D&D 5E "I Have Grandfathered or Incorporated Rules/Features from Previous Editions of D&D into my 5E campaigns." (a poll)

"I have grandfathered/incorporated rules/features from previous editions of D&D in my 5E campaigns."

  • True.

    Votes: 50 86.2%
  • False.

    Votes: 8 13.8%

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
So another simple question:

True or False: "I have grandfathered or incorporated rules/features from previous editions of D&D in my 5E campaigns."

This could mean directly lifting rules or it could mean taking an idea from a previous edition and applying it with rules that better emulate 5E's philosophy/framework, some hybrid - heck, it could just mean a non-mechanical game assumption from a previous edition that is important to your playstyle or setting.
 

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DEFCON 1

Legend
Supporter
The way I run the game probably has aspects and rules from most of the previous editions that I never cared enough to "correct" when I got the 5E rules. Because who cares? If the game works as I run it, then all's good.

DEFCON 1's broken record spins

I don't care about game mechanics... the story is what is important.
** ZZZ-ZZZZPPP **
I don't care about game mechanics... the story is what is important.
** ZZZ-ZZZZPPP **
I don't care about game mechanics... the story is what is important.
** ZZZ-ZZZZPPP **
I don't care about game mechanics... the story is what is important...

:)
 








billd91

Hobbit on Quest (he/him)
And a nat 1 is not an auto-fail. . . I was surprised too - but I still play it that way.
Yeah, I believe this is the second WotC edition that has omitted auto success/fail on saving throws. 3.0 omitted them, but they were restored in 3.5. Now 5e.
 

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
3.0 omitted them

Learning that I was houseruling something 22 years later has got me like. . .

bey GIF
 

Reynard

Legend
Yeah, I believe this is the second WotC edition that has omitted auto success/fail on saving throws. 3.0 omitted them, but they were restored in 3.5. Now 5e.
So I wentr to 5esrd.com to pull it up and I can't even find a dedicated entry on saving throws. Weird.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
Oh all the time. I do it so much and so often, that other DMs have accused me of running a 'hybrid' system. Kits getting recycled as Backgrounds, prestige classes getting repurposed as Subclasses, countless monsters from BECM getting upgraded to 5E (and 5E monsters being retrograded back to their BECM qualities), all that.
 

toucanbuzz

No rule is inviolate
Yeah, I found out the saving throw thing a few weeks ago in a "rules you didn't know" column. A5E reinstated that old-school rule for saving throws, and next campaign (I don't like to change rules mid-stream), we'll go back to how I've been erroneously doing it.
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest (he/him)
So I wentr to 5esrd.com to pull it up and I can't even find a dedicated entry on saving throws. Weird.
Check in the section about Using Ability Scores. In the 5e SRD (version 5.1), it's on page 83. It's the very last section. On 5esrd.com, it's in the section on Ability Scores.
 

Reynard

Legend
Check in the section about Using Ability Scores. In the 5e SRD (version 5.1), it's on page 83. It's the very last section. On 5esrd.com, it's in the section on Ability Scores.
Aha! There is no header on 5esrd.com. Thanks
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A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a poison, a disease, or a similar threat. You don’t normally decide to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm. To make a saving throw, roll a d20 and add the appropriate ability modifier. For example, you use your Dexterity modifier for a Dexterity saving throw. A saving throw can be modified by a situational bonus or penalty and can be affected by advantage and disadvantage, as determined by the GM. Each class gives proficiency in at least two saving throws. The wizard, for example, is proficient in Intelligence saves. As with skill proficiencies, proficiency in a saving throw lets a character add his or her proficiency bonus to saving throws made using a particular ability score. Some monsters have saving throw proficiencies as well. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw is determined by the effect that causes it. For example, the DC for a saving throw allowed by a spell is determined by the caster’s spellcasting ability and proficiency bonus. The result of a successful or failed saving throw is also detailed in the effect that allows the save. Usually, a successful save means that a creature suffers no harm, or reduced harm, from an effect.
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I have been doing it wrong this whole edition.
 

Stormonu

Legend
True - I’m using criticals from 2E/3E, shooting into ranged from 3E.

There’s others I’m sure I am incorporating subconsciously, maybe even from other game systems.
 

Orius

Hero
False.

Instead I have incorporated features from 5e into my previous edition of D&D campaign. Specifically, we're using the spell sheet from the 5e character sheet in my 2e game, along with the standard 2e character sheets I found here on ENWorld, and the magic item sheet from 3.5's Magic Item Compendium. I also have 2e conversions of the spells misty step and thunderwave in my house rules document.
 

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