Top Games Played On FG In 2018: D&D, Pathfinder, Savage Worlds

Fantasy Grounds has sent me over some graphs showing the top games played on its virtual tabletop platform throughout the whole of 2018. Unsurprisingly, the top three are D&D 5th Edition (67%), Pathfinder (12%), and Savage Worlds (5%). These are followed by Starfinder, D&D 3.5, Call of Cthulhu, D&D 4E, Star Wars, then Pathfinder 2. The figures are much the same as we've seen previously, with an increase by Starfinder and the appearance of Pathfinder 2 from July.

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Previous stats: 2016 | 2017
 
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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
That certainly explains the big drop, but it was declining every month, which I have a hard time seeing as a good sign.

It's a playtest program. That happens with all playtest programs - tons of people sign up, and a few make it to the end. This isn't the actual game.
 



Ash Mantle

Adventurer
Wow! 5e added over 19,000 users in a year - that is more than the total users of the next 9 highest games (in Dec. 18). It also increased its share by 3%

I like 5e, but it seems to me the marketing team is doing a pretty darn good job!

Well, 5e has a legitimately well designed and strong ruleset, helped by mostly fun and well written adventures and supplemental products, and also helped by streams and Critical Role. Sometimes, marketing can only go so far.
 

Warren LaFrance

First Post
As a Hobby we need to get DM's (GM or Story Teller) wanting
to run other games. The cost to buying all the rules
print and digital is a major friction point and certainty makes
it harder for story tellers to want to invest in another games.

Then throw in other expenses in life and well there you go.
 

SkidAce

Legend
Supporter
I agree with [MENTION=6803572]Kite474[/MENTION] that 5e is drawing a lot of people in to its own circle, but in our experience...it is like a gateway drug.

When we get new people we teach them 5e. Mainly because its our core game and more recently, its what they were looking for.

But after a bit they see, and we introduce, other games. Such as Shadowrun and FateCore.
 


vpuigdoller

Adventurer
I think that by D&D and Pathfinder having bigger and constant yearly Adventure Paths makes it easier for the busier ppl to run and play games since the prep time is vastly reduced and without the need to create the story yourself. More DMs (GMs) equals more people playing.
 

vpuigdoller

Adventurer
Some of this is driven by the quality of the ruleset automation. Savage Worlds has a very good ruleset. There is an excellent community AD&D ruleset as well. So that encourages more players of those systems to use FG.

Of course, the 5e ruleset is very good. FG was the first to win the WoTC license and they have all of the official WoTC 5e material available.

I agree 100% Ruleset automation in Fantasy grounds and Roll20 has helped a lot and makes it way easier to run and join games.
 

Reynard

Legend
I think that by D&D and Pathfinder having bigger and constant yearly Adventure Paths makes it easier for the busier ppl to run and play games since the prep time is vastly reduced and without the need to create the story yourself. More DMs (GMs) equals more people playing.

YMMV of course, but I have never found running APs in either PF or D&D to be time savers. In fact, for me it takes more time to pour through the adventure, extract the vital information, modify it to fit my particular group of players and their characters, and make it interesting and fun to run. Dragonheist is a perfect example: it is an okay adventure and an absolutely terrible heist, with a huge amount of obfuscated material buried in the prose and scattered around the book.

That said, I prefer FG for running things like the Yawning Portal adventures. It has worked great so far for Sunless Citadel and Forge of Fury. But those discrete modules have far less scattered info than, say, Storm King's Thunder.
 



So we now have our first evidence of the impact of NolanT getting caught behaving badly. More than 10,000 additional games per month were run on FG following the late September incident. Not all of them stuck around, and some of that increase is no doubt due to the release of WDDH and DoMM, but compared to the June increase, it seems most of that was due to the NolanT incident.

So, 10k games, if each "group" plays 3 times a month and has 5 people, 10k/3*5 = 16,667 people moved from Roll20 to FG. Now that's a totally rough estimate based upon limited data that has many factors and assumptions. But it does give a reasonable scale to the impact of the incident.

And, as mentioned below, since those are only games that are recorded using the Alias feature, the number is certainly higher.

Wow! 5e added over 19,000 users in a year - that is more than the total users of the next 9 highest games (in Dec. 18). It also increased its share by 3%

I like 5e, but it seems to me the marketing team is doing a pretty darn good job!
Not USERS, those are games played.

FG reports the number of games played using their "Alias" feature. Not total number of games played, or number of licenses or number of players, but rather just those games that run for at least an hour and use the Alias function to allow players to connect to the GM without using a direct IP address.
 


Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
Well yeah, it is explained right in the name.

I don't know about you, but I only play playtest stuff if it's fun or because someone is paying me to do it. Do people playtest a lot of stuff they don't find to be fun and which doesn't involve being a paid playtester?
 

Shasarak

Banned
Banned
I don't know about you, but I only play playtest stuff if it's fun or because someone is paying me to do it. Do people playtest a lot of stuff they don't find to be fun and which doesn't involve being a paid playtester?

I must admit that now I am curious about how often you get paid to playtest something and how I too can get on to that lucrative playtesting bandwagon?
 

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