5E March's D&D Book To Be Announced On January 9th

A mysterious entry has appeared on Amazon! With a product title of "Dungeons & Dragons March Release Book (Title announced January 9th)" and a release date of March 17th, 2020, this $49.95 hardcover release will be revealed in under a week!

Screen Shot 2020-01-06 at 10.49.53 AM.png


The description reads "Your first look at the next D&D title comes on January 9th! Keep an eye on wherever you get your D&D news for a preview of the book."

Could there be a clue in the dice being released on the same day? Laeral Silverhand's Explorer's Kit is described as "Dice and miscellany for the world's greatest roleplaying game" for $29.99. We'll find out on Thursday!

Screen Shot 2020-01-06 at 10.54.20 AM.png


Who's Laeral Silverhand? She's a prolific creator of magic items from Waterdeep, and one of the most powerful wizards in the Forgotten Realms. She's one of the Seven Sisters, introduced in 1987's Forgotten Realms boxed set, although Laeral herself wasn't described in that product. Ed Greenwood'sThe Seven Sisters supplement fully detailed them in 1995. Laeral and Khlben 'Blackstaff' Arunsun led a group called the Moonstars. In 5th edition, she appears in Waterdeep: Dragon Heist.
 
Russ Morrissey

Comments

Aebir-Toril

Creator of the Elfgrinder Mech
This is a cheap hobby, at least compared to other luxury hobbies. Anyone who console games regularly drops $50-100 on a new game and RPGs don't have a $300-$500 start up cost added on. Even someone who shoots pool is probably dropping the cost of a hardback in table rental every time they go to the pool hall. Once you count in the reuseability of RPG products the difference is pretty stark.
I'm an avid player of video games as well as D&D and other RPGs, so I can confirm this. I've dropped hundreds of dollars on computer components, and around $750 total on Switch, games, and controllers for the Switch.
 

FitzTheRuke

Adventurer
Dunno about "fear of offending" . . . I think of it more in positive terms --- a desire to include. And from a storytelling standpoint, it's just good to be open to these different perspectives and different influences, because it's all new ingredients to throw in the pot, right?
A desire to include is why they don't produce those settings? I think you may have misread what I was saying, or I didn't do a good job of explaining. Of course they should be respectful of any real-world societies that influence the settings. As often as possible they should look for different perspectives and influences. I'm just worried that we'll be stuck with pseudo-europe as our only setting because pseudo-south america or pseudo-china have been done badly in the past, and to revisit them, could be seen as problematic. I think that's throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
 

JPL

Adventurer
Well, I think they've already indicated that they're going to try again and do better on some multi-cultural stuff. But sure, it may be that one of the reasons that stuff hasn't happened yet is a concern that it will be closely scrutinized and perhaps controversial. Whether you call that a fear of doing it wrong or a desire to do it right is maybe a matter of perspective.

As an aside . . . 1970s superheroes are the best example of half-assed inclusion. The Super-Friends are an obvious example, but I love that when they were brainstorming names for X-Men, all they could think of was "Wagner" for the German guy and "Rasputin" for the Russian.
 

JPL

Adventurer
Butcher European history? Never.
I've been hip deep in "Pendragon" lately, and it's a weird riff on this --- built off of a combination of legend, literature, accurate history, inaccurate history (with varying degrees of inaccuracy), and stuff the author made up.
 

FitzTheRuke

Adventurer
Well, I think they've already indicated that they're going to try again and do better on some multi-cultural stuff. But sure, it may be that one of the reasons that stuff hasn't happened yet is a concern that it will be closely scrutinized and perhaps controversial. Whether you call that a fear of doing it wrong or a desire to do it right is maybe a matter of perspective.
It's probably a bit of both. It is nicer to think that it's the latter more than the former. Maybe I'm just feeling a bit cynical. I hope they do it, and do a good job of it, even if it takes more time, so there's that...

As an aside . . . 1970s superheroes are the best example of half-assed inclusion. The Super-Friends are an obvious example, but I love that when they were brainstorming names for X-Men, all they could think of was "Wagner" for the German guy and "Rasputin" for the Russian.
The New X-Men were terrible stereotypes in a lot of ways, but at the time, it was revolutionary that they weren't all just a bunch of Americans. At least the Irish guy wasn't named "Shamrock" and had "luck-powers". Though I guess Banshee wasn't much better than that. (That character actually exists at Marvel, though!)
 

Aebir-Toril

Creator of the Elfgrinder Mech
Yeah, $30 for high-use items like dice and handouts isn't really that much.
It's not much at all, especially considering the fact that people spend far more than that on headsets, mice, and monitors. It's not uncommon for people who game to spend thousands of dollars on their computer, accessories, monitor, special mouse (pssst, the mice are all pretty much the same), keyboard, and gaming chair.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Well, we know it's almost definitely not the big adventure book, as that usually gets heavier promotion at D&D Live, and not an earlier release.

In 2019, the book released early was GoS, a remake of old modules. In 2018, it was MToF, a monster book. In 2017 it was TftYP, another remake of modules. In 2016 it was CoS, another remake of Ravenloft.

I doubt it's a setting book so soon after Eberron. Probably not a player's book either, I'd expect the UAs to probably get more testing and be released around November.

I think it's probably Welch's book, of new adventures from 3rd party authors. Seems like something that would be easier to release for the team, and we know it's coming eventually.
 

gyor

Legend
Well, we know it's almost definitely not the big adventure book, as that usually gets heavier promotion at D&D Live, and not an earlier release.

In 2019, the book released early was GoS, a remake of old modules. In 2018, it was MToF, a monster book. In 2017 it was TftYP, another remake of modules. In 2016 it was CoS, another remake of Ravenloft.

I doubt it's a setting book so soon after Eberron. Probably not a player's book either, I'd expect the UAs to probably get more testing and be released around November.

I think it's probably Welch's book, of new adventures from 3rd party authors. Seems like something that would be easier to release for the team, and we know it's coming eventually.
I hope your wrong, it sounded aweful. But you could be right.

I will point out that not all Player options get playtested. And MTOF is one part monster book, one part Player option, but mostly it's a lore book.

And I don't buy that there haven't been time for the rescent UAs contents in the book. I suspect most of it was well reviewed so it could be in the book already, the rest just cut.

Whether there is enough time for it to end up in the book depends on if they believe it needs a second playtest of the content or not. I believe it likely doesn't.
 

Parmandur

Legend
I hope your wrong, it sounded aweful. But you could be right.

I will point out that not all Player options get playtested. And MTOF is one part monster book, one part Player option, but mostly it's a lore book.

And I don't buy that there haven't been time for the rescent UAs contents in the book. I suspect most of it was well reviewed so it could be in the book already, the rest just cut.

Whether there is enough time for it to end up in the book depends on if they believe it needs a second playtest of the content or not. I believe it likely doesn't.
UA Class content tends to be early drafts, before balance work is done. Crawford discussed the recent spat of UA material on Twitch yesterday, however, and we can safely rule that out for this book based on his statements. So this is not a Xanathar style book.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
I hope your wrong, it sounded aweful. But you could be right.
Considering how little info there actually is on it (All I've actually heard is that it is a collection of adventures) I am entirely reserving judgment. I'm cautiously optimistic as Wizard's has such a good track record of putting out content now, and they have such a good pool of 3rd party writers to pull from, that only the very best adventures made the cut.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Dunno about "fear of offending" . . . I think of it more in positive terms --- a desire to include. And from a storytelling standpoint, it's just good to be open to these different perspectives and different influences, because it's all new ingredients to throw in the pot, right?
As a cook, I hate the melting pot analogy. Also, it always implies assimilation, to me. Assimilation is about as morally gross as a random melting pot would be literally gross.
The hobby should be a cook out, instead. Everyone is invited except the bigots, and everyone can bring their own dishes and share with each other on their own terms.
 

JPL

Adventurer
As a cook, I hate the melting pot analogy. Also, it always implies assimilation, to me. Assimilation is about as morally gross as a random melting pot would be literally gross.
The hobby should be a cook out, instead. Everyone is invited except the bigots, and everyone can bring their own dishes and share with each other on their own terms.
Well, my metaphorical pot wasn't a melting pot. It was a stew pot. Throw some stuff in there and stir it up. And D&D is already a stew, baby.
 

Parmandur

Legend
As a cook, I hate the melting pot analogy. Also, it always implies assimilation, to me. Assimilation is about as morally gross as a random melting pot would be literally gross.
The hobby should be a cook out, instead. Everyone is invited except the bigots, and everyone can bring their own dishes and share with each other on their own terms.
Pedantic nerd moment: "melting pot" was not originally a culinary metaphors, bit a metallurgical metaphors. The "smelting pot" is part of the process for taking different metals and forming an alloy. Very different idea of integration of different cultures into one society, possibly also weird.

Given the recombinational nature of human culture and sexual reproduction, though, a big ol' funky stew is a pretty apt metaphor in the longterm.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Pedantic nerd moment: "melting pot" was not originally a culinary metaphors, bit a metallurgical metaphors. The "smelting pot" is part of the process for taking different metals and forming an alloy. Very different idea of integration of different cultures into one society, possibly also weird.

Given the recombinational nature of human culture and sexual reproduction, though, a big ol' funky stew is a pretty apt metaphor in the longterm.
sure, but in modern usage, it’s a culinary metaphor.
But either way, it implies assimilation, IMO, and this grossed me out pretty hard.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
My preferred replacement metaphor is a tossed salad. Everything gets mixed together in new and interesting ways, but while retaining more of their individual nature than a melting pot implies.
A good word for what we're talking about is bricolage, which means construction or creation from a diverse range of available things.
those are good, but I’m gonna stick with cookout. It’s already a good word for a community event that brings people together.
Growing up in an area where there are large populations of Hispanic, Black, South Asian, and East Asian, folks, cookouts are literally the best things ever.
 

Parmandur

Legend
sure, but in modern usage, it’s a culinary metaphor.
But either way, it implies assimilation, IMO, and this grossed me out pretty hard.
As someone with multicultural heritage, in a very diverse area where people are blending together, it is accurate though. Without institutions to prevent the course of nature, people will merge over time, analogous to soup ingredients.
 

Advertisement

In Our Store!

Advertisement

Top