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What is your biggest RPG heartbreak?

For a while in my gaming circle there were two ongoing weekly D&D games: mine, and the Other Game. There were a few crossover players, but mostly folks played in one or the other.

Over time, the players in my game became more difficult to schedule. Eventually I had to fold my game. I tried to join the Other Game (again, made up of my friends), but they already had six players and decided seven would be too many. So I wound up with no D&D group for a while.

Now that was heartbreaking... Still stings to this day! As a result, I always make my campaigns open to new players or drop-in guests.
 

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billd91

Hobbit on Quest
For a while in my gaming circle there were two ongoing weekly D&D games: mine, and the Other Game. There were a few crossover players, but mostly folks played in one or the other.

Over time, the players in my game became more difficult to schedule. Eventually I had to fold my game. I tried to join the Other Game (again, made up of my friends), but they already had six players and decided seven would be too many. So I wound up with no D&D group for a while.

Now that was heartbreaking... Still stings to this day! As a result, I always make my campaigns open to new players or drop-in guests.
DAAAMMMMNNNN. That's cold.
 

Sithlord

Explorer
For a while in my gaming circle there were two ongoing weekly D&D games: mine, and the Other Game. There were a few crossover players, but mostly folks played in one or the other.

Over time, the players in my game became more difficult to schedule. Eventually I had to fold my game. I tried to join the Other Game (again, made up of my friends), but they already had six players and decided seven would be too many. So I wound up with no D&D group for a while.

Now that was heartbreaking... Still stings to this day! As a result, I always make my campaigns open to new players or drop-in guests.
I once ran a game with 12 players plus henchman. And if anyone else dropped by they would have been more than welcome to play.
 


Sithlord

Explorer
How much faster 4e ended than it should have, and the direction they went in for 5e, I didn't like it, then for various unrelated reasons (my 4e book having memories of someone specific who I didn't want to think about) I ended up playing 5e a few years later, but looking back on it, my first instinct about the direction it was going in was right.
It wasn’t my edition. But there are things they did well I would like to see
 

More than a little weird so many peeps are saying "4e."
Think most gamers would be thrilled to have a game that got half as many books as 4th Ed got. Even without counting all the online content
If I get a book each year for some of my faves I feel blessed


My heartbreaks are the usual. Groups that fall apart just when things are getting good. Workin towards a big storyline climax and the game falls apart. Just getting into the groove with the party and my character and someone moves away or gets a new bird and doesn't have time to hang anymore
Boring really
 

More than a little weird so many peeps are saying "4e."
Think most gamers would be thrilled to have a game that got half as many books as 4th Ed got. Even without counting all the online content
If I get a book each year for some of my faves I feel blessed


My heartbreaks are the usual. Groups that fall apart just when things are getting good. Workin towards a big storyline climax and the game falls apart. Just getting into the groove with the party and my character and someone moves away or gets a new bird and doesn't have time to hang anymore
Boring really
Context changes it, its plenty of content and time, but the way it ended was very sudden and it was after they had discussed having plans for years to come, so i think that's a sticking point.
 



aco175

Legend
I have not played that many other roleplaying games over the years. Back in the 80s we played Twilight2000, Marvel superheroes, Rene Quest, and a couple others. These mostly lasted only a couple weeks before going back to D&D. None were terrible, but just were not D&D.

I did play in a Dark Sun campaign my friend ran for a few months. It was not my thing, but he was part of the group so we played what he wanted before someone else got to choose what they wanted.

I do not like having a convention and not have D&D slots for the whole day and then I feel like I'm cheated when I need to play something else.
 



overgeeked

B/X Known World
Not playing with more friends.

How 4E played at the table. I loved literally everything about the game. Everything. But it was so grindingly dull to actually play.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Earlier this year, I convinced the group to try out Ironsworn, and it's gone so much better than I could have imagined or hoped. Our group is stoked to play Ironsworn now.

It's just been time to try new stuff. For sure Ironsworn will continue. We're going to play some Tiny D6 / Tiny Frontiers Sci-Fi. We're definitely going to jump back into FFG Star Wars / Genesys at some point. The combat model in Spellbound Kingdoms sounds different and intriguing enough that I'm definitely going to give it a shot, even though I think the setting is kind of whack. My kids love the Dragon Prince cartoon, and I've been intrigued by the Cortex+ system for a long time. And if Swords of the Serpentine ever makes it out of "beta preview", I'll probably buy a copy of that too.
Off topic, but @innerdude you may be interested in this if you like Ironsworn AND Scifi. It might be your peanut butter and chocolate: Ironsworn: Starforged
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
No heartbreaks, but I def share some disappointments with many here especially re: Numenera, GURPS 4e, early ending of D&D 4e (ameliorated by the fact that 5e is pretty darn good).

I guess my MegaTraveller game never completing due to me moving away (back in early 90's, no online gaming then).
 

Richards

Legend
For me, it was when Dave Gross stepped away as the editor of Dragon magazine. One of the very first things the new editor did was to kill the "fiction and footnote" format of the "Ecology" articles in the magazine, making them into what I considered to be dry, encyclopedic entries that were kind of boring to read. It was particularly painful for me because at the time I had six "Ecology" articles sitting on Dave's desk that had already been revised to meet his editorial change requests and which would have been published had he remained at the editor's desk, but which the new editor just flat-out bulk rejected. And, having had more "Ecology" articles printed than any other writer (at least in the print version of the magazine - I haven't kept up with it since it went digital) and having been pretty instrumental in getting the "Ecology" series revived (it had been fallow for 17 issues in a row when my first "Ecology" article was published, and then I was responsible for writing 24 of the next 39 entries in the series), I kind of took the new format rather personally.

So that took away the vast majority of the articles I'd been writing for Dragon. And then a few years later when 4E came along, I saw right away that was nothing I was going to be interested in, and just like that my freelancing career was pretty much over. (Bummer, too, because it was really nice having a hobby I really enjoyed that also came with a paycheck as an added bonus - most hobbies don't work that way!)

But, on the plus side, shortly after the death of my freelancing career I gained my current gaming group, so all of the effort I would have put into getting articles and adventures published in Dragon and Dungeon magazines was now able to be channeled into making a good gaming experience for them. And I have certainly had a blast gaming with my current group.

Johnathan
 

Warhammer frp. I love that game, always wanted to play more or it (we had a small 2 playees, 1 GM thing going during highschool), never got a group for it going. So, I'm buying TeW campaign books for 4th edition again, they'll look splendid next to all my other unused 1st and 2nd edition stuff ;)
 

Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
Supporter
Nobody want to talk about HoL? I am disappoint. Before I even knew what hacking was I was messing with that basic rules set to run Horror Cthulhu stuff. It's actually a great basic mechanic, way before that was a thing that mattered.
 

corwyn77

Explorer
Every time I get a new RPG that I'm excited about, only to discover it doesn't come with half a dozen good players in the box.
That's always something of a heartbreak for me.
You need more malleable players. I once ran 6 consecutive campaigns without repeating systems once. But then, they enjoy my games and none of them wanted to gm.
 

delericho

Legend
Shadowrun for me. I've run it exactly once - I had what I thought was a cool concept for a short campaign, but I hadn't banked on (1) my players knowing much more about the quirks of the system than I did and (2) their tendency towards power-gaming.

It took us hours to get through character creation, and about half an hour for me to realise that it just wasn't going to work. :( Oh well, you live and learn.
So I did my reading, got excited to play, etc. The GM even let me play a werewolf PC at the start, which I thought could be pretty awesome. Got my PC created and we started our first session.

The rest of the players had a Glitter Boy, Juicer, etc. And I had this PC who at best might be able to do 1d4 MDC while everyone else was going crazy.
The one and only time I played Pathfinder felt a lot like that. I had a character that was actually pretty good, all things considered. Unfortunately, the DM was of the school that accepted anything that felt cool, even if it wasn't balanced, so all the other characters were comparative gods. In particular, there was one guy whose character could do everything mine could do, but better. Oh, and he could fly, too.

(The difference, I think, is that RIFTS had that stuff baked right in to the rules, whereas this case was about the DM selectively disregarding the rules.)
 

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