Level Up (A5E) Purchasing, Carrying, and Expiring Supply

Stalker0

Legend
All very good points, though regarding the alcohol, it only takes a small amount to kill bacteria in water so long as the source is reasonably fresh (running water or melted snow), so even a relatively small supply of strong spirits can go a long way in 'freshening up' any water scavenged along the way.
That is actually a myth pushed by many movies and the like.

True disinfecting concentrations are more like 70% alcohol (140 proof), and even that won't kill certain bacteria that can turn to spores. Anything lower than that can't be counted on to disinfect.
 

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Rune

Once A Fool
That is actually a myth pushed by many movies and the like.

True disinfecting concentrations are more like 70% alcohol (140 proof), and even that won't kill certain bacteria that can turn to spores. Anything lower than that can't be counted on to disinfect.
To be fair, though: “That is actually a myth pushed by many movies and the like” is a pretty good definition of D&D.
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
being fair to the use alchohol to make water safe trope, it does have some historical underpinnings. The french used to give soldiers absinthe for that purpose to up the odds of it being safe/morale/etc. While not being hallucinogenic, it is well over 100 proof & quite good when prepared properly. :D
 



MarkB

Legend
That is actually a myth pushed by many movies and the like.

True disinfecting concentrations are more like 70% alcohol (140 proof), and even that won't kill certain bacteria that can turn to spores. Anything lower than that can't be counted on to disinfect.
I don't know from movies. I'm going from historical examples of things like grog, watered wine and small beer, where diluted alcoholic drinks are used because if you just drink the water it'll make you ill.

A 70% solution of alcohol would be useless for hydration - the alcohol content would dehydrate you.
 

Stalker0

Legend
I don't know from movies. I'm going from historical examples of things like grog, watered wine and small beer, where diluted alcoholic drinks are used because if you just drink the water it'll make you ill.

A 70% solution of alcohol would be useless for hydration - the alcohol content would dehydrate you.
All true, but science is pretty clear on this one. We can literally looking the bacteria under microscope with the introduction of alcohol, and see how it effects (or doesn't effect) them.

In many cases its not the alcohol per say but the process of making the alcoholic drink that lead to a reduction in bacteria. For example, beer making often involves boiling.

Another example, the classic "pour whisky on a wound" to disinfect it.... doesn't work. Again, the alchohol must be very strong to have disinfecting properties.
 

MarkB

Legend
All true, but science is pretty clear on this one. We can literally looking the bacteria under microscope with the introduction of alcohol, and see how it effects (or doesn't effect) them.

In many cases its not the alcohol per say but the process of making the alcoholic drink that lead to a reduction in bacteria. For example, beer making often involves boiling.

Another example, the classic "pour whisky on a wound" to disinfect it.... doesn't work. Again, the alchohol must be very strong to have disinfecting properties.
And yet, historically, this did work. Navy grog was water with some rum poured into it, and it lasted through weeks-long voyages when water would not.

For game purposes, maybe a two step process - boil the water first to purify it, then add some alcohol to retard the build-up of bacteria.
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
I think the debate here comes from @Stalker0 's correct scientific position that a small amount of alcohol won't fully disinfect, but it's absolutely historical fact that humans used a small amount of alcohol to make water that would otherwise make you sick into something that one could drink.

Strong stomachs is likely also a factor here.
 



Faolyn

(she/her)
I don't know from movies. I'm going from historical examples of things like grog, watered wine and small beer, where diluted alcoholic drinks are used because if you just drink the water it'll make you ill.

A 70% solution of alcohol would be useless for hydration - the alcohol content would dehydrate you.
Not an expert, but that's less "water with alcohol in it" and more "water that's been brewed," which is different. The former sounds like either a diluted alcoholic drink or like you're using alcohol as one of those iodine water purification tablets.

Hmm... prestidigitation can be used to heat or cool something. Can it get water hot enough to boil it, thus rendering it safe to drink?
 

MarkB

Legend
Not an expert, but that's less "water with alcohol in it" and more "water that's been brewed," which is different. The former sounds like either a diluted alcoholic drink or like you're using alcohol as one of those iodine water purification tablets.

Hmm... prestidigitation can be used to heat or cool something. Can it get water hot enough to boil it, thus rendering it safe to drink?
P:robably not, or people would already be exploiting it for damage-dealing effects. Maybe create bonfire or produce flame for the heating, then prestidigitation or control water to cool it down quickly to drinkable temperature afterwards.
 


Rune

Once A Fool
Not an expert, but that's less "water with alcohol in it" and more "water that's been brewed," which is different. The former sounds like either a diluted alcoholic drink or like you're using alcohol as one of those iodine water purification tablets.

Hmm... prestidigitation can be used to heat or cool something. Can it get water hot enough to boil it, thus rendering it safe to drink?
Pretty sure prestidigitation only says it “warms” something for up to an hour. On the other hand, it can instantly ignite a small campfire.

Taken together, those seem to imply prestidigitation cannot sustain enough heat long enough to bring water to a boil.
 

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