What are you reading, Septembre 2018 edition

Currently reading "The Quarry" - Iain Banks' last novel (though not the last I have to read).

Next up will be the "Star Wars Sourcebook" from that 30th anniversary reprint. And one of these days I'm going to get around to reading some Shakespeare...
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
Finished Hambly’s Dragonsbane, and wow, was it wonderful. Deep and thoughtful, with magic, dragons, and dragonslayers. The praises of this novel, I think, should be much louder.

Also finished Scott Lynch’s In The Stacks. The short story is pretty enjoyable, and it was nice to see him write outside of the Gentlemen Bastards world (even if wait for the next book is starting to enter Martin/Rothfuss territory).

Now I’m reading Fonda Lee’s Jade City.
 

Janx

Adventurer
I now be reading what be the latest rag from that scallywag Drew Hayes, Superpowered Year 4.

Happy International Talk Like a Pirate Day
 

jasper

Rotten DM
Just finished Target Rich Environment Vol 1, by Larry Correia, Robert A. Heinlein : In Dialogue with his Century Vol 1: Learning Curve 1907-1948 by William H. Patternson Jr.
Working on Waterdeep Heist, Inferno Squad, and Aurora Rising Complete Collection by G.S. Jennsen
 

vpuigdoller

Explorer
Read Timeless by RA Salvatore last week, was fun. Now I started Saga of Old City by Gary Gygax which I was very lucky to find at thrift store. Enjoying it so far.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
Reading Wintersmith (Terry Pratchett's Discworld in the Tiffany Aching stories) and Brother in Arms (part of Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan Saga).
 

Richards

Adventurer
I started a book I picked up at a library book sale for fifty cents because it was supposed to be a new take on zombies. It's called The Silent Army by James Knapp and it's got several things going against it. First of all, despite being a standalone novel, it seems like it's a continuation of his first book (which I haven't read). But more importantly, it's written from the points of view of three or four rotating characters, and each is written in the first person narrative. Each section starts with the person's name as a header so you know whose turn it is, but if you pick it up in the middle of a section (if you didn't make it to the end of a section the last time you put it down), it gets very confusing and I find myself frequently backtracking to see who "I" is now.

I'm over halfway done so I'm going to plow through it just to find out what happens with the main plot (somebody's stolen a dozen handheld, brick-sized nukes and is threatening to destroy a city and send in a bunch of "revivors" - the zombielike animated bodies of people who have given over control of their consciousnesses to a corporation/government for a set amount of time in order to climb the social status ladder once their time is up - to take out any opposition afterwards).

Anyway, I'm underwhelmed.

Johnathan
 

Zaukrie

Adventurer
Finished Hambly’s Dragonsbane, and wow, was it wonderful. Deep and thoughtful, with magic, dragons, and dragonslayers. The praises of this novel, I think, should be much louder.

Also finished Scott Lynch’s In The Stacks. The short story is pretty enjoyable, and it was nice to see him write outside of the Gentlemen Bastards world (even if wait for the next book is starting to enter Martin/Rothfuss territory).

Now I’m reading Fonda Lee’s Jade City.
I second Dragonsbane for sure.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
Finished up Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett and Mirror Dance by Lois McMaster Bujold. I've been reading Discworld/Tiffany Aching and rereading the Vorkosigan Saga somewhat interleaved.

Brother in Arms + Mirror Dance (very linked in my head) are perhaps my favorites in the Vorkosigan series so far. I need a word for that - they are not my favorite in the entire series, and I don't want to give faint praise of "My Nth favorite", even if you can easily compare books at very different parts of a long series. Maybe Favirst as a port-mantrue of Favorite and First. For a series that kept getting better, every book could be the favirst.

I've enjoyed the Tiffany Aching books, but this was not my "favirst". I quite liked Miss Treason and "Boffo", and it was solid. Just not quite blowing the others away. Considering the company it keeps, The Wee Free Men and A Hatful of Sky, that's not an insult that it wasn't over that bar. I think one point is that with all of the book I've enjoyed Granny Weatherwax in, she seems a bit ... mild? ... to Tiffany. Granny will take her dearest friends to task when they are being stupid, I could do with more acerb from her.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Haven’t been reading much fiction lately,* but I’ve been devouring cook books, cooking magazines, and cooking websites, trying to up my game even further.




* my backlog is truly depressing.
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
Finished Fonda Lee’s Jade City. Pretty good non-Western fantasy, though it loses some of its momentum around the middle part, only to regain it by the end.

Next up is Pratchett’s I Shall Wear Midnight. Just about the season for witches, really.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
Late last night cracked open Memory, by Lois McMaster Bujold. Today when I picked it up for lunch I was surprised I was already 198 pages into it.

The protagonist. who normally spends every book in a headlong rush of "forward momentum", juggling situations and people while playing Xanatos Speedchess, spends the first 225 pages of this book coming to more and more of a complete stop. (Softcover page count. That's a touch less than half.)

And then on page 226 it all comes back. Very satisfying.

I'm reminded a bit that Tolkien wrote his travelogue parts to be long for the reader as well so they would have a sense of the experience. That is ... somewhat the case, but in this case each barrier, each slowing was personally important to the character - built up over all the proceeding books of the series. This, while immensely satisfyingly full of callbacks, would be a lousy first book to jump into. The callback to Mountains of Mourning had me teary-eyed again, just like when I first read that short story.
 

Richards

Adventurer
I'm reading a science fiction short story collection by Rudy Rucker, called The 57th Franz Kafka. He's pretty quirky, in a good way.

Johnathan
 

Degutis

Visitor
I'm reading a science fiction short story collection by Rudy Rucker, called The 57th Franz Kafka. He's pretty quirky, in a good way.


Johnathan

Hi,
I've just googled it :) After My Father's Mask by Joe Hill I'm pretty sure there's nothing creepier that can impress me more. I've read all books (and book reviews, naturally) by Joe Hill (The Fireman is my favorite one) and only last week I found out that Stephen King is his father! Crazy world. In case someone is interested, there's an interview by Paul Michael Anderson (Joe Hill Remembers Where He Came From).
 

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