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Incidents of Full Stop.


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MarkB

Legend
Sounds like you have the definition correct. Declaring something and finishing it with "full stop" is basically saying "this is right, end of discussion". And if that something is contrary to what you were saying, the "you are wrong" is implicit.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
I've tried looking the the phrase "Full Stop" as just a term, but it always hits me right between the eyes as rude and dismissive.

I feel like people are saying "You are wrong, this is right, end of discussion" to me.

Meh, I vented, I'm good now.

With all due respect, you are 100% wrong. Full stop.

No offense, but I think you're taking things the wrong way.
 




Sounds like you have the definition correct. Declaring something and finishing it with "full stop" is basically saying "this is right, end of discussion". And if that something is contrary to what you were saying, the "you are wrong" is implicit.

There are limited applications of "full stop" that don't have to imply "you are wrong". It can be used to stop a conversation from going in a certain direction that is deemed inappropriate. For example, if a D&D session unexpectedly became sexual in nature. Or if someone suddenly brings politics and religion into a situation at work. In these scenarios, you can use "full stop" as a way to communicate "lets turn this conversation around and get back to a safe place before it gets nasty". Of course, the simple act of stating you don't want to discuss certain topics will be offensive to some people.
 






It seems we're discovering a lot of people will take 'full stop' to mean different things clearly. For me, it's always a context thing. If someone is giving me directions on something, I'd take full stop to mean 'don't do anything other than what I literally (and I mean LITERALLY) just told you'. Now, if we're having a heated 'discussion' and I hear 'full stop', that means either 'end of discussion' (if from someone else - "We are done with this fighting. Full stop.") or if the other individual makes a point and ends it with 'Full stop', THAT means to me they're trying to metaphorically spike the volleyball and end it. A verbal coup de grace.

This discussion reminds me that I should go back to the classics like Tron and end my discussions with "END OF LINE"

-- END OF LINE
 

It's ideally used to remove unrelated aspects of an argument. For example, in a discussion about healing someone might point out that the Life Cleric is a powerful healer, but that's irrelevant because of its poor DPR. It would be acceptable responding with "the Life Cleric is a powerful healer. Full stop." This points out that the focus of the discussion is on healing, and the rest of their argument is superfluous. Even when used in this way, however, it's going to come off as rude.

Sadly, you are correct that it's almost always used as a way to shut down disagreement. Except in extremely common belief (e.g. "Eating babies is wrong. Full stop."), this is very inappropriate, stifling legitimate debate.
 



Eltab

Lord of the Hidden Layer
I've tried looking the the phrase "Full Stop" as just a term, but it always hits me right between the eyes as rude and dismissive.

I feel like people are saying "You are wrong, this is right, end of discussion" to me.

Meh, I vented, I'm good now.
I can see the 'as used in argument' description, which is probably the most common.

The phrase reminds me of safety lessons at work to drive a forklift: "When you come to this crossway, you stop - full stop; no rolling slowly forward - and look every which way for other traffic." I still see a loaded forklift when I encounter the phrase.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I've tried looking the the phrase "Full Stop" as just a term, but it always hits me right between the eyes as rude and dismissive.

I feel like people are saying "You are wrong, this is right, end of discussion" to me.

Meh, I vented, I'm good now.
I mean, you're not wrong in that that's basically what it means. Though it's not quite as aggressive as that.

It's the same as "Period". A 'period' is the American version of a 'full stop'.
 

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