MCDM Update: The Power Roll


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Really? A D&D 5e caster likely has four or five spells prepared, plus some cantrips. A D&D spell seems to have more mental overhead than a MCDM power.
Yeah really - it's much higher than I would expect from a game like this re: different tables you have to consult. It's probably fine if they're presented in a power-card-type structure, all next to each other, but if they're all over the place, or some of the tables aren't inherently shown on the character sheet, then that'd be pretty bad. Also, if you've got 4-6 at L1, how many do you have in the mid-levels? How many in the high levels? A level 10 Wizard knows 15 spells, but I somehow don't think you'd be defending having to consult 15 different tables lol.
 


iirc they've said in a Q&A that they're going to spread that out across early levels, and 1st-level PCs will be simpler than the ones handed out in their first playtest.
That makes more sense, aha. I wish it was easier to find all this stuff, but Matt does seem to love having a bunch of info channels, some of which are pay-only. I don't really begrudge him, it's just a bit "Oh, I see...".
 




Staffan

Legend
Yeah really - it's much higher than I would expect from a game like this re: different tables you have to consult. It's probably fine if they're presented in a power-card-type structure, all next to each other, but if they're all over the place, or some of the tables aren't inherently shown on the character sheet, then that'd be pretty bad. Also, if you've got 4-6 at L1, how many do you have in the mid-levels? How many in the high levels? A level 10 Wizard knows 15 spells, but I somehow don't think you'd be defending having to consult 15 different tables lol.
Given that the tables will have the same structure, I don't see the problem. We're not talking Rolemaster-style tables here.

Look at, for example, 5e's thunderwave. The spell description says:

A wave of thunderous force sweeps out from you. Each creature in a 15-foot cube originating from you must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 2d8 thunder damage and is pushed 10 feet away from you. On a successful save, the creature takes half as much damage and isn't pushed.

Compare it to what a hypothetical similar MCDM power would look like:
A wave of thunderous force sweeps out from you. It affects each creature in a 3-square blast:
Meh: 2 sonic
Good: 4 sonic + push 2
Great: 6 sonic + push 2 + prone

Now, if each power had a different definition of what roll meant meh, good, and great, but I don't see the above as particularly complex. Now, you might argue that you could simplify the description of thunderwave when writing it on a sheet to something like: "15 ft cube, 2d8 thunder + knockback 10 ft, Con save half damage + negate knockback." But you could do the same with the MCDM version: "blast 3, 2 sonic/4 sonic + push 2/6 sonic + push 2 + prone."

I mean, I've played Pathfinder 2 where most spells have four different results, e.g. slow:
Critical Success The target is unaffected.
Success The target is slowed 1 for 1 round.
Failure The target is slowed 1 for 1 minute.
Critical Failure The target is slowed 2 for 1 minute.

And while PF2 is pretty rules-heavy, the different spell results is not where the majority of the cognitive load is. That comes in in a lot of other places.
 

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