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5E The New D&D Book: Tasha's Cauldron of Everything!

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The new D&D book has been revealed, and it is Tasha's Cauldron of Everything, "a magical mixture of rules options for the world's greatest roleplaying game." The 192-page book is due out November 17th, with standard and alternate covers, and contains more subclasses, spells, character options, group patrons, and rules. Oh, and psionics!


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Cover art is by Magali Villeneuve

WHAT WONDERFUL WITCHERY IS THIS?

A magical mixture of rules options for the world's greatest roleplaying game.

The wizard Tasha, whose great works include the spell Tasha’s hideous laughter, has gathered bits and bobs of precious lore during her illustrious career as an adventurer. Her enemies wouldn’t want these treasured secrets scattered across the multiverse, so in defiance, she has collected and codified these tidbits for the enrichment of all.
  • EXPANDED SUBCLASSES. Try out subclass options for every Dungeons & Dragons class, including the artificer, which appears in the book.
  • MORE CHARACTER OPTIONS. Delve into a collection of new class features and new feats, and customize your character’s origin using straightforward rules for modifying a character’s racial traits.
  • INTRODUCING GROUP PATRONS. Whether you're part of the same criminal syndicate or working for an ancient dragon, each group patron option comes with its own perks and types of assignments.
  • SPELLS, ARTIFACTS & MAGIC TATTOOS. Discover more spells, as well as magic tattoos, artifacts, and other magic items for your campaign.
  • EXPANDED RULES OPTIONS. Try out rules for sidekicks, supernatural environments, natural hazards, and parleying with monsters, and gain guidance on running a session zero.
  • A PLETHORA OF PUZZLES. Ready to be dropped into any D&D adventure, puzzles of varied difficulty await your adventurers, complete with traps and guidance on using the puzzles in a campaign.
Full of expanded content for players and Dungeon Masters alike, this book is a great addition to the Player's Handbook and the Dungeon Master’s Guide. Baked in you'll find more rule options for all the character classes in the Player's Handbook, including more subclass options. Thrown in for good measure is the artificer class, a master of magical invention. And this witch's brew wouldn't be complete without a dash of added artifacts, spellbook options, spells for both player characters and monsters, magical tattoos, group patrons, and other tasty goodies.

Here's the alternate cover:

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UPDATE! An online event called D&D Celebration from September 18th-20th will be hosted by Elle Osili-Wood, which is "an epic live event with panels, gameplay, & previews of the book!" See the video in the Tweet below!

Gather your party and join the adventure at  D&D Celebration 2020, an online gaming event open to fans all over the world!

Celebrate the release of  Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden  with a weekend of Icewind Dale–themed virtual play sessions and help us create the biggest virtual tabletop roleplaying game event ever! Fans will also get the chance to preview some content from  Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, the forthcoming book featuring massive rules options, subclasses, and more for the fifth edition of Dungeons & Dragons. Watch featured play sessions with D&D luminaries and learn something new with a slate of panels led by the D&D design team and community.


UPDATE! Check out the Nerdarchy site for some previews.


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UPDATE! Other news items around the web about this book:




 
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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
the problem begins when you start thinking your interpretation is the Correct™ one.
My interpretation is correct for me. IV, V, II, III, VI, VII, VIII is a beautiful story about one man’s involvement in the ongoing struggle against fascism, who inspires the next generation to learn from his mistakes as he learned from the previous generation’s mistakes. For me, that’s a deeply powerful and inspiring story. For others it might not be. Art is subjective and everyone takes their own messages from it, and that’s a good thing.
 


Cadence

Legend
Supporter
My interpretation is correct for me.

I did IV, V, VI for what I shared with my now 11yo. Might go with Rogue One at some point. III and VII feel odd for sharing with pre-teen to me :-/ I might change my views in a few years when (if) he decides he wants to see them all. That being said, he has seen the Lego versions of the prequels, so there might not be that many surprises. (I confess to not seeing IX or the Clonewars).
 





Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
Y'all why did you resurrect the Star Wars talk when this is the Tasha's thread?
Man, someone just quoted me out of the blue to say how the way I prefer to enjoy the series “only exists to poop on the prequels,” which I object to because the prequels are an essential part of the narrative as I read it. I’m just responding to what’s being said to me.
 





Marandahir

Crown-Forester
I still believe that the correct order, at least for me is:

  • Star Wars (4K77 or Harmy's DSE), The Empire Strikes Back (HDSE), Return of the Jedi (HDSE)
  • Episode I, Episode II, The Clone Wars 216, TCW 116, The Clone Wars (feature film)
  • TCW 301, TCW 303, TCW 101-115, TCW 117-121, TCW 201-203, TCW 217-219, TCW 204-214, TCW 220-222
  • TCW 305-307, TCW 302, TCW 304, TCW 308, TCW 122, TCW 309-311, TCW 215, TCW 312-322
  • TCW 401-422, TCW 502-513, TCW 501, TCW 514-520, TCW 601-613, TCW Unfinished Episodes 614-617
  • TCW 705-708, TCW 701-704, TCW 709, Episode III, The Clone Wars 710-712
  • Solo, Rebels S1-4, Rogue One-Episode IV (SE D+ cut) Double Feature
  • Episode V (SE D+ cut), Episode VI (SE D+ cut)
  • The Mandalorian S1 (and S2 in just 2 months! wha!)
  • Resistance 101-119, Episode VII, Resistance 120-121, Episode VIII, Resistance 201-219, Episode IX

This allows for the original movie experience with all its flaws and special reveals and seeing the films as close to how they were when they launched on screen, and then follows as close to canonical timeline order as possible. This seems to be the implied intended story-form of the television shows even - Rebels 413 has a time skip to post-Battle of Endor in its epilogue, so you either have to pause the show at a very unsatisfying time or get spoiled on Episode VI's ending - unless you've watched the original trilogy first. Technically you could intercut TCW 710-712 and Episode III, but it's too many pauses for my taste. Seeing Ahsoka and Rex and Maul interweve with the events of Episode III is better off as a dessert course after the meal that was Episode III.

This also starts the saga with the original mystery and natural narrative arc of R2-D2 and C-3PO dropped from space into a desert, where we don't even know if it's inhabited by humans or other friendly lifeforms until Luke and family appear on screen. This section is suspenseful if you don't have any Star Wars knowledge; it's a bit slow if you do.

Finally, the other important thing above is that Rogue One and Episode IV Special Edition cut are watched as a double feature. While I initially thought it would be high stakes to start the series with Rogue One, there's just too much to follow if you don't know anything about Star Wars. Rogue One is better as the first half of the story you didn't know about upon second viewing of the original film. I do have to say though, if you do skip bullet point one, then Rogue One-A New Hope double feature works just fine, and it makes the stakes of the Death Star all the more weighty.

I think The Clone Wars and Rebels are necessary viewing before Rogue One to understand the motivations of characters like Mon Mothma and Saw Gerrera, who lack aplomb without further knowledge of who they are.
 
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My interpretation is correct for me. IV, V, II, III, VI, VII, VIII is a beautiful story about one man’s involvement in the ongoing struggle against fascism, who inspires the next generation to learn from his mistakes as he learned from the previous generation’s mistakes. For me, that’s a deeply powerful and inspiring story. For others it might not be. Art is subjective and everyone takes their own messages from it, and that’s a good thing.
I have never binge-watched Star Wars. If (when) I do, I will keep this order in mind, and see how it plays out.
 

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