Real life groom's revenge.

KenM

Banned
Banned
This is a true story about a recent wedding that took place at Clemson University. It was in the local newspaper and even Jay Leno mentioned it.

It was a huge wedding with about 300 guests. After the wedding at the reception, the groom got up on stage with microphone to talk to the crowd. He said he wanted to thank everyone for coming, many from long distances, to support them at their wedding.

He especially wanted to thank the bride's and his family and to thank
his new father-in-law for providing such a lavish reception.

As a token of his deep appreciation he said he wanted to give everyone
a special gift just from him. So taped to the bottom of everyone's
chair, including the wedding party, was a manila envelope.

He said this was his gift to everyone, and asked them to open their
envelope. Inside each manila envelope was an 8x10 glossy of his
bride having sex with the best man.

The groom had gotten suspicious of them weeks earlier and had
hired a private detective to tail them.
After just standing there, just watching the guests' reactions for couple of of minutes,
he turned to the best man and said, "F--- you!".
Then he turned to his bride and said, "F--- you!".
Then he turned to the dumbfounded crowd and said, "I'm outta here."

He had the marriage annulled first thing in the morning.
While most people would have canceled the wedding immediately after finding out about the affair,
this guy goes through with the charade, as if nothing were wrong.

His revenge... making the bride's parents pay over $32,000
for a 300 guest wedding and reception, and best of all, trashing the bride's
and best man's reputations in front of 300 friends and family members.

This guy has balls the size of church bells.

Do you think we might get a MasterCard "priceless" commercial out of this?

Elegant wedding reception for 300 family members and friends..$32,000.

Wedding photographs commemorating the occasion.....................$3,000.

Deluxe two week honeymoon accommodations on Maui..............$8,500.

The look on everyone's face when they see the 8x10 glossy of the bride humping the best man..........
PRICELESS.

There are some things money can't buy, for everything else there's
MASTERCARD.
 

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fenrat

First Post
KenM said:
This is a true story about a recent wedding that took place at Clemson University. It was in the local newspaper and even Jay Leno mentioned it.


Sorry KenM, but I have to dispute this story. This is one of those internet urban myths that has been circulating the e-mail circuit for years. I just can't believe its true when I heard this story at least two years ago.
 

diaglo

Adventurer
fenrat said:
KenM said:
This is a true story about a recent wedding that took place at Clemson University. It was in the local newspaper and even Jay Leno mentioned it.


Sorry KenM, but I have to dispute this story. This is one of those internet urban myths that has been circulating the e-mail circuit for years. I just can't believe its true when I heard this story at least two years ago.


i read this story 7 years ago.
 

John Q. Mayhem

Explorer
I heard this story about, oh, 5 years ago in church. The pastor used it as an illustration for something. Southern Baptists are very keen on illustrations.
 


Why do you have to go around debunking myths like this? *sniff* They're so fun to hear. And fun to tell your friends.

But it ought to make it into a movie some time. *grin*
 

Tewligan

First Post
Blast you, Hypersmurf! That particular urban legend sounded familiar, and I was just about to zip over to Snopes when I saw you beat me to the punch. You win this one...
 

Angcuru

First Post
An interesting little anecdote, as annoying as it may be. An even worse reaction to an already bad situation.

In Texas (and Early Colonial America) it used to be legal to kill your wife if you caught her sleeping around. <--- not an urban myth.
 

Ashwyn

First Post
Tewligan said:
Blast you, Hypersmurf! That particular urban legend sounded familiar, and I was just about to zip over to Snopes when I saw you beat me to the punch. You win this one...
And since you posted before I did, you would have beaten me had Hypersmurf not posted it first, so blast you too! :p
 


Pielorinho

Iron Fist of Pelor
Heh. Urban legend, but I had a run-in with something not too far removed from it. Or at least, I think I did.

Once, long ago, in my misspent youth, I tried the online dating thing. One woman who I exchanged a few emails with turned out to be, as a friendly ex-girlfriend called her, "The Swirling Vortex of Doom."

After we'd exchanged a few emails, I called her up. That's when I found out that:
1) She was living with her parents,
2) After having recently tried to commit suicide again,
3) Because two months ago, her fiance had left her stranded at the altar,
4) Because he'd been oversleeping,
5) In bed with the best man.

Perhaps I'm a bad person, but I ran away really fast.

I hope that after all these years, she can laugh about it.

Perhaps I'm a rotten person, but I can.

Daniel
 


Zimri

First Post
Dirigible said:
Gotta agree. There's no reason it couldn't be true.

Who said urban legends have to be false

Q: Why do you have some true stories listed as "urban legends"?

A: An "urban legend" is not the same thing as a "fictional tale" or an "apocryphal anecdote," although many people mistakenly use the term in that sense (e.g., "That's not true; it's just an urban legend!"). A tale is considered to be an urban legend if it circulates widely, is told and re-told with differing details (or exists in multiple versions), and is said to be true. Whether or not the events described in the tale ever actually occurred is completely irrelevant to its classification as an urban legend.

For example, the tale about a student who mistakes a math problem thought to be unsolvable for a homework assignment and solves it is an urban legend, even though something very similar did once happen in real life. The tale is still an urban legend, however, because over the years many of its details (i.e., when it happened, where it happened, the identity of the student, the reaction of the student's instructor) have changed as it has spread.

Q: I know an urban legend that really happened, but your site doesn't list it as true (or vice-versa). Why not?

There are several reasons why this might be so:


We rate an urban legend as "true" when there is sufficient evidence to indicate that the legend began with a real-life event. If the actions described in an urban legend play out in real life after the legend has begun circulating, that is not an example of what we consider a "true" urban legend -- it is a phenomenon known as "ostension" (and when someone deliberately enacts the events described by an urban legend, that is known as "pseudo-ostension").
Many urban legends describe events so general and plausible that they might very well have happened to somebody, somewhere, sometime. But since seldom can a legend's origins be traced to a specific, identifiable occurrence, we rarely categorize them as "true."


Many of the texts we discuss contain a mixture of truth, falsity, and exaggeration which cannot be accurately described by a single "True" or "False" rating. Therefore, our rating may be based upon what we have chosen as the single most important aspect of the text under discussion, which is summarized in the statement made after the "Claim:" heading at the top of the page. It is important to make note of the wording of that claim, since that is the statement to which our truth rating applies.

Many legends present events that may have taken place in real life only a few times (or once, or even never) as if they were frequent, everyday occurrences, and we make a distinction between "This once happened" and "This is a common, on-going occurrence." For example, many people have read warnings about the dangers posed by kidnappers who allegedly abduct children at malls or amusement parks by taking their victims into bathrooms, drugging them, cutting and dyeing their hair, changing their clothing, and smuggling them out exits disguised as the opposite sex. This legend is classified as false because we have found no credible evidence that a kidnapping has ever been pulled off using this scheme. Even if we did uncover evidence that such a kidnapping once took place, however, we would still classify the legend as false, because an essential feature of the legend is a warning that this type of kidnapping is a regular occurrence, and one real-life instance does not constitute a regular occurrence.

From the snopes.com faq
 



Djeta Thernadier

First Post
Maybe I'm weird, but I think if stuff like this actually DOES happen, it's really childish and just makes the groom look no better than the cheating bride.

And she can probably find some sort of privacy law , sue him for doing something like this, call it emotional distress and get the $32,000 back and then some.
 

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