears and hobgoblins. Close fight, but the party prevailed. A sleep spell gave them three captive hobgoblins.

In my world of Eska, the gray elves used Hobgoblin Legions in their millennia long war against the dark elves. Peace was declared 7 years ago, and many of the legions disbanded. These now unemployed troopers have turned to banditry. They had captured the small caravan, and were going to keep the supplies and ransom the prisoners.

The party negotiated with the hobgoblins and came to terms to hire them and their nine brothers as mercenaries. Now now my party has a force of twelve hobgoblin spearmen.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
I found myself getting really ticked off and frustrated. Almost walked out, except that I'm the host.

...

Anyway, she advised that we very loudly reject the offer, even if we intended to help. Public rejection of the very idea, while slipping the guy a note saying where we'd meet him.

...

We ended up in the presence of the local Duke, on another matter, and the subject came up. My character bent down and whispered something to one character. The DM had NPCs responding as if she (my Druidess) had spoken loud and clear.

I emphasized to the DM, "WHISPERED conversation", and made another comment. Again, the room responded as if my character had been using a bullhorn.

Speaking out of character I explained why she wasn't speaking for or to the room, and that discussing this job in front of the Duke was putting our heads in a noose.

Back in character, another whispered comment. This time the DM acknowledged that he should have made a roll to see if the NPC could overhear what had been said. Dice hit a table and then the NPC asks, "What was that? I missed what you said.", pretty much rubbing it in that there could be no privacy on this subject. NPCs would be pointedly rude in eavesdropping, and then politely ask for the details.

No, the DM wasn't setting us up for a necktie party, he was just being... well I won't write it here, but it's bad.

...

Everyone in town knew our business. Every ship in port knew that our passage was paid for by said employer, knew exactly where we were going and why.

Somehow, someone knew what we were planning and thinking, and had broadcast it all over the known world.
You need to talk to your DM about that. Telling the DM that their metagaming, giving every NPC knowledge they shouldn't have, is ruining your fun. And more importantly he's invalidating your player agency by blatantly removing the effects of your playing to be discrete about this.

This isn't something that will fix itself. Be non-confrontation if you can, but be firm.
 

The Lizard Wizard

Adventurer
We took a break from our main game as the DM wanted to work out what’s happening next, it’s been going for a year and a half. Instead he had another idea for a short campaign where we start as high level (8th) characters that have retired 20 years after saving the city from invading devils.

I made an Earth Genasi Ranger (swarmkeeper), it was my first time making a new character since Tasha’s came out.

The game began with the city being attacked by an undead horde, after the battle we learnt that to save the city 20 years ago the king made a deal with some dark lord that’s now come to collect.

It was lots of fun.
 

Richards

Legend
So, in tonight's session we fought some undead on the Plane of Shadows just outside a dwarven city that had been shunted there hundreds of years ago, then followed a find the path spell to the location of a dwarven weaponsmith's forge where the Null Axe - a dwarven superweapon that can destroy the nine remaining Writhing Gates that could potentially destroy all life on the planet if used by an illithid Elder God to return to the Material Plane from the Far Realm - where we ended up fighting an illithilich (undead mind flayer) who's been trying to get into the shielded forge for the past 93 years.

Highlights include:

- Fighting a huecuva in the first battle who cast a flame strike on all five PCs when we were all clumped together trying to take out the dread wraith. The dwarven barbarian failed his save. The dwarven barbarian was wearing a necklace of fireballs, which also failed its save, so the remaining beads on it exploded into flame, dealing more damage to us (and the huecuva) than the flame strike had done. And then the dwarven barbarian's player asked us, "Do I need to make another save for my other necklace of fireballs?" It turns out since he was running low on fireball beads he had recently purchased a second necklace of fireballs and was wearing them both. (Fortunately, the second necklace made its save so it didn't also go all explodey on us.)

- My lizardfolk charging at the illithilich that was waiting for us outside the weaponsmith's forge and pinning its arms in a grapple that prevented him from casting spells or paralyzing anyone with his hands. And the DM had specifically statted him up as a shadowcaster from the Tome of Magic, expecting to be able to spring some new stuff on us that we'd never experienced before. No such luck: all he was able to do from that point on was to wriggle around ineffectively while I kept him pinned and the others pounded him to dust with spells and weapons.

- Leveling up to 14th at the end of this adventure.

Johnathan
 

Ogre Mage

Adventurer
This session was fun! A good mix of roleplaying and action. As we hiked through the forest to the Wizard of the Wines, we came upon a caravan of Vistani including Madam Eva. They invited us into their caravan for a meal. I rolled a natural 20 on my insight check and sensed no ill intent, so we joined them. The interior of the wagon was unnaturally large and luxurious, as if it were under the effect of magnificent mansion spell. Madam Eva said it was fated for us to visit Barovia and read our fortune. She said a lonely mill on a precipice, a con artist in a carnival wagon, a treasure beyond amber doors, a raven in the vines and a father's tomb all had a role to play in our future. She said Count Strahd was once a hero who freed the people of these lands but as ruler some say he had grown evil. We asked why he would have brought us here and she said she did not know. But she knew he was looking for a successor. We finished an excellent meal and departed.

We arrived at the Wizard of the Wines. Davian Martikov told us that their winery had been overtaken by evil druids and their minions. He eyed the two druids in our group suspiciously. We assured him all of us were from outside Barovia and said we would help the Martikovs. Thodak, our dwarf rune knight had a crazy plan to bang on the front door asking the druids to share their wine while the rest of us snuck in. But twig blights rose out of the vineyard and began attacking! Thodak broke down the front door only to be entangled by the evil druid on the other side. Twig blights began grappling Thodak.

The rest of us fended off the twig blights in the field as we backed toward the winery entrance. Kinoka cleared out many twig blights with a flaming sphere. Kandle, our grave cleric of Kelemvor, struck the druid blocking the entry with a guiding bolt, killing him instantly. The session ended with us scurrying toward the winery door, trying to stay ahead of the twig blights.
 
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26th session in my Neverwinter campaign. Three PCs: human genie warlock, drow evoker wizard, half-orc vengeance paladin. In this session, the PCs arrived at Neverwinter. The goal of this session was to introduce the players to the city and present them with a variety of adventure hooks. And that's what happened, basically. I tried writing the recap but it was boring. The session itself was not boring, fortunately. More to come next week...
 
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