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The road yet taken; old timers: what is your White Whale setting?


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Sabathius42

Bree-Yark
1. I've always wanted to set a D&D game in the world of Steven Brust's Jhereg series where the houses substitute for the race choice.

2. I've always wanted to run a D&D clan setting with 12 different clans and a corresponding iconic monster based on the 4 elements crossed with Good, Neutral, and Evil such that all the fire clans may work together as much as all the good clans.

3. At this point, realistically, I just want my Torg stuff to arrive in large enough quantity that I can start my campaign.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
2. I've always wanted to run a D&D clan setting with 12 different clans and a corresponding iconic monster based on the 4 elements crossed with Good, Neutral, and Evil such that all the fire clans may work together as much as all the good clans.
What's one example of this? Like, one clan is the Dragon Clan? Oh, I got it -
You've got the Good Fire (Coatl), Neutral Fire (??), Evil Fire (Red Dragon) etc?
 

Sabathius42

Bree-Yark
What's one example of this? Like, one clan is the Dragon Clan? Oh, I got it -
You've got the Good Fire (Coatl), Neutral Fire (??), Evil Fire (Red Dragon) etc?
You pretty much nailed it.

I know Good/Fire was Phoenix and either Neutral or Evil Fire was Salamander, but I don't remember the last one. I know it wasn't the dragon because they were their own thing. Although in the world all "fire"creatures have a certain kinship to each other so even if a Red Dragon wasn't the iconic clan monster they still might find themselves working for any of the Fire clans in some capacity.

Basically I wanted to explore a world where Good/Neutral/Evil have more innate reason to "work together" to achieve some goals since I find the same-old-same-old evil creatures being used over and over a little bit tiring over 30 years of gaming.
 

Mercurius

Legend
What makes it your favorite game - or more accurately (I hope) what makes it your favorite setting? I'm always down to get inspired by awesome settings.
Short answer: A rich density of imagination.

Longer answer: Talislanta is a truly "exotic" fantasy world with few, if any, real world analogues. There are dozens of races and cultures, each of which is distinct. The main timeline (all five editions, but not Savage Land) is set about a thousand or more years after an apocalypse. The main setting is the Talislanta continent, but there's other continents lightly described in the Worldbook. It is more Jack Vance and Clark Ashton Smith than the Tolkien/Howard of early D&D. It harkens back a bit to the science fantasy of the 70s, with a bit of a "disco" vibe. I see it in a similar tradition as other "non-traditional" fantasy settings like Tekumel and Jorune. If nothing else, it is a wonderful world to explore through reading...lots of great ideas.

Plus, everything but the most recent book (Talislanta: the Savage Land) is available for free in PDF form on Talislanta.com. The Savage Land is a new book that covers the time right after the cataclysm, and is very sword & sorcery-ish. There's also a 5E version, but I recommend the Tal rules to get the full feeling of the game.

If you're curious, probably the best place to start is the explanded version of the Chronicles of Talislanta (link opens the PDF), and also the Talislanta Worldbook, which touches upon the other continents. If you're interested in the game itself, the big 4th edition book is probably the most popular treatment.

For a deeper dive, Hotan's History of the World covers the history and continent of Talislanta in depth, and the Archaen Codex or Codex Magicus have a lot of great lore. I'd also recommend checking out one of the bestiaries.
 

Tun Kai Poh

Adventurer
I want to do a grand imperial space opera like Dune or Fading Suns, but using troupe play. Players portray the leaders, strategists and spymasters of a powerful Noble House and scheme against their House's enemies. Then in the next session they play a team of agents who infiltrate and sabotage on behalf of the House's leaders. Then depending on how that mission goes, the House Leaders find out the results and work with the political consequences. Rinse and repeat.

I suspect Band of Blades could be hacked to make this work, if I ever free up the time to run this.
 

ccs

40th lv DM
Gamma World.
I've never really gotten to run, or play, in a decent GW game.

Running GW;
Pretty much no one that I've ever played these games with was much into that flavor of Sci-Fi stuff. So that pretty much rules out me running a GW game. Maybe one of these days via some VTT & an on-line group. But that's not quite the same as getting together with friends around a real table.

Playing GW;
I've been in several very short lived GW games over the decades as a player. None of them has ever captured any of the flavor found in any of the books. Or things that inspired this game. Most have quickly devolved into seeing how much damage could be inflicted with this or that weird weapon/mutation. And after a few sessions, rather than trying to improve the sessions, the group drops it.
 

pming

Adventurer
Hiya!

I've always wanted to run a Battletech/Mechwarrior campaign. The players would be a merc outfit and they would take jobs around the inner sphere.

It's tough because I don't know a ton of folks interested in the setting, and many feel its too wargamey.
ON THE NOSEY! :)

I actually have a 'system' that uses BT for the mech battles, and then the Masterbook System (find it at PiGames; Catalog ) for the PC's Role-Playing Character stuff. Turns out, the 2d6 %'ages of rolling equate almost seamlessly with the Difficulty Numbers (DN's) of the Masterbook System (I only had to add a DN of "Tricky / 11" to equate to BT's Roll Needed of 9; about 27.7%). So, basically, when you are in your mech and rolling a "mech skill" (Piloting or Attack), you just find the Roll Needed, as per BT, look at the DN of Masterbook and roll your appropriate skill. Easy peasy.

But...never got a chance to play it past the second session, just as they PC's were on a Dropship and the ship was violently shook by...something...then the ships warning claxon's started wailing! Man. Talk about a cliff-hanger! LOL!

Aside from a Battletech/RPG campaign...I've always wanted to run an Earthdawn campaign. Great setting, interesting system (1st edition is the one I'd run), with some cool possibilities. :(

^_^

Paul L. Ming
 

Tonguez

Legend
Note, there are RPGs for both Discworld and Laundryverse (well, actually, I think the Laundryverse is stalled out...)


I’ve tried the GURPS Discworld, its great to read, but the game itself came out not very funny. It takes great wit and a certain skill set to capture the humour of Discworld and well, my Bogeyman who lived in a barrel of custard in storeroom of the Clown guild got a bit sticky
 

John Dallman

Explorer
I’ve tried the GURPS Discworld, its great to read, but the game itself came out not very funny. It takes great wit and a certain skill set to capture the humour of Discworld and well, my Bogeyman who lived in a barrel of custard in storeroom of the Clown guild got a bit sticky
The trick is to create a serious problem to be solved, in a somewhat ludicrous situation. Overt sillyness gets you to the unfunny humour of the Fools Guild.
 

Eltab

Hero
Gamma World.
I've never really gotten to run, or play, in a decent GW game.

Running GW;
Pretty much no one that I've ever played these games with was much into that flavor of Sci-Fi stuff. So that pretty much rules out me running a GW game. Maybe one of these days via some VTT & an on-line group. But that's not quite the same as getting together with friends around a real table.

Playing GW;
I've been in several very short lived GW games over the decades as a player. None of them has ever captured any of the flavor found in any of the books. Or things that inspired this game. Most have quickly devolved into seeing how much damage could be inflicted with this or that weird weapon/mutation. And after a few sessions, rather than trying to improve the sessions, the group drops it.
I DM'ed Gamma World one-shots at conventions during the 1990s. I found myself occasionally telling a story while the players figured out what their pre-gen characters' Mutations could do. I think they enjoyed themselves.

Favorite (and recurring) PC: mutated cactus, always became the melee Brawler in fight scenes.

Surprise the DM scene: for the D&D 3e -analogue rules, I let the players pick one feat before play began. The plot led them on a chase into an ambush. One PC had taken Cleave, and finished in two turns a fight I had expected to take five. I usually reward clever players: they chased down the Villain. And captured his houseboat out from underneath him!
 

Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
My start as a DM was with Dragonlance, and I could never quite make it work to my satulisfaction. The Weis & Hickman novels and metaplot are so ingrained in that setting (at least in my mind) that any campaign seems either blasphemous or insignificant next to them. Taladas has some real potential extricated form that mess, but I didn't discover it until much later and couldn't find any interested players.

I would love a game set in Glen Cook's Garret Files setting. Realistically it would be extremely challenging to design, especially since the books have one central character rather than a party, and it's obvious why Cook's Black Company gets far more love in that regard.

But the Garrett books have been a major influence on almost every campaign I've run since 2000 or so, and it would be great to see good, full-on treatment of their ideas and concepts.
 

Tun Kai Poh

Adventurer
I would love a game set in Glen Cook's Garret Files setting. Realistically it would be extremely challenging to design, especially since the books have one central character rather than a party,
It's not that hard now that we have games like Pelgrane Press' Cthulhu Confidential, designed specifically for one-on-one detective play. I suspect it won't be too hard to hack in magic and powers from other GUMSHOE games.
 


Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
It's not that hard now that we have games like Pelgrane Press' Cthulhu Confidential, designed specifically for one-on-one detective play. I suspect it won't be too hard to hack in magic and powers from other GUMSHOE games.
I can run a D&D game with only a single player too; I've been doing it here and there for almost 30 years. And requiring silver as a focus/component of casting magic (which is a conceit of the series if you aren't familiar with it) isn't a difficult change to make either.

It would be nice to have a slick setting handbook for it though, like what Green Ronin did with the Black Company setting back in '06.
 


I’ve always wanted to do a multi-world/multi-game campaign in the vein of something like Moorcock’s Eternal Champion. A threat to reality, heroes from multiple worlds banding together....that kind of thing. Like if Conan and Spider-Man and Buck Rogers and Aang and Philip Marlowe all went on an adventure together.

Something that delivers on the idea of what Rifts offers, without the total gonzo element and abysmal rules system.

The main obstacle is finding a rules system that can effectively blend genres and still function. So far, most systems that might be able to do this either fall short in some way or aren’t appealing to me.
 


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