D&D 5E The Bible Is A New 5E Setting

The Adventurer’s Guide to the Bible is a 5E setting and adventure set in the first century AD.

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The 350-page book, created by Bible enthusiasts, included four new lineages, a range of subclasses, and an adventure for character levels 1-10, along with a full first-century AD setting with locations like the Library of Alexandria and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, NPCs, and monsters such as giants, seraph serpents, angels, and demons. The adventure itself involves a search for three missing Magi.

It's $25 for a PDF, or $39 for a hardcover.


Cleopatra is dead. Rome and Parthia struggle for control of the Fertile Crescent in a bid for world domination, while local politics in the Middle Kingdoms become increasingly divisive. The prophecies of the so-called “Messiah” have long been forgotten, and an ancient Evil lurks in the shadows, corrupting the hearts of humankind. Three of the wisest mystics known as the “Magi” travelled to Bethlehem following a star they believed to be a sign. They never returned. Hope grows dim as the world descends into darkness. What we need are answers... and those brave enough to seek them.


This isn’t the first biblical era setting for D&D, although it might be for 5E. Green Ronin released Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era for 3E over a decade ago.

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
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If I am not mistaken the Nephilim ARE giants. They were the by product of angels and man (humans in the bible). So, the fact that Nephilim are separate, I am a bit confused
Also, my guess for the 4th lineage is probably angels or devils

Yeah, sometimes Nephilim are translated giants but generally they were fallen ‘supermen’, being giant sized was a byproduct of their superior nature, not a defining trait.

Goliath and his brothers however were Anakim not Nephilim so making a distinction is canonical (if anything Nephilim are Aasimar)
 
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Gotta say, when I first saw this thread, I was...not expecting good things. I'm a Christian myself and try to be relatively serious about my faith, but I know how easy it is for "Christian entertainment" stuff to rapidly go off the deep end. (The attempts at overtly Christian video games over the years are, heh, testament to that.) Such endeavors often either become little better than Chick Tracts, or are so watered-down and genericized that they feel more like "this'll SURELY lock in all those Bible-thumpers and their sweet, sweet cash!"

But, having read the Kickstarter campaign stuff now, it sounds reasonably okay. Faithful to the material without insisting upon the material, if that makes sense. I dunno if it would be something I personally want or use, especially since I don't really play 5e, but it's surprisingly level-headed and open-ended for a "Christian game" product. I wish them luck, and not in the semi-sarcastic "this will never work" sense but in the "hey, sounds like you have a cool thing" sense.
 

If this starts to become unconfortable then this can replaced by a fantasy setting. Chronicles of Narnia is Christian fantasy, and Aslan is an allegory of Jesuchrist. Tolkien's middle earth was also Christian fantasy, and even Dragonlance it is in its own way.

If you ask about the origin of biblical giants, and I guess I can say it here, according "Mysteries of the Old Testament" by Anne Catherine Emmerich, the first giants were.... Adam and Eve. Yes, humanity parents and first generations were giants. Later humans became shorter.

And about to create monotheist spellcasters, the miracles can't work like the standar divine D&D magic, because according "Maria Valtorta's Visions about Life of Jesuchrist" if you want God's help, then you have to offer the same: love and obedience. I imagine Christian spellcasters in a D&D petlum/ancient Rome campain as masters of counterspelling, creating penalties against unholy creatures, and breaking enemy's magic buff.

* I know nothing about the publishers, and I worry about this, it sounds like a bad sign. I don't want a new scandal like the failed crownfunding of Gamezone's Hero Quest 25 Anniversary.

* WotC could create a new planed based in a fantasy version of petlum/sword & sandal for Magic: the Gathering.

* This title is important to show there is an important section of the market willing to buy products where they feel wellcome, but today they are practically totally forgotten by the main media.

* Rembember Jew PCs can eat rabbit neither sellfish but locust is allowed by Moses' law.
 


If this starts to become unconfortable then this can replaced by a fantasy setting. Chronicles of Narnia is Christian fantasy, and Aslan is an allegory of Jesuchrist. Tolkien's middle earth was also Christian fantasy, and even Dragonlance it is in its own way.
Formally speaking, Aslan is not an allegory, a point Lewis stressed very hard while he was alive. Probably worth noting, since he was a professor of literature at both Oxford and Cambridge, and very specifically was an expert on the use of allegory in Medieval and Renaissance literature. Allegory requires a physical entity that represents an abstract concept in the story. Aslan doesn't represent anything; in-story, he literally is Jesus, just as he appears in a parallel universe. It's speculative Christian fiction, not allegory.
 

Formally speaking, Aslan is not an allegory, a point Lewis stressed very hard while he was alive. Probably worth noting, since he was a professor of literature at both Oxford and Cambridge, and very specifically was an expert on the use of allegory in Medieval and Renaissance literature. Allegory requires a physical entity that represents an abstract concept in the story. Aslan doesn't represent anything; in-story, he literally is Jesus, just as he appears in a parallel universe. It's speculative Christian fiction, not allegory.
I was worried that I would have to say it.
 

GreyLord

Legend
The most rocking, Christian, game I ever played on the Computer was Diablo 2. This is followed by Diablo and Diablo 3.

Many may disagree

But these three took a lot of inspiration from Christianity and Christian mythos and made a rocking game for me

In the last one (#3) they even had Nephilim! Now can you see?

When you really look at it, It really is a game based on Christianity
 

Zarithar

Adventurer
The most rocking, Christian, game I ever played on the Computer was Diablo 2. This is followed by Diablo and Diablo 3.

Many may disagree

But these three took a lot of inspiration from Christianity and Christian mythos and made a rocking game for me

In the last one (#3) they even had Nephilim! Now can you see?

When you really look at it, It really is a game based on Christianity
I completely agree - although Blizzard veered away from it more and more as the series progressed.
 

vincegetorix

Jewel of the North
The most rocking, Christian, game I ever played on the Computer was Diablo 2. This is followed by Diablo and Diablo 3.

Many may disagree

But these three took a lot of inspiration from Christianity and Christian mythos and made a rocking game for me

In the last one (#3) they even had Nephilim! Now can you see?

When you really look at it, It really is a game based on Christianity
This is exactly my take on this as well: I would have gone with a fantasy setting based on the Bible rather than playing a real-setting. I just fear there wont be much to do for adventurers in such a setting.

A mix of Diablo (mainly 1 and 2) and Dragon Age (in the times of the Tevinter Imperium and Andraste) based in a bronze age-ish setting would be a superb setting.
 

damiller

Explorer
I am looking forward to this, I have had so many campaign ideas around this period of time. Its my favorite period in history, and it is interesting to me that the whole world seemed ingulfed in chaos - political, religiously, maybe even economically.

In fact I have had two copies Testament from Green Ronin. I pestered them so muchthey sent me (if the sticky note is to be believed) the first one out of the box. I read that thing religiously. But the Bronze age isn't' my jam.

They also produced a Roman Era supplement. But it didn't talk much about Judea, or the Middle East. And in either case I didn't really like 3e. For a long time I was hoping someone would update either or both of those to 5e.

This will do.

But I think I may have trouble finding players because these are my ideas:

  1. PCs are from a Gnostic Christian sect going around trying to prove they are the real Christians, or "fight" for their version thereof. (involving a lot of theological debates about minor points)*
  2. Sicarii dagger men targeting political opponents.
  3. Gladiators in the Arenas who work their way up through the ranks, and encounter Christians
  4. The Players are Roman Investigators (call of cthulhu) who track down a scattered group of cultists that are killing human males and eating them to give themselves occult power, only to find out they just slaughtered a bunch of relatively harmless Christians.
  5. PCs are "canonical" Christian disciples.
I appreciate how the writers have answered questions, specifically on the reddit question about pharisees. In a historical game avoiding stereo types is important and I think their answer was great.

Anyway backed and looking forward to it.

*This one intrigues me because of my background as a 'seventh day adventist' (actually I was in the dollar store version of that group, but its not important). They were born out of a huge disappointment about the return of Christ, and at the time, who was right about what was a big issue for those believers, and the cause for a lot of theological debates. Out of it we got Seventh Day Adventism, First Day Adventism, Seventh Day Baptists, and perhaps Jehovah Witnesses. The first century for christianity was very similiar, lots of debates about how and what christianity was and is.
 
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Pargates

Villager
In my area in the 1980s there were quite a few campaigns with varying levels of Christian influence. Mostly this meant that the campaign was pretty much standard D&D with no evil PCs and a general agreement that Christian ethics = Lawful Good. I did play in one that featured the Abrahamic God as a member of the pantheon named "LORDUS". In the context of the time it was expected that you might have to fight deities so He had a statbox with the special note that as long as one faithful follower remained alive, LORDUS could not lose His last hit point.
 

It's amusing. I am curious to see if this is the creation of enthusiasts or of experts. If it's enthusiasts, don't expect either historical or biblical accuracy. If it's experts, I am expecting an attempt to coax a square peg through the eye of a needle. As I am a setting cannibal for the most part, I am most interested in crunch like monsters and magic items.

It is nice to have won the Satanic Panic.

Hard to say how the larger community should embrace this product and it's creators. Game as educational/indoctrination tool. Have to keep an eye on it.
 

Ulfgeir

Hero
Not my cup of tea. I have a friend who might like it as he is a pastor (and a gamer).

And they seem to be a bit fluid with the time there. Which leads to a few weird thoughts for me... Since they set it in a time before a certain person allegedly started preaching, does that mean that the god there is still the old-testament petty and vengeful god (that for example had no problem letting a bear appear to kill and maul children that mocked a prophet), or when did that being change behaviour? And well, the Romans worshipped a pantheon, so how will they handle that?

And will you be able to interact with the rather monstrous angels (per the description by one of the prophets) that would fit well in with H.P. Lovecrafts stuff? I mean a being with four faces, or a burning wheel of fire with hundreds of eyes..
 

J-H

Hero
The most rocking, Christian, game I ever played on the Computer was Diablo 2. This is followed by Diablo and Diablo 3.

Many may disagree

But these three took a lot of inspiration from Christianity and Christian mythos and made a rocking game for me

In the last one (#3) they even had Nephilim! Now can you see?

When you really look at it, It really is a game based on Christianity
Eh, they may be inspired by some of the side characters (angels/demons), but any game that has "Humanity can win on their own by might or power" is pretty explicitly tossing the message of the Bible out the window.
 

Oofta

Legend
It seems like kind of an oddly specific timeframe for the setting. If it's for Christians, then Jesus isn't really a thing yet and it would have made more sense to do something starting around 100 AD instead. If it's old school old testament, I would have set it far earlier.

But maybe it's just my style, years or even decades pass over the course of a single campaign. I'm not particularly interested in the setting (I'd rather pick up the Theros book) but it feels limiting for grander stories. There would be a lot to mine from the persecution of Christians era to the beginnings of the modern church.
 


Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
It seems like kind of an oddly specific timeframe for the setting. If it's for Christians, then Jesus isn't really a thing yet and it would have made more sense to do something starting around 100 AD instead. If it's old school old testament, I would have set it far earlier.

But maybe it's just my style, years or even decades pass over the course of a single campaign. I'm not particularly interested in the setting (I'd rather pick up the Theros book) but it feels limiting for grander stories. There would be a lot to mine from the persecution of Christians era to the beginnings of the modern church.

yeah I would have gone with Hellenistic period myself - you’ve got the Ptolemys and Seleucids on either side of Judea, Hellenized Jews trying to reform Religious Law, the High Priest being assasinated, statues of Zeus being installed in Jerusalem and the Maccabean Revolt and subsequent civil war, fun times …
 

Galandris

Foggy Bottom Campaign Setting Fan
There would be a lot to mine from the persecution of Christians era to the beginnings of the modern church.

I think the setting would have risked being more contentious this way (meeting Jesus and the apostles [if they are statted, they can be killed... not something you'd want in all groups], depicting religious intolerance (not something accepted in RPGs these days)... I think targetting the era just before Christianity became a thing is safe from the point of view of the editor, each group can then play their Judean Adventures with the appropriate treatment of the religious aspect to their taste.

I question the choice of 5e. Mythic Judea with Mythras would have sounded more appropriate to the genre.
 

So with this, we can pretty much do our Bibleman and Veggie Tales 5E games, or even crossovers between the two.

If your a Nephilim, does that mean your trying to score brownie points with the big guy upstairs to avoid getting flooded out with the rest of em?

Jesus OP because he Auto-Rezzes every three days.

And the most important: I can FINALLY play as my Jew character from South Park: The Stick of Truth now.

Admit it: you'd pay money to see Jesus Shoryuken a Drider.
 

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