D&D General Maps, Maps, Maps! Dungeons, Ruins, Caverns, Temples, and more... aka Where Dyson Dumps His Maps.

Mineshaft-Tower.jpg


Drake Pit Tower

The wizard Azkalador was an ambitious alchemist who discovered a rare vein of “energized” gold that could be further enhanced to create potent potions and elixirs well beyond their typical craft. Mining for this gold, Azkalador finally discovered what was making the gold so special – at the heart of the vein was a golden egg a full twenty inches across. The egg was hot to the touch and radiated not just heat but potent magical energy – as well as some form of magical influence over those who found it, as several miners fell upon each other with their picks to claim the egg, even as Azkalador watched.

Once the egg was extracted from the gold veins, the gold quickly reverted first to normal gold, and then to a black material with the tensile strength of gold without the lustre that poisoned any preparation Azkalador made with it. Azkalador’s attention thus switched to the egg itself, and multiple alchemical and magical attempts were made to hatch it. Finally, Azkalador took the egg to a tropical island and hatched it on a beach surrounded by as much gold as the alchemist could produce, borrow, or steal.

What erupted from the egg was an elemental dragon – a beast of gold, fire, and wrath. It shrugged off Azkalador’s attempts to control it and killed the haughty wizard within the first few hours of its life. It terrorized those tropical islands for decades before being exiled from this world along with Azkalador’s gold.

The tower remains here, far from the dragon’s wrath. A two-story structure with a small wooden building atop it, all perched over the gold mine where the magical gold was once found. There are now veins of strange soft black metal throughout the dungeon levels below – and the upper levels (1 and 2) have been cleaned up hiding the origins of the structure as a mine. Level 3 still contains extensive mines, (and the bottom of the central pit of the mine, while level 4 has become a sump, half-flooded and befouled.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 10,200 pixels (34 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for my preferred 10′ squares) – so resizing it to either 2,380 pixels wide or 4,760 pixels wide, respectively.

 

log in or register to remove this ad

The-Strangled-Imp-Promo.jpg


The Strangled Imp Tavern

The Strangled Imp is a dark and cramped space, with wooden beams and a slowly decaying roof that leaks into the owner’s apartments above. The air is thick with smoke, sweat, and the smell of ale and rancid meat. The floor is very old stone fieldstone, predating this building by a few centuries. A fireplace dominates the wall opposite the front door, where a spit of meat slowly roasts – the other walls are adorned with rusty weapons and taxidermied animal heads. The tavern has no “bar” per se, with the staff instead typically found sitting at a table or the chair near the back room – serving drinks and collecting coin as required.

The sign for the tavern is a foot-tall wooden carving of a small demonic cherub-like form, their tail wrapped around their neck and then attached to the wall outside the front door by a large nail. The front of the tavern is a raised stone “porch” with a small bench and a few chairs used in pleasant weather by those who find the tight interior a bit too much. The side door of the tavern leads into the alleyway between the Imp and the leatherworker’s next door. The alley is particularly foul as patrons use this space to relieve themselves of all the ale they’ve consumed – sometimes quite messily.

Upstairs we have the home of the owner – the owner sleeps in the bed on the left, in the main room before the hearth. The back bedroom on the right is for the owner’s mother, and the small bed in the side room is used for guests or if the owner has hired someone who needs a place to stay.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 5,400 pixels (18 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for the 5′ squares assumed for the design) or 140 pixels (for 10‘ foot squares) – so resizing the image to 1,260 pixels or 2,520 pixels wide, respectively.

 

Lava-Lamp-Monolith.jpg


Gath-Am’s Beacon

Deep purple light seems to bubble out of a strange tower in the Grim Highlands, the purple magical glow illuminating the area for 20 miles around with dark magical energies. The structure itself appears to be partially cut from an outcropping of stone some 319 feet tall (and the bubbling purple light “source” projects another hundred feet above it like some surreal lava lamp).

Raised from the stony badlands by the dragon Gath-Am Gerrulya’ak using one of the teeth of their beloved mate as the seed, the beacon glowed with mystical energy for the first week after it was pulled from the earth and then went dark for the last few hundred years. Dark druids of the highlands have been using it in the interim, and have either reactivated it, or just have the luck to be there as Gath-Am returns.

Sages of the City of Copper Bowls agree on one thing about the Beacon – it draws Gath-Am from across the worlds and should it return then none within striking distance of the Beacon will be safe from the dragon’s wrath. So someone has to go there and figure out how to dim the purple light.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,600 x 16800 pixels (32 x 56 squares). To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10‘ squares that make sense with the design) – so resizing the image to 2,240 x 3,920 pixels or 4,480 x 7,840 pixels, respectively.

 

The-Lost-Watch.jpg

The Lost Watch

A wee little watch tower once sat in the blue hills, overlooking a hamlet that was slowly dying. Then Zhole, a hundred other minor godlings, and the 77 Gods Trapped Between breached the division between worlds where a minor priest had begged for succour from the predations of the elves. The small hamlet became “The City of the Gods” and the world changed.

Today the Lost Watch is just another odd building within the walls of the city. While the old stone construction makes it obviously one of the pre-war buildings its location makes it unsuitable for its original purpose and the cramped interior makes it awkward for most other uses, so it has become home to a small “guild” of mercenaries. It doesn’t offer much housing for guild members passing through, but does have regular meals and serves as a message centre and small home base.

The main room on entering is fairly open, with storage on the far left along with a cot for a guild apprentice. A table with a map of the region is at the back of the room by the stairs into the tower proper. The eastern room serves as kitchen, dinning room, and bunks for the two guild members who maintain the tower.

The lowest level of the tower proper has two beds for members passing through, with racks of paperwork regarding guild business (mostly tracking tithes and provisions) taking up most of the walls. The second level of the tower serves as more long term / secure storage, and the locked room on the third floor is used for more sensitive guild business.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 10,200 x 5,100 pixels (34 x 17 squares). To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10‘ squares that make sense with the design) – so resizing the image to 2,380 x 4,760 pixels or 4,760 x 9,520 pixels, respectively.


 

The-Lame-Barghest.jpg


The Lame Barghest Tavern

The Lame Barghest is a drinking establishment of significant size – one of the better places to get a drink while in the City of Blue if you get along with the gangs that provide “law enforcement” in the neighbourhood.

The bar is tended by Joseph the Elder (rough, scarred, likes to talk but quick to judge) during the days and Joseph the Younger (unrelated) (long-haired, vibrant, wears a lot of simple jewelry) in the evenings – but the business is the property of Pakha Vouk (lean, weathered, has few words), an elf who can be found in the crowd here most evenings and many afternoons.

The Barghest serves alcohol primarily, but a pot of thin stew is kept over the fire for those who need warming up or who are unwilling to leave the bar for a meal.

The ground floor is mostly a “party space” – people come here to drink and meet friends and others into their cups. A few young toughs will typically set up at tables that give a good view of those coming and going and to establish a presence – this is generally ignored by management as long as they keep buying drinks and don’t cause trouble with each other (something they’ve learned not to do on the premises, keeping any real trouble for settling in the alleys and mud).

The upper level is quieter, with tables and semi-private booths overlooking the central area of the tavern. This is where a number of “fixers” and middlemen can usually be found – two different “major players” who operate in different markets are often found here, Dusty (young, high pitched, stylish) who arranges for thefts and the subsequent fencing of commercial property, and Brother Jonah (fatherly, slow-talking, dangerous) who operates a “family business” of racketeering, smuggling, and “enforcement”.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,000 pixels x 12,000 (30 x 40 squares). To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for the 5′ squares assumed for the design) or 140 pixels (for 10‘ foot squares) – so resizing the image to 2,100 x 2,800 pixels or 4,100 x 5,600 pixels, respectively.

 

Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
This is a really useful map. It kind of reminds me of a very old Dragon magazine (I think) miniatures-scale map of a tavern in the centerfold of the magazine, which I think had the same open second story (all the better for swinging down from on a chandelier rope).
 


Shadow-Church.jpg


The Sanctuary of Lament

This is one of the few remaining churches of the Lament of the Silver Lord – said to be the creator and protector of the two pale moons and the stars. The Silver Lord laments for the Sun, his true love denied. The church of the Lament seeks to comfort and honour the Silver Lord through hymns, rituals, and sacrifices of silver in the night.

The Lament of the Silver Lord has a hierarchical structure, with the Grand Vision (elderly, down to earth, pleasant but strict) as the leader and the Moon Singers as the clergy. The Grand Vision is claimed to be able to communicate directly with the Silver Lord, and thus guides the Moon Singers and followers with his divine will. The Moon Singers are the ones who perform the ceremonies and rituals, and they are taught the skills and formulae of the lunar magic that flows from the Silver Lord.

The church proper is a two-story structure with a smaller basement. The left side of the structure is the church & temple proper with pews, a small shrine off to the side, and a raised area for the Moon Singers to guide rituals. The grand stairs lead up to this area, but there is also a ramp off to one side for transporting in heavy materials as well as for those of the faith who find the stairs difficult. The right side of the structure is a library on the ground floor, and dormitory above.

Beneath the library is a basement with storage space for records (a lot of historical records of the movements of celestial bodies is kept here), and a pair of large rooms that are used as community spaces for various assemblies of both the faithful and for other groups needing a meeting space.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,300 x 15,600 pixels in size (31 x 52 squares). To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares that work with this design) – so resizing it to either 2,170 x 3,640 or 4,340 x 7,280 pixels, respectively.

 

Rhovan-House.jpg


Rhovan House

While nothing huge by any stretch, Rhovan House is obviously a well-to-do estate with stone foundations, ground floor, and supports at the corners on the second floor to hold up the slate roof. Off the side of the building is a single-story wooden expansion on a stone floor that now serves as the main access to the building.

Two staircases lead to the basements – one is outside the house on the north side – a door that leads to stairs into the main cellars used for storage of old furniture, preserves, and firewood; and another set of stairs in the entry chamber that leads down to the extended cellars that include a wine cellar, what appears to once have been a ritual / worship space or two, a smaller private shrine, and a crypt chamber housing the remains of the original owners of the house. The coffin holding Lady Rhovan also hides a secret door leading to deeper passages…

The second floor of the house is accessed via stairs in the cathedral-ceilinged great room – into a sitting room, the master bedroom, and a smaller bedroom & office. The second floor of the entrance add-on is a large patio where you can watch the city’s activities below.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,600 x 9,600 pixels in size (32 x 32 squares), with an assumed scale of 10 feet per square (based on the size of the beds and chairs in the rooms). To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares that work with this design) – so resizing it to either 2,240 x 2,240 or 4,480 x 4,480 pixels, respectively.

 

EPTemple-Upper.jpg


A Temple of Qón: and Guardian of the Gates of Hell.

Qón protects the soul against the perils of the hereafter and aids those attacked by the powers of the Dark. This small temple dedicated to the Cohort of Belkhánu provides “escorts” for funerals conducted by the associated temple, guarding against those who would disturb the righteous slumber of the dead (yes, they are looking at YOU, servants and necromancers of Sárku).

Entry to the temple is via a columned courtyard, with the main temple chamber having a tall vaulted ceiling and a balcony overlooking from the east end. At the west side of the chamber are statues of both Qón and Belkhánu in their most common strange, multi-limbed aspects. The east side of the structure is for administrative use, with chambers for documents and for administrative priests to conduct the day-to-day business of the temple.

Upstairs, the south side is where the high priests (administrative & ritual) have their shared dais to conduct their work and research, surrounded by lesser functionaries. The north chamber is for supplicants and for high-ranking attendees to the various rituals who pass through to the balcony on the left.

The basements (detailed in the next post) are accessible via a pair of ramps. Heavy goods that need to be stored or researched below are brought in via the north door which is level with the raised ground behind the temple unlike the other entrances which have stairs to get to them.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 10,200 x 13,200 pixels in size (34 x 44 squares). To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares that work with this design) – so resizing it to either 2,380 x 3,080 or 4,760 x 6,160 pixels, respectively.

 

Voidrunner's Codex

Remove ads

Top