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D&D 5E Official Candlekeep Mysteries Announcement & Info About 'The Canopic Being' Adventure

The official announcement of the book that was revealed yesterday includes an image of the alternate cover. Clint Cearley did the standard cover and Simen Meyer did the alternate cover.

It looks like this isn't the book spearheaded by Kate Welch and featuring Marisha Ray and Deborah Ann Woll, as they don't feature on the list of designers.

The hardcover book will be available on March 16th for $49.95, and the alternate cover will be available from local game stores. Instead, the press releases describe it as a "New Book Full of Short Adventures from Up-and-Coming Designers".

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An anthology of seventeen mystery-themed adventures for the world’s greatest roleplaying game.

Candlekeep attracts scholars like a flame attracts moths. Historians, sages, and others who crave knowledge flock to this library fortress to peruse its vast collection of books, scribbled into which are the answers to the mysteries that bedevil them. Many of these books contain their own mysteries—each one a doorway to adventure. Dare you cross that threshold?

Candlekeep Mysteries is a collection of seventeen short, stand-alone D&D adventures designed for characters of levels 1-16. Each adventure begins with the discovery of a book, and each book is the key to a door behind which danger and glory await. These adventures can be run as one-shot games, plugged into an existing Forgotten Realms campaign, or adapted for other campaign settings.

This book also includes a poster map of the library fortress and detailed descriptions of Candlekeep and its inhabitants.

Adventure writers include: Graeme Barber, Kelly Lynne D’angelo, Alison Huang, Mark Hulmes, Jennifer Kretchmer, Daniel Kwan, Adam Lee, Ari Levitch, Sarah Madsen, Christopher Perkins, Michael Polkinghorn, Taymoor Rehman, Derek Ruiz, Kienna Shaw, Brandes Stoddard, Amy Vorpahl, and Toni Winslow-Brill.

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WotC's announcement on Facebook includes additional writers not mentioned on the product page -- Hannah Rose, and Chris Lindsay. I asked the company who does WotC's press stuff and they confirmed that they contributed but not as authors.


The Canopic Being
One of the adventures, by Jennifer Kretchmer, is called The Canopic Being. It's 10-12 pages, designed for a single session.

Like all the adventures it starts in Candlekeep, the greatest library in the Forgotten Realms, and features a dungeon located in Tashalar far to the south of the Sword Coast. As a wheelchair user, Kretchmer's adventure is a dungeon crawl beneath the earth, filled with fantasy elevators and ledges accessible by ramps.

The word "Canopic" refers to ancient Egyptian vases or jars often used during the mummification process. Canopic jars store and preserve the body's internal organs.
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Al'Kelhar

Adventurer
Ramps have been features of dungeons ever since the game was invented.

Although, to be fair, most ramps in dungeons are coated in some sort of frictionless, flammable and/or toxic slime, and end in you falling into a spiked pit or gaol cell.

Cheers, Al'kelhar
 


I'd wager something similar is at play here.

Yeah I suspect that too. I once designed a dungeon that would have been entirely wheelchair-accessible without the PCs having to intervene with winches and so on (which they also have to with Centaurs and the like of course), and it was because the people who owned this dungeon were basically wheeling stuff around it the whole time (I forget exactly why but there were a lot of fancy wheelbarrows involved).
 

Marandahir

Crown-Forester
Yeah I suspect that too. I once designed a dungeon that would have been entirely wheelchair-accessible without the PCs having to intervene with winches and so on (which they also have to with Centaurs and the like of course), and it was because the people who owned this dungeon were basically wheeling stuff around it the whole time (I forget exactly why but there were a lot of fancy wheelbarrows involved).
Now you've got me wanting to build a dungeon designed for the Wheelers from Return to Oz, and I've got shivers just thinking about it!
 

One of the adventures, by Jennifer Kretchmer, is called The Canopic Being. It's 10-12 pages, designed for a single session.

As a wheelchair user, Kretchmer's adventure is a dungeon crawl beneath the earth, filled with fantasy elevators and ledges accessible by ramps.

Cue the usual enraged idiots boycotting it on the ground of 'Political correctness gone mad!'
 




Lefi2017

Explorer
I was excited at first but now the more I hear the less I`M looks like a vanity project for activists I will wait for the online reviews.
That drift more into third party stuff WotC seems to be hit and miss lately.
Let's see how good the maps are also I wonder how that dungeon came to be with all the ramps and elevators.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I was excited at first but now the more I hear the less I`M looks like a vanity project for activists I will wait for the online reviews.
That drift more into third party stuff WotC seems to be hit and miss lately.
Let's see how good the maps are also I wonder how that dungeon came to be with all the ramps and elevators.
Same way as the pyramids did I guess. Let me make it very clear that this is not the forum in which to complain about inclusivity. There are plenty of dark corners of the web where you can do that. This is not one of them.
 

Lefi2017

Explorer
Challenging moderation
Same way as the pyramids did I guess. Let me make it very clear that this is not the forum in which to complain about inclusivity. There are plenty of dark corners of the web where you can do that. This is not one of them.
First, very bad misread. Some of the writers are activists (not a judgment).
Second, I talk about the dungeon ecology, why things are there, and why these monsters are there. In a fantasy game, you can do anything, but it has to be internally consistent. I actually want to know why that stuff is there, is it because the main villain uses it, or is it a kind of storehouse or shipping station? I rather think the term dungeon is misused here and just a reference to the battle map of a building.
Please don't assume the worst in people.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
First, very bad misread. Some of the writers are activists (not a judgment).
Second, I talk about the dungeon ecology, why things are there, and why these monsters are there. In a fantasy game, you can do anything, but it has to be internally consistent. I actually want to know why that stuff is there, is it because the main villain uses it, or is it a kind of storehouse or shipping station? I rather think the term dungeon is misused here and just a reference to the battle map of a building.
Please don't assume the worst in people.
The phrase “vanity project for activists” rather belies that. But that’s by the by. Don’t argue with moderators, please. And don’t post again in this thread.
 
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