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Ian Livingstone of Games Workshop Knighted in 2022 New Years Honours List

Sir Ian Livingstone, co-founder of Games Workshop and White Dwarf magazine has been knighted in the 2022 New Year Honours List.

You may remember him from the Fighting Fantasy books, or the introduction of British published versions of D&D, or from Warhammer. Lara Croft was created under his watch as president of Eidos Interactive. Though he was awarded for his contributions to the online gaming industry, many know him for his authorship and analog gaming contributions. He received an OBE in 2006, and a CBE in 2013.

Livingstone has been awarded the rank of Knight Bachelor. Awards like this reward long-term national contributions to UK arts, science, charity, welfare, and public service; people who have committed themselves to serving and helping the UK; other countries, such as the USA, have their own systems of civic awards -- the US equivalent is often regarded as the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Other well-known recipients this year include government medical officers Professor Sir Jonathan Van-Tam and Professor Sir Chris Whitty, who UK readers will be very familiar with from their frequent Covid briefings. The Cabinet Office has reported that 1-in-5 of the this year's honours were pandemic related, including medical staff, those involves in producing vaccines, the chief medical officers for England, Scotland, and Wales, and more.

The yearly honours are announced at New Year each year, and on the Queen's birthday. They are presented later in person by the Queen or the Prince of Wales (yes, a sword is involved). The honours system recognises British and Commonwealth nationals or citizens (although honourary awards can be given to others).

Daniel Craig (James Bond) got a CMG in this year's New Years's honours list, which is the same award the character James Bond has (this is not a knighthood).

Are you are thrilled? Turn to section 94. If not, turn to section 102.

Games Workshop.jpeg

Ian Livingstone is one of the founding fathers of the UK games industry. He co-founded Games Workshop in 1975, launching Dungeons & Dragons and Warhammer in Europe. In 1982, he co-authored The Warlock of Firetop Mountain, the first gamebook in the multi-million selling Fighting Fantasy series. When Chairman of video games publisher Eidos plc, he launched Lara Croft: Tomb Raider in 1996. In 2011, he co-authored the Next Gen review and chaired the Next Gen Skills campaign, working with government to introduce the new Computing curriculum in schools in 2014. With a focus on creativity and computational thinking, the Livingstone Academy, Bournemouth opened in 2021 to enable children to be digital makers as well as digital consumers. He is Chairman Sumo Group plc, Partner at Hiro Capital, Non-executive Director of the National Citizen Service, Non-executive Director Aspirations Academies Trust, Non-executive Director Foundation for Education Development, Non-executive Director Creative UK, Member of Raspberry Pi Foundation and President of the BGI.


 
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darjr

I crit!
You know it took me years (possibly into double figures) before I realised Steve Jackson (Games Workshop and FF) was a completely different person to Steve Jackson (GURPS & Steve Jackson games).
I just thought he'd been really busy.
For a while I went out of my way to mention that those two were different. Almost always folks would say "I know", so I stopped.

Only now, here at the end of all things, do I discover you and you already know.
 

Henry

Autoexreginated
For a while I went out of my way to mention that those two were different. Almost always folks would say "I know", so I stopped.

Only now, here at the end of all things, do I discover you and you already know.
Hope you feel better, then, because I didn't know that until (checks watch) four minutes ago. :LOL:
Never was that important to me, so I never looked into it, I just assumed same person!

In more relevant conversation, congrats to Sir Ian! He's always been one of those people, like Gary G. and Dave A., who shaped my teenage years so much.
 

darjr

I crit!
Hope you feel better, then, because I didn't know that until (checks watch) four minutes ago. :LOL:
Never was that important to me, so I never looked into it, I just assumed same person!

In more relevant conversation, congrats to Sir Ian! He's always been one of those people, like Gary G. and Dave A., who shaped my teenage years so much.
Nki.gif
 







Greggy C

Explorer
Supporter
Sir Ian Livingstone, co-founder of Games Workshop and White Dwarf magazine has been knighted in the 2022 New Year Honours List.

You may remember him from the Fighting Fantasy books,
I rebought all my fighting fantasy books last year, because nostalgia, or at least 1-50. I did not however buy 51-60 because those were expensive and unlike D&D modules I don't think grand kids would get their money back on those once all the old guys die off.
 

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GreyLord

Legend
I rebought all my fighting fantasy books last year, because nostalgia, or at least 1-50. I did not however buy 51-60 because those were expensive and unlike D&D modules I don't think grand kids would get their money back on those once all the old guys die off.
I have all the originals.

There are more than 59 (or 60) Fighting Fantasy Books now. I'm not sure I have them all.

Earlier last decade (2010s) they were releasing new ones (Eye of the Dragon, Curse of the Mummy...finally, Howl of the Werewolf, Night of the Necromancer). Those I think went out of print but now they are printing others recently (Gates of Death, Port of Peril, Assassins of Allanasia). I'm not sure I have all of them as they've changed the numbering conventions and various others things that helped keep track of the old series and their place within them.

I keep them for myself though, not for any resell value they may have. It would be great if my kids knew how to sell them for value, but more than likely when I die they'll sell them off in a lot sale or something like that for 25-50 cents a piece.

Worse than that is my RPG and Boardgame collection. I have games worth thousands of dollars (that's single games that are worth over a thousand dollars each in many instances) if sold correctly. Some still in the boxes they were originally shipped in. Those will probably sell for $1 at a lot sell after I die. Enjoy things in the now...because what you value invariably others probably will not.
 

Greggy C

Explorer
Supporter
How old are you? Maybe work on a will which gives me your collection.

One thing I found that amused me, was an audible series which is a Fighting Fantasy play, narrated by actors who work there way through the Warlock of Firetop mountain and a few more books.
 
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Congrats to Sir Ian! +1000 Glory indeed!

I wonder if any other gaming figures have earned any comparable honors? (or "honours" :) )

I keep them for myself though, not for any resell value they may have. It would be great if my kids knew how to sell them for value, but more than likely when I die they'll sell them off in a lot sale or something like that for 25-50 cents a piece.

Worse than that is my RPG and Boardgame collection. I have games worth thousands of dollars (that's single games that are worth over a thousand dollars each in many instances) if sold correctly. Some still in the boxes they were originally shipped in. Those will probably sell for $1 at a lot sell after I die. Enjoy things in the now...because what you value invariably others probably will not.
Might be worth leaving a list of them with some basic instructions and guidance along those lines, in a "last wishes" folder or with your will and such. But if you prefer to let the treasures up to chance, in hopes that some other gamer may luck into them at the thrift shop, of course that's its own kindness. :)
 

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