D&D 5E Radiant Citadel Free Preview On D&D Beyond

If you have a D&D Beyond account you can access a free promotional supplement for Journeys Through The Radiant Citadel. It contains noteworthy sites, information on life in the citadel, and details about some of its groups and defenses.

The Radiant Citadel is a city that serves as a bastion of hope for the weary and the displaced. Adventurers journey here to rest between quests and to learn from peoples that have moved here from across the multiverse. Now you can bring the Radiant Citadel to your table by unlocking the first chapter of Journeys Through the Radiant Citadel at no cost!

This claim unlocks the contents of this promotional supplement for use with D&D Beyond, including the supplement in digital format in the game compendium and in the searchable listings, character builder, encounters, and digital sheet.

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overgeeked

B/X Known World
According to this article, each adventure does come with its own pronunciation guide!

The bit that caught my eye was "the book will also see the return of monsters from previous iterations of Dungeons & Dragons, including first and second edition."

Hmm...
 




Parmandur

Book-Friend
The bit that caught my eye was "the book will also see the return of monsters from previous iterations of Dungeons & Dragons, including first and second edition."

Hmm...
IIRC, there something like 14 new Momsters stat blocks in the book, give or take a couple. I can easily imagine some 1E-2E obscurity thst is actually relevant to one of the culture presented in the book, and thst the writers here might feel mote comfortable bringing something culturally specific back than WotC in general has been.
 


I'd add Deep Space 9 as well.
Despite the stuff on the House of the Prophets, I don't think DS9 really tapped into the mythic (some might say pretentious) feel of Babylon 5, whereas Mass Effect and Radiant Citadel do. JMS was open about being inspired by Tolkien and Moorcock.

Just taking the space station story SF subgenre in general, it's older than B5. I've read a couple that date back to the 60s and 70s. Not so much on TV, although one might put Space 1999 and a few Doctor Who stories in there.
ETA: But, considering the variability of the other portals, maybe it's also a bit Stargate.
In terms of story structure, it looks like Radiant Citadel will be very Stargate (TV show) like. We have a home base, from which we visit a series of different planets of the week.

It's occurred to me that Radiant Citadel is visiting themes usually associated with the science fiction genre rather than typical fantasy. Is this symptomatic of the lack of a truly popular SF RPG?
 

Despite the stuff on the House of the Prophets, I don't think DS9 really tapped into the mythic (some might say pretentious) feel of Babylon 5, whereas Mass Effect and Radiant Citadel do. JMS was open about being inspired by Tolkien and Moorcock.

Just taking the space station story SF subgenre in general, it's older than B5. I've read a couple that date back to the 60s and 70s. Not so much on TV, although one might put Space 1999 and a few Doctor Who stories in there.

In terms of story structure, it looks like Radiant Citadel will be very Stargate (TV show) like. We have a home base, from which we visit a series of different planets of the week.

It's occurred to me that Radiant Citadel is visiting themes usually associated with the science fiction genre rather than typical fantasy. Is this symptomatic of the lack of a truly popular SF RPG?

The Emissary, the Costa Mojin, cosmic battles between the Pawraiths and Prophets, Changelings, etc..., like are you kidding me?
 

The Emissary, the Costa Mojin, cosmic battles between the Pawraiths and Prophets, Changelings, etc..., like are you kidding me?
No. They tried for mythic, but somehow never managed to quite hit the tone. It always felt prosaic, even when dealing with gods and demons.

It's the difference between writing "on the threshold of a mighty vortex where gods might dwell" and "parked next to a wormhole". The writing in DS9 always tended to the later, no matter what the subject matter.

To an extent being part of the Star Trek EU was a problem. The universe was already jam packed of super-advanced godlike aliens. A few more aren't particularly surprising.
 
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