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Marvel could publish DC.

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
...there's only so many countries that are next to the USA in North America and are not named Canada (Just the one).
I mean, technically St. Pierre/Miquelon is part of France; and might be considered "adjacent" to the US...

@MoonSong love your breakdown of all the different venues someone could get graphic fiction in your country. I didn't realize it was so fractured! Do people there love graphic fiction? Any home brewed material? I know Spain has a ton of great stuff...
 

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In Spain the comics shops are in the big cities, and geek/fanboys aren't common in the little towns. And now the comic shops are closed because the quarentene for the epidemic is not going to end soon.

Years ago the satiric cartoon magazine "El Jueves" (the Thusday), our own Charlie Hebo, was very popular, but now it's not cool, but only toxic, and very rude, propaganda. Without money from the state it had closed time ago.

Years ago some characters from kid-friendly cartoons were very popular, but today most of them are forgotten by the new generations. Some Spanish "action heroes" (Roberto Alcazar y Pedrin, Capitán Trueno, el Guerrero del Antifaz) were also very famous but now they are almost unknown among youngest generations. There was an action-movie based in a Spanish parody of Superman, Superlopez, but this has fallen in the oblivion, like the action movies of "Mortadelo Y Filemon", maybe the most popular Spanish cartoon franchise.

They most of Spanish fandom would rather manga. Dragon Ball and Naruto are more popular than DC superheroes, I would dare to say. And I guess thanks the 60's children cartoon but Marvel is more popular than DC. From the rest of Europe here Tintin and Axteris the Gaul are the most famous.
 
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MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
@MoonSong love your breakdown of all the different venues someone could get graphic fiction in your country. I didn't realize it was so fractured! Do people there love graphic fiction? Any home brewed material? I know Spain has a ton of great stuff...
I could write a book on the subject. -I might have or might do...-. Some highlights:

Back in the golden age there were daily anthologies with ongoing series that predated soap operas. In fact one writer managed to keep the rights to her creations and was lated adapted into actual soap operas. She's behind the infamous Memin Pinguin. Which started in the golden age, but everything that is currently reprinted dates from the silver age. I don't know which house is currently reprinting this character.

From the silver age, we had characters such as Kaliman, which started as a radio show, then moved to comics and had two films made. It currently receives new material from Kamite


Another Golden age book in eternal circculation is La Familia Burron


Now the interesting bits. From the early nineties we got Karmatron and los transformables. It is notorious that the original run is long out of print and the author decided to start over in the late 2000s



Now I want to tell you about two characters that are important on the convention circuit. First we have El Bulbo, he started as a mascot to the Conque convention. The author is still active, but mostly on the web:

The other character is "El Monito", part character and part avatar of his creator, the late Ruben Armenta. He wasn't the most talented of artists, but he had a lot of heart and was a beacon of the community. Many artists collaborated with him, and he impulsed them to collaboration. (Why is he next to the Thing? Because that's the name of a convention, la Mole -the local name of the Thing-).

20200428_194650.jpg


After the Death of Superman there was a boom of indie content. There are a lot of characters from that era. character such as Tetsuko la chica de acero, Siniestro cazador de Demonios, and antologies like Balam Comics. But the most successful new character was Meteorix, which managed to be in the newstands for over 90 numbers:



No other new comic has managed that. It ran from 2000 to 2007. By 2012 there were some comics in the newstands like Angel Caido, Aventuras Enmascaradas and overall SoulKeepers. Which managed a good run of about 18 numbers in two volumes


The boom came to an end when in 2012 Vid went out of business -Vid stores where the most important distribution channel for national content- and DC made new 52 and gave rights to a new publishing house -which was likely behind vid going out of business- these new 13 spots every week crowded out the new comics in newsstands -space on newsstands is at a premium-.

There was still a nationals only convention every year for a couple of years now, but it is gone now, and I haven't been to a convention in years, so I'm currently out of the loop.

Co-nationals in the web:

Pilli-Adventure

Comic Roomies from Hell

Dream keeper Robin -This is a reboot of a series that was originally published on a magazine-

Power Nap

Prometidas a Domicilio -Spanish only-
 
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Although Disney was divides into different parts, the true bosses would be together. It would work like a cartel or oligarchy.

And the people tires when somebody becomes too popular and then "old-fashion", because they want always new things.

And the fandom love the franchises, the characters, but not always the newest titles. Today people buy lot of graphic novels, but the young adult would rather novels, for example supernatural romance some years ago, teenage would rather videogames, and children cartoons. These may be good years for superheroes franchises, but not for printed paper version of comic about superheroes.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Now the interesting bits. From the early nineties we got Karmatron and los transformables. It is notorious that the original run is long out of print and the author decided to start over in the late 2000s

Karmatron looks like a mashup between Elfquest and Shogun Warriors...
 


MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
It is the first time I know those comics. They are Spanish language but not published in Spain.
I never considered how far they would have reached. I thought you'd know at least Memin Pinguin since it was published all over Latin America, and it was the subject of a controversy with the US:

Please tell me you know Condorito and Mafalda...(Both of South American origin...)
 

(I think it's better to be added here than starting a new thread).


AT&T Reportedly Looking to Sell Warner Bros' Gaming Division; EA, Activision, and More Interested


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I don't understand. Aren't they making money with Mortal Kombat?
 

Legatus_Legionis

< BLAH HA Ha ha >
It is not that they are not making money, it is they are not getting the expected rate of return on their IP products.

That is why DC Publishing had to break away from Diamond, and get product out ASAP. That are having to prove to AT&T the money they get from DC Publishing is worth keeping them.

They will keep the DC IP, so they can product TV shows and movies. But keeping publishing physical comics books themselves is them looking at maximizing the worth of that division.

If they can find someone to purchase a license to print them, that is money for nothing to them. But the price has to be right, or they will just sell the publication rights away or shut the publishing side down, and hope all the collectors of DC comics will want to have a temporary digital viewing of them.
 

I think still it may be possible. DC would keep the IPs, we can agree about this, and the comics would be a licencing, something like Hasbro or Disney/Star Wars with IDW Publishing. The first step to test the reaction of the fandom, I guess, would be a new crossover.

Other option could be a new sub-universe with a different power limits to allow be adapted into videogames.
 

MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
If they can find someone to purchase a license to print them, that is money for nothing to them. But the price has to be right, or they will just sell the publication rights away or shut the publishing side down, and hope all the collectors of DC comics will want to have a temporary digital viewing of them.
I don't think they will ever sell the DC publication rights. Licensing them is a possibility, but I doubt they would get rid of the characters, stories and plots. They are very important IP that is currently generating money just by being held on to without having to do a thing. Overseas reprinting licenses are a thing, and reprints of key books like the killing joke, watchmen, death of superman and crisis on infinite earths are still selling well every year, these are evergreen.

Selling the publication rights also means selling the control over the underlying IP. Movies, Tv shows, games, and park rides are all derivatives of an original IP that is in comic book form way back when neither of these media existed. The only reason Warner can exploit and sell and license these right now is because they own the right to the original media. No more control over the original media means they won't be able to license rights over any new kind of media that might emerge in the future.

Worst case scenario would be no more new comics are ever produced, and Warner keeps selling digital back issue and trade paper backs for another hundred years. On a better world, someone manages to pony up enough to purchase a license to make new comics and takes all of the risk. On the best of worlds, DC remains a thing, but in a reduced fashion, selling new stuff digitally and in weekly anthologies on Walmarts and maybe some grocery stores, maybe the direct market somehow manages to survive too.

I think still it may be possible. DC would keep the IPs, we can agree about this, and the comics would be a licencing, something like Hasbro or Disney/Star Wars with IDW Publishing. The first step to test the reaction of the fandom, I guess, would be a new crossover.

Other option could be a new sub-universe with a different power limits to allow be adapted into videogames.
It remains to be seen if IDW manages to survive this year. They've had a couple of bad years and were hanging from a thread even before the current crisis. Image doesn't do licenses, and Marvel's continued existence relies on Disney Money. Maybe Dark Horse could hope to get the rights some day?

Speaking of all this, which publisher has the DC rights in Spain? I know it used to be Novaro and then Norma, but they lost rights at some point of the last decade?
 


Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Back on topic, the original "rumor" (that DC Comics will start getting published by Marvel) is complete bull.

Could DC Comics get shuttered by AT&T? Sure. I can see that; comics might not be profitable in the future (I think it's way more likely they'll just restructure and publish fewer series in different formats, but full cancellation is possible).

But there's zero, ZERO possibility AT&T hands it to Marvel, even just comics publishing. They'll want to keep the licensing, the branding, the merchandise, and having shared ownership with the biggest media company in the world is a threat to that. No way does AT&T want to jeopardize its rights to Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman.

Comics may become unprofitable. But Batman alone has grossed $28 billion in media (second in super heroes to Spider Man, at $29 billion). So even if DC Comics ends, those characters aren't going anywhere.
 

Legatus_Legionis

< BLAH HA Ha ha >
I don't think they will ever sell the DC publication rights. Licensing them is a possibility, but I doubt they would get rid of the characters, stories and plots. They are very important IP that is currently generating money just by being held on to without having to do a thing. Overseas reprinting licenses are a thing, and reprints of key books like the killing joke, watchmen, death of superman and crisis on infinite earths are still selling well every year, these are evergreen.

Selling the publication rights also means selling the control over the underlying IP. Movies, Tv shows, games, and park rides are all derivatives of an original IP that is in comic book form way back when neither of these media existed. The only reason Warner can exploit and sell and license these right now is because they own the right to the original media. No more control over the original media means they won't be able to license rights over any new kind of media that might emerge in the future.
Not true.

Marvel sold the film rights to their characters decades ago, they still owned the IP, and right to print comics. To get the MCU to work, they had to start buying back the movie rights or how they would expire and them reverting back to Marvel by default.

But with the rise of online streaming services, the need to keep the IP is very important. But producing comic books is NOT. They can easily sell/license those rights to someone else.

Disney has done that a long time ago go its Disney characters, like Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, Scrooge McDuck, etc. Disney still OWNS the IP, the cartoons, movies, merchandising, etc. They just do not PRINT comics themselves. Likely DC Publishing can do the same way as Disney Publishing.

It remains to be seen if IDW manages to survive this year. They've had a couple of bad years and were hanging from a thread even before the current crisis. Image doesn't do licenses, and Marvel's continued existence relies on Disney Money. Maybe Dark Horse could hope to get the rights some day?
And that is what alot of comic book stores are worried about. The end of new physical comics books. Sure the publishers can reprint older stories (like they are now), but want more people to buy them digitally. Last time I looked the price of a new physical comic was the same as a digital one. But you can resell the physical one and it is still collectible. Digital does none of that. And since any digital media one only get a temporary license to view it, if they ever decide to stop offering them, (like titles are constantly being pulled from digital media sites like Amazon Prime, Netflix, etc) it is gone.

So the death of physical comic books IS the death of the modern comic book industry, IMO.

That both Marvel and DC are facing this dilemna. The films have not helped increase readership of they comic books the film's characters are based on. Why waste resources on something their higher-ups can get better return on investment elsewhere?

I do hope someone with get the publications rights to continue making physical comic books, and have a distributor(s) more reliable and produces less damages than what we have had in the past.

But we have seen how if something happens in the supply chain, everything is in jeopardy.
 

My opinion is the end of the old magazines of 24 or 48 pages may be near, but not the graphic novels. It would be like a miniserie is translated into other languange and it is in one tome as copilation.

And you know manga still is sold.

DC and Marvel don't like intercompany crossovers because later they have to agree again about to reprint new editions, or possible adaptation into other medias, for example toys, cartoons or videogames.
 

MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
Not true.

Marvel sold the film rights to their characters decades ago, they still owned the IP, and right to print comics. To get the MCU to work, they had to start buying back the movie rights or how they would expire and them reverting back to Marvel by default.

But with the rise of online streaming services, the need to keep the IP is very important. But producing comic books is NOT. They can easily sell/license those rights to someone else.

Disney has done that a long time ago go its Disney characters, like Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, Scrooge McDuck, etc. Disney still OWNS the IP, the cartoons, movies, merchandising, etc. They just do not PRINT comics themselves. Likely DC Publishing can do the same way as Disney Publishing.
Let me explain myself. In the case of Donald Duck, it doesn't matter if Disney sells the rights to comics -and I'm pretty sure they only licensed them-. The underlying IP comes from the movies, so they control the underlying IP. However, in the case of DC characters, Superman and Batman come from comics, if AT&T Warner sells the rights to the comics, they are selling the underlying IP. Even if they keep the rights to all other media and products currently existing, they lose the chance of monetizing the characters on any new media emerging in the future, because every existing and future media adaptations are derivatives of the comics because the comics are the original media for them.

Selling is not the same as licensing. DC can license the rights to the comics as many times as they want -in fact they do, as I was commenting with LuisCarlos17f, in my country they licensed those to Smash while in Spain Norma is the Licensee-, but selling them means they lose the money from those licenses too.
 
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