D&D 5E Mordenkainens feedback.

Okay I have to ask just how much of change did they make of the elves, dwarves and halflings?
They changed most of the lore around the elves. I have ranted about it extensively lol. The only thing they really kept was that elves were born of Corellon's blood and the genderfluidy of the Seldarine.

Elves have always believed in reincarnation, but Arvandor was a reward. MToF however presents it as a temporary summer home, where elven spirits stay for a time, and then are reincarnated into elves because they are denied permeant residence in Arvandor due to what their ancestors (called the primal elves) did; some sided with Lolth, and as such, all are collectively punished. The pull to Arvandor and tie to Corellon remains strong, but reincarnation isn't a choice--it's forced on them.

There are other changes, too. I won't go in to all of them here--and don't get me started on the drow lol.
 

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Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
  • gith are actually a very good player race; I think it's only a matter of time before a high-profile gith character shows up and then everyone will be playing them. Baldur's Gate 3 may cause this.
Planescape Torment had a great Gith and that was 20 ish years ago so...
 


Seriously, the vast majority of the people I know who only play and never DM (which is a lot of people) don't buy any of the books. At most, a few of the most dedicated ones get the Player's Handbook. Zero of them would buy Mordenkainen's.
strange I only play but I buy all the lore and monster books.
 



Burnside

Space Jam Confirmed
Supporter
it ended up a cult hit which is better than nothing.

Of course. But Dak'kon being in a game that was a cult hit 22 years ago when most of today's players were not born yet or were small children is not significant compared to what would happen with gith if somebody played one on Critical Role.
 

Of course. But Dak'kon being in a game that was a cult hit 22 years ago when most of today's players were not born yet or were small children is not significant compared to what would happen with gith if somebody played one on Critical Role.
gods, that makes me feel old but must mean your older.
 





Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
Of course. But Dak'kon being in a game that was a cult hit 22 years ago when most of today's players were not born yet or were small children is not significant compared to what would happen with gith if somebody played one on Critical Role.
all I was saying is that a character in a video game may not be enough to propel a race to RPG popularity.
 


Burnside

Space Jam Confirmed
Supporter
all I was saying is that a character in a video game may not be enough to propel a race to RPG popularity.

It will if the video game is actually a hit, unlike Planescape: Torment. I never understood the appeal of Misc and Boo, but here we are 23 years later and the characters are still popular because a TON of people bought Baldur's Gate and Baldur's Gate 2. Comparatively speaking, nobody knows who Dak'kon is.
 
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Gorg

Explorer
Just curious: why e-bay? All the 5e books area still available from Amazon and other retailers.
Most of what I was looking for was 3E stuff to fill out my collection- primarily FR books. Plus nifty old stuff like early edition character sheets, BECMI sets, etc. I grabbed up books for 5E, because a) they were there, and I could; and b) They're WAY cheaper than they sell for at my local game store. ($50/pop last time I went and bought one...)

Also, not a fan of Amazon.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
The content in Mordenkainen's is more than a little unfocused. We have devils, demons, and gith on one hand, which neatly fit into a "planar monsters" category, then... halflings, dwarves, and elves. Huh?
It's a book about cosmic conflicts, with a chapter on the two races that never seem to be involved in any cosmic conflicts.

Makes sense .
 

Seriously, the vast majority of the people I know who only play and never DM (which is a lot of people) don't buy any of the books. At most, a few of the most dedicated ones get the Player's Handbook. Zero of them would buy Mordenkainen's.
Yep. I've been tempted at times to require players to buy a PHB if they want to play after a few introductory sessions. Everyone in our group can afford one and should but for some reason players generally want to just show up and play while giving zero thought to their characters in between sessions.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Seriously, the vast majority of the people I know who only play and never DM (which is a lot of people) don't buy any of the books. At most, a few of the most dedicated ones get the Player's Handbook. Zero of them would buy Mordenkainen's.
Wild! My players all have copies of several books, including a few adventures. Definitely into the lore and thinking about their character between sessions.

I think the hobby in general is a mix of your players and mine, but enough are like mine that these books keep topping the book sales charts on Amazon, flying off FLGS shelves, etc. IMO you can’t explain that as just DMs.
In its defense:

  • Lots of the monsters are great
  • The variant tieflings are very cool and do add a lot of options for mechanical creativity to that race
  • gith are actually a very good player race; I think it's only a matter of time before a high-profile gith character shows up and then everyone will be playing them. Baldur's Gate 3 may cause this.
also, the lore for gnomes was actually decent. They’re the only one, I think, but it’s something! (Okay, really it’s just elves and dwarves they messed up, and the Halfling stuff is...kinda meh and unnecessary)
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
also, the lore for gnomes was actually decent. They’re the only one, I think, but it’s something! (Okay, really it’s just elves and dwarves they messed up, and the Halfling stuff is...kinda meh and unnecessary)
I personally love the Elf & Dwarf material, though the Halfling stuff is pretty forgettable.
 

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