5E The pursuit of fun

Asisreo

Explorer
I feel that the endless pursuit of "fun" can often end up causing reckless decisions that quickly reduce said fun. Other times, it causes something that increases the fun to be overlooked as one can't imagine how it would be fun before they even try it.

For instance, someone might think homebrewing the warlock to have the same spellslots as a wizard increases a player's enjoyment but because they didn't think about the balance issues with that, the warlock is overpowered and the challenge is gone. There's no more fun to be had since the warlock is too powerful to challenge without a cheesy counter or a monster that'll clobber the other members. Plus they'll feel useless.
 
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lowkey13

Guest
I had a friend that loved ice cream. He really, really loved ice cream.

Anyway, my friend worked at Ben & Jerry's one summer. And he got to eat so much ice cream. So much really, really good ice cream. All the time. The best ice cream.

He doesn't like ice cream so much any more.

Anyway, I had a point, but I can't remember what it is. Oh yeah, I really want some New York Super Fudge Chunk, but I'm terrified of going to the supermarket. Nope, that wasn't the point.

Oh well, it will come to me.
 

practicalm

Explorer
It's possible that previous editions of D&D and other RPGs have linked fun to power and defeating enemies. It happened in any edition with over powered GM favorite characters (either run by them or their best friends), It happens when players min-max in any system (HERO system point calculations were intense).

People find the above fun. Not everyone will agree. Some of us have fun in defeat or scrapping by with marginal heroes and enjoying those stories.

Neither is right or wrong. People find their fun and if you are not enjoying your group go find a group that shares your fun.

Fun is a complex and individual thing
A Theory of Fun for Game Design is one attempt to pin fun down and analyze it.
 

Asisreo

Explorer
It's possible that previous editions of D&D and other RPGs have linked fun to power and defeating enemies. It happened in any edition with over powered GM favorite characters (either run by them or their best friends), It happens when players min-max in any system (HERO system point calculations were intense).

People find the above fun. Not everyone will agree. Some of us have fun in defeat or scrapping by with marginal heroes and enjoying those stories.

Neither is right or wrong. People find their fun and if you are not enjoying your group go find a group that shares your fun.

Fun is a complex and individual thing
A Theory of Fun for Game Design is one attempt to pin fun down and analyze it.
While I'm more than aware fun can be had in different ways, that's tangential to my actual point. I'm not interested in policing other's fun but I want to remind others that fun isn't something you can just eyeball beforehand. Knowing your players go beyond being friends with them since I've had friends of 10 years and I'm still learning that their fun isn't a formula I can just apply at all times.

I don't want this to be another discussion where it's the generic "Know your players, maximize fun." We all know to try to maximize fun. I want to discuss where the pursuit of fun might cause a lack of it
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
I try to get a general feel during a session 0, but it's not always possible to please everyone.

Some people only enjoy the game when they are dominating every combat and never get scratched.

Others may not be happy unless they're on their 3rd PC by session 10.

Personally? I like to be challenged, but I don't want a meat grinder.

There is no one true way. I can't imagine playing video games on easy and never have (well outside of the occasional boss fight that just goes on forever). But that's how some people play every game.

The difficulty is balancing so no one player or PC always hogs the spotlight. Mix up challenges and encounters. If there's a guy who always hides in the back, have the monsters flank the party now and then. Occasionally have the orcs show up in fireball formation so the wizard can show off.

Remember that not everyone plays for the same reason as you and pay attention. That's about all you can do.
 

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