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PF2 Leshies Previewed From Lost Omens Character Guide

Leshies are another of the three new ancestries from the new Pathfinder 2E book. Nature spirits given form, these guys havecrafted plant bodies.

083019_LeafLeshy_360.jpg


This small-sized race has 8 hit points, 25' speed, and gains sustenance from the sun. They have Constitution and Wisdom boosts, and an Intelligence flaw. They also have their own ancestry feats, including this one:

Screenshot 2019-09-03 at 16.55.06.png

More info here.
 
Russ Morrissey

Comments

TwoSix

Lover of things you hate
They are plant people. Plant people are a fantasy trope. It's nice. Now I can play a deku scrub or a korok.
Yea, I think the more exposed to video games you are, the more that "plant people" are a familar trope. Sylvari in Guild Wars, the Deku and Koroks in Zelda, etc.
 

RSIxidor

Explorer
Yea, I think the more exposed to video games you are, the more that "plant people" are a familar trope. Sylvari in Guild Wars, the Deku and Koroks in Zelda, etc.
I think there's plenty even outside of video games. Dryads, ents, some interpretations of kodama, mangaboos from Oz, Nym from Wheel of Time, Swamp Thing, Piccolo (somewhere between plant and slug, really), Zhaan in Farscape, Poison Ivy, Dr. Reginald Bushroot, cactaceae from Bas-lag. I'm going to stop there but there's plenty other examples.

Most of those still aren't a plant person quite in the same way as the ones depicted up top, where they are very leafy and flowery. Several of them you wouldn't even know were plants or plant-like unless you really looked into it. And perhaps none of these were quite popular enough tropes for a significant amount of people to attach to the idea of playing a hero plant.

Anyway, it probably also says something about me that the first sentient plants I thought of are from Zelda (it's that I like Zelda games). There's of course some other video game ones, like Thorians and Spriggans, so I don't think you're entirely wrong in your assessment that video games may have increased familiarity with the idea.
 

Arilyn

Explorer
I like them. They wouldn't suit every campaign world, but would be great with a Fairy Tale theme, or adventures that focus heavily in magical forest locales.

4e has wilden and 13th Age has a playable fungal race, so it's not like Paizo is heading off into unknown territory.
 

Dire Bare

Adventurer
I... uhh... I feel very out of touch.

I'm thinking "they're jumping the shark" and yet the fans on the Paizo board are cheering.
For me, it's the artwork, I really don't like it. It does not inspire me to want to play a leshy.

I remember the artwork for the killoren back in D&D 3E DID look super cool to me and made me want to roll up one of those plant fey dudes. Then in 4E they were reconcepted as "wilden" and accompanied by artwork I did not care for, and I lost interest in the race.

Quality artwork that presents a heroic image can move folks, despite the fact we aren't supposed to "judge a book by its cover".

NOTE: I'm sure Paizo intends this a quality work and inspirational, it's probably just different strokes for different folks. I'm very much played out on Wayne Reynolds style.
 

Parmandur

Legend
For me, it's the artwork, I really don't like it. It does not inspire me to want to play a leshy.

I remember the artwork for the killoren back in D&D 3E DID look super cool to me and made me want to roll up one of those plant fey dudes. Then in 4E they were reconcepted as "wilden" and accompanied by artwork I did not care for, and I lost interest in the race.

Quality artwork that presents a heroic image can move folks, despite the fact we aren't supposed to "judge a book by its cover".

NOTE: I'm sure Paizo intends this a quality work and inspirational, it's probably just different strokes for different folks. I'm very much played out on Wayne Reynolds style.
Buckles....buckles everywhere...
 

Campbell

Relaxed Intensity
They kind of ended up in a weird place with the ancestries in the Lost Omens Character Guide. Most of the ancestries fans are looking forward to are coming in the Advanced Player's Guide. The ancestries they chose to highlight were chosen primarily for their special place in the setting or areas they want to see more development in moving forward.

They are all explicitly Uncommon meaning they are not a good fit for every campaign and require explicit GM approval to utilize. For my part under the right circumstances I could see having a Lizardfolk or Hobgoblin PC, but they would still be treated like a Lizardfolk or Hobgoblin in game. I am not crazy about the Leshies, but that's just purely an aesthetic choice.
 

Campbell

Relaxed Intensity
This is what the Core Rule book has to say on Rarity

Core Rulebook said:
USING RARITY AND ACCESS

The rarity system has two purposes: to convey how common or rare certain spells, creatures, or items are in the game world, and to give you an easy tool to control the complexity of your game. Uncommon and rare options aren’t more powerful than other options of their level, but they introduce complications for certain types of stories, or are less common in the world. For instance, it might be more challenging to run a mystery adventure when a player can cast an uncommon spell such as detect evil.

At the start of the campaign, communicate your preferred expectations on rarity to the players. Unless you decide otherwise, the players can choose from any common options they qualify for, plus any uncommon options granted by their character choices—primarily their ancestry and class. By default, a character who
tries hard enough might eventually find an uncommon option, whereas a rare option is always a special reward.

Beyond that baseline, you can grant access as freely as you want; some GMs open up all uncommon and rare options universally. If you’re not sure, just look over any uncommon or rare elements before you include them as rewards or otherwise allow a player to acquire them.

Rewards

You can use uncommon and rare rules elements to reward characters. These still have the same value and approximate power as any other treasure of the same Price, but they’re just a bit more special because they hail from distant lands or have unusual or surprising abilities.

Items are the most likely candidates for uncommon or rare rewards, but an NPC might teach an uncommon or rare spell to a PC in gratitude or to help the party prepare for a certain adversary. You can also improvise extra benefits based around uncommon or rare items. For instance, if a PC gains a rare plant with occult uses, you might also decide that the PC should temporarily get more money if they use it while Earning Income using Herbalism Lore, because it enables them to produce novel poultices.

Different Locations

The rarities in this book assume you’re playing in the Inner Sea region of Golarion, where most Pathfinder games are set. These rarities are also suitable for most western medieval fantasy games. However, you might want to alter the rarities for a campaign set in another location on Golarion (detailed in Chapter 8), to emphasize a non-human culture, or to play in a fantasy setting with different roots, like a wuxia game based on Chinese culture. These changes most often affect basic items. If you start your campaign in a dwarven stronghold, for example, you might make all the weapons with the dwarf trait common. You should feel free to adjust rarities to suit your campaign’s theme, but if you do, you should share your changes with your group.
Rarity is meant as a tool to help GMs communicate their expectations for a game as well as to indicate how common a given element is in the setting. The baseline expectations are based on the Inner Sea region of Golarion and the sort of stories and themes Paizo wants to focus on. GMs are free to change those expectations for their individual games. If you want to make Elves and Dwarves uncommon or rare for your own game you are free to do so.

Obviously choosing to make Hobgoblins or Raise Dead Uncommon are design choices that involve an aesthetic judgement about the sort of fiction they expect for the game. I am personally grateful to have rarity as a tool to help GMs curate their campaigns.

Part of what rarity allows them to do is experiment with more niche content without GMs feeling pressured to allow content in their game they feel does not fit with the themes and sorts of stories they want their games to be about.
 

Ravenbrook

Villager
Yea, I think the more exposed to video games you are, the more that "plant people" are a familar trope. Sylvari in Guild Wars, the Deku and Koroks in Zelda, etc.
Don't forget about the vegepygmies! They go all the way back to 1st edition D&D and were always one of my favorite monsters.
 

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