So what are you reading this year 2021?

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading An Artificial Night by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.

Still reading Matchlock and the Embassy: A Thirty Years’ War Story by Zachary Twamley.

Finished listening to Skyward by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading The Black Ice by Michael Connelly.

Still reading Rise of the King by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Sorcerer of the North by John Flanagan.

Still reading Ghost Story by Jim Butcher.

Still reading ReDawn by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson.

Started listening to Starsight by Brandon Sanderson.

Started reading When Christmas Comes by Andrew Klavan.
 

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I do as well. They now seem like such a snapshot of the Cold War. I'll be curious to see what the TV series is like (if it makes it to production).

i love his vampire books!

I finished reading The Return of the King. The Scouring of the Shire is such an important part tonally - I get why Jackson removed it, but will disagree with that decision eternally.

I also read Lord Dunsany's The Gods of Pegana. Moving and thought-provoking. Though it's not in my top Dunsany tales, its influence on fantasy is clearly enormous.

Now I'm reading Fred Saberhagen's Third Book of Swords.
 

wicked cool

Adventurer
I do as well. They now seem like such a snapshot of the Cold War. I'll be curious to see what the TV series is like (if it makes it to production).



I finished reading The Return of the King. The Scouring of the Shire is such an important part tonally - I get why Jackson removed it, but will disagree with that decision eternally.

I also read Lord Dunsany's The Gods of Pegana. Moving and thought-provoking. Though it's not in my top Dunsany tales, its influence on fantasy is clearly enormous.

Now I'm reading Fred Saberhagen's Third Book of Swords.
there was a movie option (felt like it took years and i think the studio lost it ). Is there a tv rumored?
 

As of this summer, yes. There's a lot that was announced as possible, but as to what actually happens, that remains to be seen:


there was a movie option (felt like it took years and i think the studio lost it ). Is there a tv rumored?
 

Ryujin

Legend
I do as well. They now seem like such a snapshot of the Cold War. I'll be curious to see what the TV series is like (if it makes it to production).



I finished reading The Return of the King. The Scouring of the Shire is such an important part tonally - I get why Jackson removed it, but will disagree with that decision eternally.

I also read Lord Dunsany's The Gods of Pegana. Moving and thought-provoking. Though it's not in my top Dunsany tales, its influence on fantasy is clearly enormous.

Now I'm reading Fred Saberhagen's Third Book of Swords.
That's my one regret about the movie adaptation, as it's a "coming of age" moment for the Hobbits. I don't nitpick the colour of Galadriel's dress or the lack of Tom Bombadil and the Ents, but "The Scouring of the Shire" was such a great literary moment for me.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
I found the scouring a cynical effort to say it really doesn't matter, bad changes come no matter what you do.

I just got two new Ottolenghi cookbooks, and am reading them. I'm also reading The Wandering Fire by Guy Kay Gavriel.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Found 9 books on my to-read list (I have this wacky goal to read every Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy award winner and nominee published after 1980) at a used bookstore. Huzzah!

And yet, here I go reading a non-H/N/WF award nominee in the form of Robin Hobbs Liveship Traders trilogy. Ah well, she's delivered the goods so far with the Assassin's Apprentice series, so I'm looking forward to the ride.
 


Yeah, it reaffirms that the hobbits are the true heroes of the tale, and shows how they've grown from the beginning. It also gives Saruman a proper ending, one entirely and shockingly absent in the theatrical cut.

That's my one regret about the movie adaptation, as it's a "coming of age" moment for the Hobbits. I don't nitpick the colour of Galadriel's dress or the lack of Tom Bombadil and the Ents, but "The Scouring of the Shire" was such a great literary moment for me.

Partially, but though it takes time, the Shire also ends up more beautiful than before, thanks in no small part due to Samwise's efforts. The only Mallorn tree outside of Lothlorien grows there.

Rather than cynicism, I think it shows how war comes home, even to those that think they can stay clear of it by sticking their heads in the ground. It also shows what the hobbits can do, when they're roused and riled up.

I found the scouring a cynical effort to say it really doesn't matter, bad changes come no matter what you do.
 

Ryujin

Legend
Yeah, it reaffirms that the hobbits are the true heroes of the tale, and shows how they've grown from the beginning. It also gives Saruman a proper ending, one entirely and shockingly absent in the theatrical cut.



Partially, but though it takes time, the Shire also ends up more beautiful than before, thanks in no small part due to Samwise's efforts. The only Mallorn tree outside of Lothlorien grows there.

Rather than cynicism, I think it shows how war comes home, even to those that think they can stay clear of it by sticking their heads in the ground. It also shows what the hobbits can do, when they're roused and riled up.
I would agree. To me, "The Scouring of the Shire" is about growing up and personal empowerment to make change. The Hobbits were stand-ins for Tolkien's own children. These were stories for his children and, while he said that he didn't do allegory, the stories were certainly influenced by his children. Lessons were learnt.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
%70 of the way through the ninth and last Expanse novel, Leviathan Falls. I’m going to be sad when I’m done.
I have been wanting to get back on the Expanse train. Dropped after book... 3 maybe? Probably need to start at the beginning, I forget everything except that there's a detective and a ship captain and some sort of (maybe) supernatural thingie.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading An Artificial Night by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.

Still reading Matchlock and the Embassy: A Thirty Years’ War Story by Zachary Twamley.

Still reading The Black Ice by Michael Connelly.

Still reading Rise of the King by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Sorcerer of the North by John Flanagan.

Still reading Ghost Story by Jim Butcher.

Still reading ReDawn by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson.

Started listening to Starsight by Brandon Sanderson.

Finished reading When Christmas Comes by Andrew Klavan.
 

Mallus

Legend
I have been wanting to get back on the Expanse train. Dropped after book... 3 maybe? Probably need to start at the beginning, I forget everything except that there's a detective and a ship captain and some sort of (maybe) supernatural thingie.
The book series ends strong and books 5 - 6 are fantastic. There's some consensus around book 4 being a letdown, but I liked it. It dives pretty deeply into the 'supernatural' stuff. Mild spoiler: it's super-science, not supernatural.

The TV series is also very good. Though it's a bit darker in tone than the novels. The books often feel like summer blockbuster movies. The show is more Serious Prestige TV - still fun, though.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Slowly finding ways around my covid reading block. First Andy Weir's Project Hail Mary, and now John Scalzi's The Lost Colony, the third in his "Old Man's War" series.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
The TV series is also very good. Though it's a bit darker in tone than the novels. The books often feel like summer blockbuster movies. The show is more Serious Prestige TV - still fun, though.
The books really grew on me. My reaction to the first was "Oh look, they're doing "X" in space now", but then it actually went somewhere. There's definitely a blockbuster/popcorn action movie sort of quality, but they're also well written, very well planned out, and solid. Not a neverending series.

The Expanse on tv is amazing.
 

I finished Saberhagen's Third Book of Swords. It was a re-read of the series, though the first one was long ago. I found I liked it much better this time, all the moreso because I had finally read the Empire of the East series before attempting the re-read.

Now I'm reading Andre Norton's Web of the Witch World.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading An Artificial Night by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.

Still reading Matchlock and the Embassy: A Thirty Years’ War Story by Zachary Twamley.

Still reading The Black Ice by Michael Connelly.

Still reading Rise of the King by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Sorcerer of the North by John Flanagan.

Still reading Ghost Story by Jim Butcher.

Still reading ReDawn by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson.

Still listening to Starsight by Brandon Sanderson.

Started reading Critical Role: Vox Machina – Kith and Kin by Marieke Nijkamp.
 

AcererakTriple6

Autistic DM (he/him)
I just finished Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson. I haven't read a book by him that I haven't liked as of yet, but I definitely didn't like it as much as Mistborn or the Stormlight Archive. It was good, and I recommend it, but it wasn't super amazing or anything. Had nice and cool moments, I really liked the characters and worldbuilding, but wasn't really anything super special, IMO.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
I just finished Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson. I haven't read a book by him that I haven't liked as of yet, but I definitely didn't like it as much as Mistborn or the Stormlight Archive. It was good, and I recommend it, but it wasn't super amazing or anything. Had nice and cool moments, I really liked the characters and worldbuilding, but wasn't really anything super special, IMO.
I like its understatedness, and obviously we aren't done with a couple of the characters. The sequel is on the docket for...soonish? (in Brandon terms). Watch Brandon's website this month for State of the Sanderson to find out when.
 

Richards

Legend
I finished Hull Zero Three today and I'm glad I did so, for that was the second-least enjoyable Greg Bear novel I've read (the top title going to his Darwin's Radio, a novel I really hated and only finished because I was stuck on a plane and had no other options). I remember enjoying some of his shorter fiction but I think I'm going to have to drop him from my list of authors. This one just spent a lot of time going nowhere, with characters who didn't even have names for the first half of the novel (and thus I had a hard time really caring much about them).

So, to make up for a bad reading experience, I've opted to go with a book I'm almost certainly guaranteed to enjoy much better: Bully Pulpit, #151 in the Destroyer series. I'm not often steered wrong by the adventures of Remo Williams and Chiun, the Master of Sinanju. It'll be nice to catch up with them for a bit.

Johnathan
 

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