• COMING SOON! -- Level Up: Advanced 5th Edition! Level up your 5E game! The standalone advanced 5E tabletop RPG adds depth and diversity to the game you love!
log in or register to remove this ad

 

Trinity Continuum Reboots Aberrant For The Better

333991.jpg

When Aberrant was first released in 1999, comic book superheroes were in a state of flux. The 90s had been a dark period where heroes shied away from the fantastic origins of the genre. Everyone was trying to prove that comics were serious business even as the genre swung back toward a mixture of big stories and grown-up storytelling in comics like Astro City and the Marvel Ultimate universe that came out a few years later. Aberrant set itself up as an engine to tell superhero stories different from contemporaries like Champions or Mutants & Masterminds. Those games sought to emulate the Big Two team stories while Aberrant wanted to be more like Watchmen. The core book showed a lot of potential but the line never quite lived up to it thanks to a Storyteller system that was mechanically stretched thin and a seeming desire to not want to tell superhero stories in a game about superheroes. Trinity Continuum: Aberrant looks to take a second bite at the apple with a redesigned system and a better sense of where it exists in the Trinity Continuum setting. Let’s dig inside the copy of the book sent to me by Onyx Path and see if the second time’s the charm.

The Aberrant setting is the middle child of the Trinity Continuum set between the far future space psychics of Aeon and the two-fisted pulp heroes of Adventure. When the book was first announced in the back of Aeon books, the assumption was that players would be playing the villains of the Aeon era, horribly mutated humans called Aberrants that nearly caused the world to nuke itself to stop their rise to power. Instead, Aberrant featured a near future setting where people around the world had manifested superpowers. These Novas, as they had come to be called, were part superheroes and part celebrity. Some had taken roles like their fictional forebears, others had signed up with government backed super teams, still others got sweet endorsement deals from corporations. The central question of the game was “What would you do with the powers of a god?” and set up players to answer them in a way that was a breath of fresh air compared to the World of Darkness.

Nowadays, however, comics have evolved. Media like The Boys and Invincible have taken a deeper look at how normal people with powers would live messy lives. The biggest media franchise in the world centers around superheroes and how they cause big changes in the world. What does a game like Aberrant have to offer audiences much more familiar with sophisticated superhero storytelling?

The world has changed. While the original Aberrant was coming fresh off the 90s conspiracy zeitgeist and framed every power player as a bad guy with a secret to hide, this version offers a more nuanced take. The good guys are trying to be good and the bad guys made some valid points. There’s a better chance of cross-factional play that doesn’t end in the players murdering each other. The titular Aberrants, for example, are the novas who push their powers to eventually become the dominant faction and bad guys of the future, but they are considered a fringe faction of the Teragen. The Teragen are loosely connected novas who want to explore their powers and push back on anyone who thinks they should be controlled or made to submit to law. Project Utopia is trying to protect people and use their powers for good, even as their efforts sometimes get bogged down by bureaucracy and worrying about public image. The rewrite also gives some depth and shading to the ‘signature’ characters in the setting. Caestus Pax is no longer just a jerk version of Superman, nor is Divis Mal simply a clone of Magneto’s ideals.

Trinity Continuum: Abberant offers a lot of good exploration of these tropes and the underlying system has much more thought put into it. Storypath is an evolution of the classic pool of d10s system that mixes in more narrative elements from Fate and other systems. Making a character is as easy as assembling packages based on where your character has been, what they are doing now and where they are going. Adding in nova powers makes things a little more complex, but designers Steve Kenson and writers Kenson, Fiona L.F. Kelly, Danielle Lauzon, Alejandro Melchior, Leath Sheales, Vera Vartanian, Ian A.A. Watson and Eddy Webb offer excellent examples of powers. There’s even an appendix for quick power packages that’s quite robust and handy for people who can describe their characters in terms of preexisting comic book heroes.

The book also benefits from having a clearer picture of the Trinity Continuum storyline. The 90s were the bad old days where games were trying to sell metaplot as a way to keep people buying books beyond new mechanical toys. Knowing how this game fits in the overall story sharpens the focus of play. This Aberrant knows that it's in the boom times when things are great and nobody would ever consider there are consequences to the big nova party. It also opens an interesting megacampaign for fans who would start with characters from the pulp era, revisit them in this era and see where they might have ended up in Aeon. If it’s good enough for Maxwell Mercer, it sounds like fun for a group of PCs, too.

Trinity Continuum: Aberrant is a great game for fans of modern action, deconstructionist comic book stories and sprawling multi-game chronicles.

If you enjoyed this review or found it informative, please consider buying the game through the included affiliate links.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Rob Wieland

Rob Wieland

Can anybody tells if there was any TTRPG more popular than Aberrant not linked with any licenced franchise?

If I was DC or Marvel I would be very worried about a rival company partnersiring with Paradox Interactive to produce their own superhero cinematigraphic universe based in Trinity.
 

Ghal Maraz

Explorer
Can anybody tells if there was any TTRPG more popular than Aberrant not linked with any licenced franchise?

If I was DC or Marvel I would be very worried about a rival company partnersiring with Paradox Interactive to produce their own superhero cinematigraphic universe based in Trinity.

Mutants & Masterminds. It came out a bit after Aberrant first edition, but it's been, more or less, the most popular not-licensed superheroic RPG.

As for Paradox... it hasn't got anything to do with this Trinity Continuum: Aberrant, which is solely a child of Onyx Path.
 

IanWatson

Explorer
Can anybody tells if there was any TTRPG more popular than Aberrant not linked with any licenced franchise?

I mean, D&D is an obvious one.

If I was DC or Marvel I would be very worried about a rival company partnersiring with Paradox Interactive to produce their own superhero cinematigraphic universe based in Trinity.

While we partner with Paradox for the White Wolf properties -- World of Darkness, Chronicles of Darkness, and Exalted -- Paradox does not own the Trinity Continuum, Scion, or Scarred Lands. Those belong wholly to Onyx Path, and have for almost a decade, well before the Paradox purchase.

In any case, the RPG industry is peanuts compared to the film industry. It's orders of magnitude difference. I don't think the Big Two are at all threatened -- or even aware -- of most of the superhero RPGs. We're not a threat.
 

We know the TTRPG is a small fish next to the cinematographic and videogame industries, but it can create new brands with a potential growing value.

I know Mutants & Masterminds is one of the most popular superhero RPG, but I unknow how famous are their characters and lore. I would mention Champions thanks the MMO, but this franchise is known thanks the videogame. I liked some ideas of "Brave New World".
 

First up - M&M wasn't a "contemporary" of Aberrant when it launched in 1999 because it didn't come out until 2002.

Brave New World was a contemporary with a fairly divergent setting history and a similar take in some ways but it never seemed to be as popular.

Champions was winding down a bit from the BBB era but there had been 4th edition supplements like Dark Champions that explored a lot of this 90's territory.

Aberrant was cool not so much for the rules (though that probably helped some veteran World of Darkness players make the jump) but because it had a specific setting with a story to tell - yep, metaplot- and that was a different take for a superhero game at least. I have the new Trinity Continuum rules but haven't read Aberrant yet so if the setting has been tuned up and we have a tighter set of rules this could be a really strong game now.
 

Ghal Maraz

Explorer
First up - M&M wasn't a "contemporary" of Aberrant when it launched in 1999 because it didn't come out until 2002.

So, uhm... did you notice that no one talked about them being contemporary? :)

Rules wise, yes... the new Aberrant is more narrative-driven and the dice poll are less... well... cumbersome. And the setting has been updated, taking in account the last twenty years both of real history and of superheroistic fiction.
 

So, uhm... did you notice that no one talked about them being contemporary? :)

Rules wise, yes... the new Aberrant is more narrative-driven and the dice poll are less... well... cumbersome. And the setting has been updated, taking in account the last twenty years both of real history and of superheroistic fiction.
Lol - Did you read the article?

"Aberrant set itself up as an engine to tell superhero stories different from contemporaries like Champions or Mutants & Masterminds."
 

robowieland

Adventurer
Lol - Did you read the article?

"Aberrant set itself up as an engine to tell superhero stories different from contemporaries like Champions or Mutants & Masterminds."

The original Aberrant line released books through 2002 and the d20 version came out in 2004.

I loved Dark Champions but it was still telling Iron Age comic book stories that connected back to Champions' Four Color universe. One of the key divergences in Aberrant that I loved was the idea that superpowers showed up one day (apparently) without decades of backstory.
 



Ghal Maraz

Explorer
Lol - Did you read the article?

"Aberrant set itself up as an engine to tell superhero stories different from contemporaries like Champions or Mutants & Masterminds."
I was somehow assuming you were talking about the replies, LOL... but still, they could be really classified as contemporaries.
I didn't know Steve Kenson worked on this new version. Thanks for the info as it makes me more likely to purchase it.
He's the lead designer, if I'm not wrong.
 

Azuresun

Adventurer
Trinity Continuum Reboots Aberrant For The Better.

Really?

No, not really...

Divis Mal and the Teragen are....a really interesting failure of storytelling to me. Mal was a fascinating character* and an interesting antagonist.....who was ruined by the writer falling much too in love with his own creation and declaring him objectively Right even when his philosophy had holes you could drive a truck through, and giving him a power level of literally "you lose times infinity". And things like Project Proteus were the usual White Wolf "twist" of "smear dung on everyone and call it morally grey" that was getting very predictable.

Aberrant is possibly the pinnacle of early-2000's White Wolf. A story that was on some HARD rails because the outcome had been determined by a different game line, the collectible metaplot fad, absurdly overpowered Elders designed to keep uppity PC's in line (such as the infamous module where the PC's are there to watch Yet Another Evil Superman and Hot Dr Manhattan have a super-brawl and cannot intervene in any way), the fetishisation of intelligence making someone an infalliable chessmaster, and trying to frame "everything you do will inevitably turn to crap" as being deep mature storytelling rather than nihilistic tedium. And it's gloriously dated, with expies of the Rock and Stone Cold Steve Austin (sorry, I mean the Face and Lance "Stone Badass" Stryker) smacktalking each other.

It does sound like the flaws are being acknowledged, and I've been interested in doing a "day one" supers game for a while, so I'm definitely interested in this.

*
There was a thread on rpg.net that had a really interesting breakdown of Mal's arc and his fundamental tragedy. I'll try to summarise it.

Michael Donaghal starts off as being both a genius and a gay man in the 1920's. This convinces him of two things--those who are different will face persecution, and those who are superior will inevitably be lonely. Even when he's transformed by the Hammersmith experiment and takes the alias of Dr Primoris alongside other people with extraordinary powers, he's still notably above his peers, and that feeling of isolation is not helped by his unrequited love for the only man he considers close to his intellectual equal.

The Aeon Society collapses, and Primoris heads off to his Fortress of Solitude. And over time, he decides that if he can't find peers, he'll trigger the creation of them. Thus the first novas come to be. But this is the first shock that Mal experiences--their experiences of suddenly being elevated above the common herd are not the ones of isolation and rejection that Mal had come to believe was inevitable. They're mostly regarded as heroes and celebrities, people love them! Rather than looking beyond humankind, they're embracing it, whether as heroes or villains!

That prompts the Null Manifesto, a rambling treatise that John Galt would be proud of, about how novas are a superior species to humans and cannot be constrained by human laws. This, by the way, is terribly ironic. Mal did not gain his powers because he "deserved" them or had any innate superiority, he got them through blind chance. If he'd been in bed with the flu on the day of the Hammersmith experiment, the world would never have heard of Dr Primoris, and he'd have lived and died as an unusually smart human. A better path might be to find a way to elevate all of humankind, but when you just want a few pals who are on your level, that's not a priority. A more cynical function of the Manifesto is to aggravate the divide between humans and Novas, hastening the inevitable (to Mal) process where they shed these silly mortal connections and embrace their inner divinity.

And once again, most of the novas get the wrong end of the wrong stick. Some of them simply use the Manifesto as an excuse to be every tedious twerp you've met on the internet who considers "sheeple" a cutting insult, some use it as licence to commit crimes, and others miss the point entirely and start to worship Mal as their creator rather than aspiring to be his equal. And Mal is still quietly fuming that they Just Don't Get It, and he doesn't feel any closer to his dream of finally having people on his level, to overcome that insurmoutable (to him) gap between the clever and stupid, between the superior and inferior.

And the painful irony of Mal is that he'll never create the posthuman society / Cool Kids Clubhouse he dreams of. At best, he'll create several fractious alien demigods who agree on nothing, have no common cause and probably can't even communicate. He's the proof that his own cause is doomed, having become too inhuman and isolated to effectively convey his own vision to others, despite his super-intelligence. He'll be far lonelier among his perfect society than he ever was among baseline humans.
 
Last edited:


eyeheartawk

Works 60% of the time, every time
Interesting. Not a big fan of narrative elements being added to trad RPGs but way be worth a look. I remember the 90s version, and at the time thinking, "no thanks" because Storyteller would break with even medium power level vampires, I couldn't imagine it holding up in an actual supers game.
 

Ghal Maraz

Explorer
Interesting. Not a big fan of narrative elements being added to trad RPGs but way be worth a look. I remember the 90s version, and at the time thinking, "no thanks" because Storyteller would break with even medium power level vampires, I couldn't imagine it holding up in an actual supers game.
It's a ground-up rewrite of the d10s dice poll mechanic, being at the same time familiar and engineered to use a more modern, narrative-focused resolution mechanic.
You can read about the basic resolution engine of the Storypath System here, so you can get a better idea: DriveThruRPG.com .
 

Related Articles

Visit Our Sponsor

Latest threads

Level Up!

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top