D&D 5E Multi-Multi-classing

Horwath

Hero
With 2 levels of warlock and decent cha, you can work almost any multiclass beacause you can always fall back to "blast spamming"

6th level paladin/2 warlock/X sorcerer can be real powerhouse
 

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rgoodbb

Adventurer
Out of curiosity, and because it would be the best way to help you, what 3-class are you considering? What is the concept you are aiming for?

Floki from Vikings with added land and environmental spells from the old gods and also some trickster stuff as well as a little support

He has to be melee viable (not tank) with some form of damage mitigation (5 Rogue at least)

Land Druid and Rogue are the base classes I think, and Bard and maybe even a little Fighter

I was considering Dex/Wis/Cha and something in Con. getting 14's in those is viable.

I know people will shout Arcane Trickster at me but don't really want to add Int to the mix. Landing a Suggestion spell feels reasonably important so at least 3 levels of Bard.

I have thought of many ways to do this with two classes (Paladin/Bard, Tempest/Ranger) etc. but it does not feel complete.

I know that's asking a lot for one build but I'm most interested in what I will give up
 

TwoSix

Unserious gamer
If you've got access to UA material, Stone Sorcerer 1/Hexblade Warlock 1/Cha Class X can be a fun start. Good hit points and profs, unarmored AC based on Con, melee attacks based on Cha. It's an obvious SorLock combo, but you can use it to spice up a combo with a lot of classes.
 

nswanson27

First Post
Hey folks.

I wouldn’t mind getting a take on people's experiences who have multi-classed their PC’s into at least three classes. I am looking at a build with three classes to fully capture a flavour but am mindful of
M.A.D., ASI issues and potentially feeling underpowered compared to other PC's.

What are people’s experiences with 3 or more classes in one? (especially M.A.D. builds) How did they feel to play?

Cheers, for your time and replies.

I have a char with 4 classes (rogue assassin, shadow monk, hunter ranger, arcane cleric (Mask as deity)). He's fun. Very versatile. Designed to get into back ranks and shut them down quickly.
Certain sub-classes thematically go well together as well as mechanically. I would say hold out on going too crazy till higher levels though.
 
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zaratan

First Post
Just plan the entire build from the level you start until the level he need to work as planned. If look like you losing more than you winning great part of the time, don't do it.
Some frankensteins multiclasses really don't work if you start at level 1, because you need to reach lvl 9+ to shine, but is way under average before reach that, sometimes just change the multiclass order that will be better. Others multiclasses had a lower level work point or can be fairly functional before reach the planned level.

Like, you go until level 5 of ranger to get extra attack and 2nd lvl spell, than go more 3 (4 if you need ASI) as assassin and after more 3 (or 4) as battlemaster fighter. You delayed you ASI in just one level and had a functional character all the time.
But if you would want to start as fighter 3, than get 3 of assassin and finish with 5 as ranger, this probably would be a worse choice, since you got your first ASI at level 10 and extra attack only at 11.
 

Corwin

Explorer
One of my favorite PCs thus far, playing 5e, is my half-elven holy assassin. Raised in the ancient, high elf church, eventually recruited into their semi-secret order of mystical (not the class) assassins, the Order of the Unseen. Touched with gifts from the Queen of Air & Darkness herself, they hone themselves into living weapons, and are fanatically loyal to their sylvan faith. Agents tasked with doing the things, sometimes unsavory but necessary, to ensure the church's continued influence and power.

Anyway, he's got the acolyte background and a conglomeration of three classes. IMO they all provide various cool bits and pieces that give me the flavor and elements I am looking for in the concept.

Right now he's up to Assassin 3 / Shadow Monk 6 / Feypact Tomelock 3. And he's been so much fun to play.
 

jurrubin

Villager
Fast forward to the year 2022..I'm running a Swashbuckling Hexblade of Vengeance (Rogue 3/Warlock 3/Paladin 5) Wood Elf that is THE devastatingly best all-around character I've run since I started playing D&D 'way back in 1977.

Seriously.

No, he's not able to out-damage a pure Barbarian Fighter or a Goliath Paladin but he's not supposed to. What he IS able to do is keep up with any other character build (front line, stealth, healer), heal them of wounds and disease, zip around the battlefield massively disrupting enemy attacks, survive attacks that have trashed single-class members of his party (yay, Shield spell!), and, more often than not, dish out a nova attack that can shock a DM.
 
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Fast forward to the year 2022..I'm running a Swashbuckling Hexblade of Vengeance (Rogue 3/Warlock 3/Paladin 5) Wood Elf that is THE devastatingly best all-around character I've run since I started playing D&D 'way back in 1977.

Seriously.

No, he's not able to out-damage a pure Barbarian Fighter or a Goliath Paladin but he's not supposed to. What he IS able to do is keep up with any other character build (front line, stealth, healer), heal them of wounds and disease, zip around the battlefield massively disrupting enemy attacks, survive attacks that have trashed single-class members of his party (yay, Shield spell!), and, more often than not, dish out a nova attack that can shock a DM.
How are you using shield? That's only available to Sorcerers and Wizards, and isn't one of the schools for Arcane Trickster. Being level 11, have you not noticed any issues with having no higher than 18 Cha?
 

Rabulias

the Incomparably Shrewd and Clever
How are you using shield? That's only available to Sorcerers and Wizards, and isn't one of the schools for Arcane Trickster. Being level 11, have you not noticed any issues with having no higher than 18 Cha?
Arcane Tricksters get 3 1st level wizard spells at 3rd level. Two of them must be from the enchantment or illusion schools, but the third spell can be any wizard spell. Shield is a common choice for this third spell for ATs. They also can add a spell from any school at 8th, 14th, and 20th level (not that that matters in this case).
 

Arcane Tricksters get 3 1st level wizard spells at 3rd level. Two of them must be from the enchantment or illusion schools, but the third spell can be any wizard spell. Shield is a common choice for this third spell for ATs.
Ah, alright then.

Adding up the numbers, 6 first-level slots and 4+2×(# short rests) second-level slots per day is...not much. I'm skeptical about whether it is the multiclass that is the power here.
 



Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Ah, alright then.

Adding up the numbers, 6 first-level slots and 4+2×(# short rests) second-level slots per day is...not much. I'm skeptical about whether it is the multiclass that is the power here.
Yeah, I often find that few encounters per day hides many sins of multiclassed characters. Be it few spell slots, or something like having 3 rages and being able to count on rage in every combat.

Fast forward to the year 2022..I'm running a Swashbuckling Hexblade of Vengeance (Rogue 3/Warlock 3/Paladin 5) Wood Elf that is THE devastatingly best all-around character I've run since I started playing D&D 'way back in 1977.
Hexblade and Warlock 2-3 are the most multiclass friendly dips to take. CHR to a weapon, Shield spell, EB with invocations, etc.

Paladin 2-3 is also one, for smites and such. And Rogue or Bard 2 for skill monkey plus other bonuses. (Cleric 1 is also a great dip for proficiencies and spells like Bless.)

This speaks to taking the right classes that have great dips, not to triple-multiclassing in general. You built well - this is a high end triple classed character. Miss out on good dips (and play a good number of encounters per day as mentioned up top) and triple multiclassing shows it's weaknesses until your character level is in the teens.

Also, to delve deeper:
1. What class(es) had you picked at level 5? It's the lower levels where multiclassing really leaves characters behind other characters, missing out on ASI and the level 5 power bump. Was it all 5 levels of Paladin, or perhaps Warlock 2-3 and an EB focus while everything else came together?
2. Did you roll ability scores and do well? Because for a MAD character (wanting DEX, CHR, and decent CON), at 11th level you only have a single ASI really should hurt at this point.
 



aco175

Legend
It would be fun sitting at 3/3/3 and feeling sucky compared to the rest of the party and then go 4/4/4 for all the ASIs and then 5/5/5 for all the power bumps.
 

NotAYakk

Legend
Fast forward to the year 2022..I'm running a Swashbuckling Hexblade of Vengeance (Rogue 3/Warlock 3/Paladin 5) Wood Elf that is THE devastatingly best all-around character I've run since I started playing D&D 'way back in 1977.

Seriously.

No, he's not able to out-damage a pure Barbarian Fighter or a Goliath Paladin but he's not supposed to. What he IS able to do is keep up with any other character build (front line, stealth, healer), heal them of wounds and disease, zip around the battlefield massively disrupting enemy attacks, survive attacks that have trashed single-class members of his party (yay, Shield spell!), and, more often than not, dish out a nova attack that can shock a DM.
First, Barbarian doesn't get any damage features worth mentioning after level 5.

I'm very surprised you aren't Paladin 6; cha to all saves in a 10' aura is crazy good. With Hexadin, you can even attack with Charisma, so it can be your high stat.

After you have Warlock 3/Paladin 6, you can have fun with extra stuff. Usually you'd want to go for spell slots, however, to fuel your smites better, or a more reliable source of advantage.

If you are an elf or half elf, then getting advantage plus a 19-20 crit range is very fun with that build; 27% crit rate per swing means you can deliver almost all of your smites on crits.

Rogue 3 is adding a bit of mobility to the build, but not much damage I suspect. I'd have gone AT for the +1 spell casting level (well, I'd first go Paladin 6 for cha-to-saves).

But those are just tweaks.
 

First, Barbarian doesn't get any damage features worth mentioning after level 5.

I'm very surprised you aren't Paladin 6; cha to all saves in a 10' aura is crazy good. With Hexadin, you can even attack with Charisma, so it can be your high stat.

After you have Warlock 3/Paladin 6, you can have fun with extra stuff. Usually you'd want to go for spell slots, however, to fuel your smites better, or a more reliable source of advantage.

If you are an elf or half elf, then getting advantage plus a 19-20 crit range is very fun with that build; 27% crit rate per swing means you can deliver almost all of your smites on crits.

Rogue 3 is adding a bit of mobility to the build, but not much damage I suspect. I'd have gone AT for the +1 spell casting level (well, I'd first go Paladin 6 for cha-to-saves).

But those are just tweaks.
Yeah, generally agreed. Hexblade 3/Paladin 8 would likely have been a more potent combo overall with minimal to zero loss of flexibility. I'm not really sure those Rogue levels are doing very much other than sneaky skills...which there are much less expensive methods to acquire (like...spending the feat you get at Paladin 4.) If you've a generous DM who lets you take a feat at first level, you could even do Con 16/Cha 15 and grab Elven Accuracy. The vast majority of Rogue skill benefits are front-loaded or massively back-loaded. Expertise in two skills (or one skill + Thieves' Tools) is actually quite a bit for a single-level dip, but 2nd level is literally just Cunning Action which is not worth a level in and of itself, and 3rd is subclass and Steady Aim.

I derped and forgot that they specified Swashbuckler. Fancy Footwork isn't bad per se, but isn't particularly great either; the real draw is the +Cha to Initiative, which makes the character very nearly SAD: Hexblade gives +Cha to attack, Swashbuckler gives +Cha to Initiative, and Paladin 6 (when it happens) will give +Cha to saves. Long as you have the Strength to wear heavy armor and acceptable Constitution for HP, this character will only care about Charisma going forward--which is still a bit of a bitter pill to swallow given the one ASI they've gotten thus far, but it's not the worst thing. Getting Warlock 4 (since Rogue 4 gives nothing but an ASI, while Warlock 4 gives that and a cantrip and another spell known) would finally bump that Cha up to 20...and you'd only be a level 13 character!

It's not the worst combo in the world. Rogue 1 is a great dip, Warlock 3 is a great dip, Paladin is a great class for multiclassing with Cha-based casters. Swashbuckler partially compensates for the otherwise-disappointing benefits of Rogue 2 and 3. I still think the poster above is in a situation where other factors are the major contributor (frankly, it sounds like their DM is, likely unintentionally, throwing softballs and shocked by the results; this isn't hard in 5e, because the line between "not actually giving the players a challenge" and "overwhelming the players" is all too often treacherously thin.)

You probably missed the part where he said "all-around" and where he says he can't outdamage a barbarian.
And then went on to list how they're a better tank than anyone else in the party, doing excellent healing on par with or better than a dedicated healer, and dishing out Big Dong Damage novas sufficient to make the DM's eyes pop. Power is very clearly one of the goals here.
 

the Jester

Legend
Hey folks.

I wouldn’t mind getting a take on people's experiences who have multi-classed their PC’s into at least three classes. I am looking at a build with three classes to fully capture a flavour but am mindful of
M.A.D., ASI issues and potentially feeling underpowered compared to other PC's.


What are people’s experiences with 3 or more classes in one? (especially M.A.D. builds) How did they feel to play?

Cheers, for your time and replies.

I play a cleric/fighter/magic-user in a friend's campaign. I'm currently 3/1/3, so if I was single classed I would have 4th level spells. However, instead, I have a character who always has a reaction for enemy attacks, who may be limited to 2nd level spells but who can maximize the damage of my chromatic orb or shatter, and who has a bunch of bonus action options, allowing me to have really good action economy.

I have traded 4th level spells, or a fighter subclass features, for a very wide and versatile set of options (some custom/homebrewed) that let me focus on lightning, thunder, and action economy optimization. I'm a fairly tactical and analytical player, so having lots of options pays off for me. I am a good judge of when to e.g attack an enemy's AC vs. when to cast a spell against a given stat, I have a lot of ally-aiding things going on, and I am good at team work.

I definitely don't feel underpowered; comparing myself to the party's other level 7 members, I feel like I come in less specialized, but very good at what I do.

Every time I level up, I have a major debate over what class to take. Next time- coming probably after next session- I am leaning toward wizard, but I don't know... Action Surge is so amazing, I have to take fighter 2 at some point.

For the record, I am a storm priest/divination wizard, and I haven't decided what fighter subclass to eventually take.
 

And then went on to list how they're a better tank than anyone else in the party, doing excellent healing on par with or better than a dedicated healer, and dishing out Big Dong Damage novas sufficient to make the DM's eyes pop. Power is very clearly one of the goals here.
I read it different. Versality is power. Having the ability to nova once in a while is power.

Sustained damage is a different kind of power, which is porably the barbarian and the pure paladin´s expertise.

Warlock Hexblade (including the shield spell you seemed to be unaware of) is undoubtedly a very strong multiclass option combined with paladin, especially if you interpret the multiclass rules that you can power smites with warlock spells, which is not cristal clear, as multiclass rules only allow cross casting of spells between spellcasting and pact magic, and I tend to say, it was not designed that way (the first printing of the PHB explicitel spelled out paladin slots for smiting).
 

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