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Legends & Lore: Experience Points and Levels


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I'm A Banana

Potassium-Rich
A refinement on 4e's under-utilized Quest system and 2e/3e's ad-hoc XP is a welcome addition to the game!

XP has always been one of the things that is really easy to change up at an individual table, and that's part of why it's been such a robust system. I'm into explicit support for both. Easy, non-controversial article!
 


MerricB

Eternal Optimist
I found the lack of XP listings in the bestiary a bit of a nuisance, since I am trying to insert some of these creatures in my own adventure and I would like to know their level and XP value.
Yeah; it's also trickier to adjust for # players without that information.

Cheers!
 
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KidSnide

Adventurer
Mike said at the very bottom that rather than having adventure designers force the issue of having to include a "correct" number of encounters to get to character level up via straight XP... it's better to allow the designers to include both options-- monster XP and story-based advancement.

Did he outright say "We're going to force every adventure we write to have both methods represented in it"? No. But did he suggest that both methods can be represented as per what makes most sense to the adventure writer? Yes. Ipso facto... depending on the adventure (especially for Adventure Path modules as he called them out specifically), we will see both methods show up.
I see this as a pretty big deal for adventure quality. Under a traditional xp system, adventure designers who were expecting a certain leveling rate needed to pad their ideas with a bunch of encounters that aren't really essential to the design. I hope that this frees up adventure writers to focus more on the heart of their scenario.

-KS
 

Thyrwyn

First Post
I see this as a pretty big deal for adventure quality. Under a traditional xp system, adventure designers who were expecting a certain leveling rate needed to pad their ideas with a bunch of encounters that aren't really essential to the design. I hope that this frees up adventure writers to focus more on the heart of their scenario.

-KS
Well said.
 

MerricB

Eternal Optimist
I see this as a pretty big deal for adventure quality. Under a traditional xp system, adventure designers who were expecting a certain leveling rate needed to pad their ideas with a bunch of encounters that aren't really essential to the design. I hope that this frees up adventure writers to focus more on the heart of their scenario.

-KS
It is a pretty big deal. Being able to set advancement at any speed for the needs of the adventure makes it so much easier to write long adventure paths.

Cheers!
 

dd.stevenson

Super KY
It is a pretty big deal. Being able to set advancement at any speed for the needs of the adventure makes it so much easier to write long adventure paths.

Cheers!
Besides which, I'm also choosing to see this as evidence of commitment to the AP format going forward.
 



TarionzCousin

Second Most Angelic Devil Ever
Besides which, I'm also choosing to see this as evidence of commitment to the AP format going forward.
Or, at least, inclusion of the Adventure Path format. As Mistwell noted above, it would still be nice to know the XP for monsters/encounters.

This article looks like filler to me, but it is reassuring filler.


Also, I really like the illustration:

 

howandwhy99

First Post
I'm repeating myself from a week or so ago, but W1: The Crucible of Freya does a decent job of introducing how both adventure path and sandbox designs may be published in the same product. And different XP methods could be published to accommodate different DMing styles in the same work.
 

Mistwell

Legend
I'm repeating myself from a week or so ago, but W1: The Crucible of Freya does a decent job of introducing how both adventure path and sandbox designs may be published in the same product.
It's not D&D, but from what I have heard, "Masks of Nyarlathotep" (a CoC adventure) does this better than any other published adventure.
 

Jan van Leyden

Adventurer
It's not D&D, but from what I have heard, "Masks of Nyarlathotep" (a CoC adventure) does this better than any other published adventure.
Both "Masks" and "The Enemy Within", which predate the Adventure Path idea, still have problems with the junctions. Sometimes the players need to get a certain clue to proceed which can be troublsome to provide them with. "The Enemy Within" does, IMHO, a better job: the players acquire a river boat and can drive along the large rivers at their pleasure. Different scenarios are waiting on th ebanks of the Reik river, but the PCs don't have to swallow the bait at once. The time pressure known from other adventure paths isn't present at all.

One of the included scenarios is even so cool that the PCs adventure at one side, leave it, and at some point find another clue leading them back.

The strength of both campaigns, shough, lies in the rather disjunct scenarios which give the payers a lot of freedom.

Another interesting concept is realized in a different CoC campaign: "Beyond the Mountains of Madness". It casts the PCs as members of a polar expedition, which severly liits their freedom of choice. :cool: Many players may balk at this idea, but, if they get into it, it works very well.
 

pemerton

Legend
I read the article last night before bed. I read it again this morning. I just read it again before posting... I don't get it.
They're going to support both XP levelling and non-XP levelling:

a much better approach is to allow designers to present both options, and let DMs decide how best to run any adventure. . . The game must provide options to support different styles of play — especially when it's clear that the default way of doing things no longer matches the way so many DMs run their games.​

Good to see a long standing method of level advancement get some recognition.
This is not an innovation. 4e already recognised this, and in its DMG discussed non-XP-based levelling.

Perhaps worth noting that in the recent Scourge of the Sword Coast adventure, the monsters in the bestiary list no XP, and the adventure simply states when the party levels
I see this as a pretty big deal for adventure quality.
Explicitly acknowledging that story designs just need signposts saying "You are now level 5" is a big step forward.
It is a pretty big deal. Being able to set advancement at any speed for the needs of the adventure makes it so much easier to write long adventure paths.
This is the innovation, as far as I can tell: actually designing adventures in a way that incorporates non-XP-based levelling. That was missing from 4e modules.
 

Aloïsius

First Post
Anyway, with bounded acuracy, this is not an issue so crucial as it was. I mean, in 3e, fighting a monster of the wrong CR could be 100% lethal. But now ? If I understand correctly, it will just mean that the PC will lose much more hit points and other expandable ressources, but it won't be an impossible fight.
 

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