D&D 5E Tales From the Yawning Portal Needs a Sequel

Reynard

Legend
The author of the Grippli adventure from Candlekeep was so upset by the editing, which left a whole bunch out and changed the tone significantly from what he had submitted (and thought had been accepted), that he disavowed it completely.

Radiant Citadel seems to have come through that process in very good shape.
Never do work for hire if you care about its final form. I once talked to a Hollywood screen writer who said the only industry that rewrote you more than Hollywood was RPGs. I haven't written for Hollywood but my experience in RPGs backs this up -- especially the bigger the company.
 

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Reynard

Legend
To be fair, if the editing was good, the bad writing would never make it out the door.
I have seen editors completely rewrite work they already paid for. Deadlines create requirements. To be clear: "bad writing" isn't the same thing as "bad ideas" and sometimes when you are making three cents a word you don't have the time or wherewithal to polish the way maybe you should.
 

J.Quondam

CR 1/8
I have seen editors completely rewrite work they already paid for. Deadlines create requirements. To be clear: "bad writing" isn't the same thing as "bad ideas" and sometimes when you are making three cents a word you don't have the time or wherewithal to polish the way maybe you should.
Yep. It's almost as if the entire writing industry/s could benefit from a complete overhaul in favor of the army of people actually doing the work. And throw in all other creative businesses, while we're at it.
 

Reynard

Legend
Yep. It's almost as if the entire writing industry/s could benefit from a complete overhaul in favor of the army of people actually doing the work. And throw in all other creative businesses, while we're at it.
I don't know about the "entire writing industry" but the TTRPG industry as a whole relies entirely too much on rushed, underpaid freelancers.
 

James Gasik

Legend
Supporter
I am kind of doen with 5E but a solid conversion of Red Hand of Doom would bring me back post haste. It is long enough that it could be the anchor of a new anthology but still leave room for some other adventures or setting info and players options. RHoD is hands down the best adventure of the WotC era.
Or even Scales of War.
 

Stormonu

Legend
I would like published adventures from more recently than 1e and 2e. In other words 3e and 4e adventures. I'd REALLY like the first 3 4e adventures updated and lots of the story elements fixed - in particular the Pyramid of Shadows.

OR - the entire Scales of War mega campaign re-jiggered for 5e with level progression from 1-20 instead of 1-30...

That would probably require an entire re-write because it is very Nentir Vale focused, so would have to re-write for Faerun
Why would it need to be rewritten for Faerun? Ghosts of Saltmarsh wasn't. Nothing wrong with giving us another prior campaign world with Nentir Vale.
 


WG4 - Forgotten Temple of Tharizdun
I do think at least some of these have a rose-tinted nostalgia goggles effect going on. I reread this one a couple of weeks ago, and it's really pretty bad. Just a fairly random collection of rooms stocked with a fairly random assortment of dull monsters. The most interesting thing about it is the quirky (by modern standards) writing style, which reveals more about the author's intent than you see these days, making the "killer DM" playstyle apparent.
 

TwiceBorn2

Adventurer
I do think at least some of these have a rose-tinted nostalgia goggles effect going on. I reread this one a couple of weeks ago, and it's really pretty bad. Just a fairly random collection of rooms stocked with a fairly random assortment of dull monsters. The most interesting thing about it is the quirky (by modern standards) writing style, which reveals more about the author's intent than you see these days, making the "killer DM" playstyle apparent.
I agree 100%. Out of those I listed (all of which I own in their original versions), the only one I have actually run is Against the Cult of the Reptile God, which I enjoyed quite a bit back in the day. The questionable writing and design of most of those adventures is why I specified previously that I would want the scenarios revised in a manner that goes well beyond updating stat blocks -- I would want full-on improvements to the adventures themselves. Now you may well ask me what the point of that is, why not just move on to something fresh and new, and I may not have a satisfactory answer other than: I still want to blend classic Greyhawk adventures into my campaign, adventures that I've owned for decades but never got to play/run. Sure, I could update them myself... but I'd prefer someone spare me most of the effort.
 

The questionable writing and design of most of those adventures is why I specified previously that I would want the scenarios revised in a manner that goes well beyond updating stat blocks
I think the writing of those original adventures is the most interesting thing. Updated, they are just not very good adventures. In the end I wrote an adventure that riffs on WG4, but didn't find anything worth preserving apart from the statue descriptions.
 

Not that I am aware of. Just authors saying "Woof...yeah."
I view that as the author's issue. They had a word count target and failed to deliver a cohesive product in that wordcount. Since we do not have the actual submisison, all we have is a complant that it was much better than what appeared. I doubt it.

I increasingly feel that WoTC books are out of control with the size of their writing crews. For anthology style books it just means they are very unven. For larger adventures, it seems to mean story points appear and disappear depending on what chapter and writer(s) was working on it.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I do think at least some of these have a rose-tinted nostalgia goggles effect going on. I reread this one a couple of weeks ago, and it's really pretty bad. Just a fairly random collection of rooms stocked with a fairly random assortment of dull monsters. The most interesting thing about it is the quirky (by modern standards) writing style, which reveals more about the author's intent than you see these days, making the "killer DM" playstyle apparent.
Yeah, I've got a plan to run one of my groups via 5e through this. I think I need to re-read and do some editing...
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Why would it need to be rewritten for Faerun? Ghosts of Saltmarsh wasn't. Nothing wrong with giving us another prior campaign world with Nentir Vale.
Yes! Good point. So one more impediment to re-doing Scales of War removed :)

Scales of War was a bit uneven, and needs some connective tissue re-worked, since it was written by multiple authors with short deadlines and no doubt harried editors who were working on other projects also due for a given issue of Dungeon Magazine. But all solvable problems...
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I would love another run through of Keep on the Shadowfell. It was fun at the time, my group just couldn't get into 4e. I have the follow up to that adventure we ended up abandoning the game before I had a chance to run it. It's still in the shrink wrap.
We did Shadowfell, and then a pretty heavily modified Thunderspire. And finally, our GM gave us the option of going through the Pyramid - but with the caveat that he thought it was broken and he wasn't going to fix it... Or we could go south to the city of Westcrown in the country of Cheliax thereby completely taking us out of the canon Nentir Vale. We of course decided to head south, and finished off completing the Council of Thieves pathfinder adventure path (I think from book 3 onward)
 

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