D&D 5E Is Tasha's More or Less The Universal Standard?

Synthil

Explorer
We allow all of it. The party with a Twilight Cleric got TPKed in the second session, so I can't comment on how overpowered it is.
The Peace cleric however seemed a bit too strong in another campaign. Healed the most, tanked the most and did the most damage of the group. This was, however, the UA "Unity cleric" version of it.

The sorcerers are clearly stronger. But that puts them on par with the other casters in terms of power and enjoyment. I'd rather give the other sorcerers expanded spells known, than not allow the Tasha's subclasses.
 

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WarDriveWorley

Explorer
I allow all of it with a caveat that I always have my players run choices by me first. One reason for this is that the story may affect a player's choices and I want to make sure my players understand what they're taking. Some of my players have a bad habit of skimming content that I'm trying to beat out of them...I mean explain why this is not the best way with a well placed logic discussion.
 

Li Shenron

Legend
I do not allow it whole by default.

If it didn't have all those free boosts for specific classes, I would have easily allowed most character material even if I personally don't like the majority of it (in fact I didn't buy the book myself) but those free boosts were a dealbreaker, so now my players would have to "mother may I" with me for every single bit of character material from that book.
 




aco175

Legend
My group does not own it, so we do not use it, but I did give out the option of +2/+1 where ever you want at character creation the last campaign. There may some other things that start to creep in.
 


Azzy

KMF DM
My group uses all of it. Started my character creation before it came out, so we didn't get to use the floating ASIs, but we have a Path of the Beast Barbarian, Soulknife Rogue, and a (retroactively) Genie Warlock and we use all the class options.
 
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Burnside

Space Jam Confirmed
Supporter
I allow it and am running and playing in multiple campaigns where it's in use. There is absolutely some power creep but it's not a disaster or anything.

One campaign has a Twilight Cleric who is now level 7, and the Twilight Sanctuary ability can trivialize some encounters and as written slows down combat with everybody rolling for temps at the beginning of every one of their turns - we've modified it so that the cleric rolls once on their turn and that's the amount of temp HP everybody gets at the start of their turn. I would agree with those that say it's a badly-designed ability.

Haven't seen the Peace Cleric in action yet. I have various players currently using the Swarmkeeper Ranger, Soulknife Rogue, Wild Magic Barbarian, and Circle of Stars Druid and all are very fun and I have no problem with any of them. I'm currently running an Oath of the Watchers Paladin who is now level 7 and I would likewise say it's very good.

I've allowed all the option rules since the book came out and none of them have caused any issues; many of them are quality-of-life improvements or simply allow players to back out of unsatisfactory choices they may have made when they level up (like switching fighting styles or cantrips). Nothing game-breaking at all. My Paladin has the Blessed Warrior option (2 cleric cantrips instead of a fighting style) and it helped me make him closer to the character I envisioned. Power-wise, having Guidance and Toll the Dead on him is definitely very good but you do feel the absence in combat of having one of the traditional fighting styles so I'd say it's quite balanced. I see rogues use Steady Aim a fair amount when they have no other way to get sneak attack, but again they are sacrificing all their movement and their bonus action to do it, so it feels balanced to me. The changes to spell lists seem more like correcting oversights than anything else, and all seem appropriate for their classes.

I have seen zero problems whatsoever with the new uncoupled racial ability score modifier options. We always use standard array, so honestly you're not gonna see any wacky results just because the scores are maybe a point or two more optimized. If you use some rolling method or enhanced array that results in inflated scores overall, maybe you'd see more issues.

Aside from Twilight Sanctuary, I'd say the only other annoying thing for me coming out of Tasha's is that they added a bunch more summoning spells. I applauded 5E's previous restraint in this area, as summoned creatures generally represent more admin and tend to bog down combat.
 


J-H

Hero
Basically how many people are you aware of using Tasha's as is out in the wild? Do DMs allow it, parts of it,not allow it or just not aware of it.
How about online for those of you who play online?
Parts of it, for me. Most of the subclasses are fine, but a few aren't. Some of the optional rules are fine, some of them are terrible.
It's the standard for "I guess I'm not buying any more books due to a drop in quality."
 

We do not use the custom races due to our gaming group’s culture.

We take feats or subclasses as we wish.

My friend just took a twilight cleric and it likely saved the party. I don’t know how to feel about them yet. On paper they seem a bit much though.

The one guy in the group that pushes boundaries is not competitive and uses moar power to save other party members.
 

So far, none of it made it to my games. Players Voted overwhemingly against it. (11 of 12 voted against).
We are considering adding the feats though.
For the ranger, our little modification for Hunter's mark (no concentration required for non multiclassed rangers) and Making commanding the companion a bonus action which lasts until target is dead or command becomes null (and a bonus action to change target/command) works quite well for us.
 

So far, none of it made it to my games. Players Voted overwhemingly against it. (11 of 12 voted against).
We are considering adding the feats though.
For the ranger, our little modification for Hunter's mark (no concentration required for non multiclassed rangers) and Making commanding the companion a bonus action which lasts until target is dead or command becomes null (and a bonus action to change target/command) works quite well for us.
Frankly that is what has gotten most use from us—-the feats.

I flirted with taking a. Warlock with an efreet patron. My friend took the twilight cleric.

I guess the basic issue for us is incongruent flavor. It’s hard for me to pinpoint but its a bit “flashy” and superhero for us.

I enjoyed the crusher feat with a mace wielding Paladin. I think I will be taking fey touched with an arcana cleric.
 


renbot

Explorer
We use it pretty extensively. As a DM I allow all the spells, feats, and optional class abilities but I do draw the line at the Twilight Cleric. I can live with an overpowered subclass or a poorly designed no-coherent-theme subclass, but I'm not going to tolerate one that his both.
 

DND_Reborn

Legend
Basically how many people are you aware of using Tasha's as is out in the wild?
Other than posters here who claim to allow universal acceptance, IME every group I've talked with about it allow only very limited parts or nothing at all. Overall, it is unmitigated power creep. I've tried aspects of it in my games and found them unbalanced compared to prior material and the style of play I enjoy personally. Conceptually, a lot of it has promise, but it was poorly designed IMO--so the options are either house-rule it to rein it back a bit or not bother.

The most redeeming information in it are the sidekick classes. That is really the only thing I've incorporated completely into my games.

So, no, I would not claim it is the universal standard by any stretch of the imagination.
 


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