Illusion Question

MINI

First Post
This question came up during a Labrynth Lord game: What happens when a magic-user conjures up an illusionary basilisk to attack another illusionary basilisk? The magic-user did not know that the first basilisk was an illusion and was just trying something to keep the thing busy for a bit. :)
 

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RUMBLETiGER

Adventurer
This question came up during a Labrynth Lord game: What happens when a magic-user conjures up an illusionary basilisk to attack another illusionary basilisk? The magic-user did not know that the first basilisk was an illusion and was just trying something to keep the thing busy for a bit. :)
First off, the illusion would not have any of the Extraordinary or Supernatural abilities of the base creature.

Second, an illusion is under the control of the caster, so it depends entirely upon if the casters think the illusion is, in fact, an illusion. It appears the caster of the second illusion has not successfully identified the first basilisk as an illusion, based upon what you stated, so it depends on if the first caster of the original illusion basilisk can identify the nature of the second one.
If the caster of the first basilisk sees the second caster magically create a second basilisk, did the first caster succeed on a spellcraft check to identify that the second caster was casting an illusion as opposed to a summon? Does the first caster, even if failing to identify the casting, recognize the second basilisk as an illusion?
The first caster should be able to make a spellcraft check and a will save. If he succeeds on either of these things, he knows the second basilisk is an illusion and therefore can choose to do whatever he wants, which is most likely to ignore it.
If he does not recognize that the second basilisk is an illusion, he'd likey assume the second caster summoned an actual creature and interact accordingly, most likely interact with it.

Third, based upon the first point that neither illusion would have the petrifying gaze attack, everybody should likely catch on real quick that there is something fishy going on, since nothing is turning to stone.
 
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Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
Yeah, a basilisk is a pretty terrible choice for an illusion. You don't even get the imminent threat of other illusory beasts, like a dragon with smoking pouring from its mouth.
 

JiffyPopTart

Bree-Yark
First off, the illusion would not have any of the Extraordinary or Supernatural abilities of the base creature.

I snipped a lot of your breakdown. The problem with your breakdown is that the question pertains to Labyrinth Lord, not 3e. There are WAY WAY WAY less rules for illusions in an old school clone game.

I'd say, with my GM hat on, that if the two wizards have their basilisks confronting one another you describe an epic battle of wills between the two as the two monsters struggles to establish power and completely petrify the other. Describe how ones body slowly begins to turn to stone, only to have it recover and shake it off returning the favor to the other. Either way nothing ultimately happens so its basically both wizards wasting their turns keeping the other wizards illusion at bay.

If at some point one or both wizards decide their basilisk will ignore the other for more easy prey then you let them attack unrelated to each other.

DS
 

MINI

First Post
I should add that our DM had one of our group turn to stone because they failed a save but once we drug them out of sight of the illusion they quickly went back to a flesh state. it was kind of a neat ruling given the situation.
 

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