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D&D General What published module have you run or played the most?


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werecorpse

Adventurer
I have only rarely revisited modules. Back in the day in my playing circle once you played in it you had “played it” and thee was a concern replaying it would be cheating or would spoil it so you didn’t go back. So the number of modules I played multiple times is very low.
I think I played G1 2 times in the 80’s and 90’s and ran it once in the 2000’s converted to 3e
 

Keep on the Borderlands, by far, since I've ran it at least a dozen times or so. I'm guessing a lot of DMs from that era are the same, since it was the premiere introductory adventure of the day. Castle Amber would be number 2, with about 6-8 plays, and I think Isle of the Ape would be third, as my high level 1E group ran through it multiple times (4-5 times). Most other adventures cap out at about 3.

Lost Mines of Phandelver is currently at only 3 plays, but I expected it to go much higher. Like KotBL and Sunless Citadel, it's an excellent introductory adventure, and I use it as my staple for teaching 5E. With COVID putting my FLGS out of business, I probably won't be teaching new players for quite some time.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
The one I've run the most often is X1, "The Isle of Dread." I think I've run this module for every gaming group I've DM'd since the 1980s. I've run it as-written about a half dozen times, but I've also reskinned it to be a plane crash survival adventure for D20 Modern, a Call of Cthulhu mystery adventure, and a Norse-themed seafaring adventure. It's easily my favorite.

Others that I've run more than twice: X4, "Master of the Desert Nomads" (and its sequel X5, "Temple of Death"), CM1 "Test of the Warlords," and X11, "Saga of the Shadow Lord." The entire BECM line of modules are the best D&D adventures ever written, in my opinion, but these are at the top of the heap.
 
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Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
I've run "Court of the Necromancers" from the Al-Qadim Cities of Bone sourcebox several times. I love it, and bene when I'm not running it I tend to use parts of it all the time.

I've also run B4: The Lost City a few times; that one just goes so differently depending on how a party approaches it.
 


Lanefan

Victoria Rules
The one I've run the most often is X1, "The Isle of Dread."
This is one of those modules I've thus far somehow missed at every opportunity. Never run it, never played it.

And that, of course, would be the corollary thread to this one: what classic modules you thus far have somehow managed to miss.
 

Don't think I've run any modules more than once in a few decades (back in the B2 days when we couldn't afford to buy more modules). There are just too many good modules to spend time running them again :)
 

Ho boy....
Keep in the borderland. This was the adventure I used to run with new young players. I can't count how many times I ran it.

In Second place ToEE, around 3 dozens times... with different players over 38 years and the adaptation of Goodman Games will probably prompt me to run it again...

Third place will be The sinister secret of Saltmarsh.

Fourth place will de Desert of desolation and Ravenloft I6.

But the Keep on the borderland beats them all. By far.
 

Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh is in the top spot for me. I’ve run it under every edition of D&D since 1e and a couple of times in GURPS.

I also got a lot of mileage out of the Desert of Desolation and the Cult of the Reptile God. Also ran a GURPS version of the former.
 
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Enrico Poli1

Adventurer
B2 Keep on the Borderlands
X1 Isle of Dread
Age of Worms AP
Savage Tide AP (in this one, we were TPKed at least 20 times; probably this is the one we made more attempts)
 

There are only four I've run more than once, that I can immediately think of, and only the first two in the actual edition/game they were made for (i.e. 2E). It's hard to say which I've run/played "most" because of the different levels of commitment. If it's like "technically brought out and used", it'll be Lords of Darkness, because I've often run a single adventure from it as a sort of "test-run" for a system, but in terms of time spent, it's a toss-up between Dragon Mountain and Night Below, probably Dragon Mountain narrowly wins because I've played it once and run it twice, whereas Night Below I've run part of it (it's huge) twice.

1) Dragon Mountain (1993) - A somewhat controversial/marmite 2E boxed set with DiTerlizzi art and some really cool ideas, and really the genesis of the modern vision of kobolds.

2) Night Below (1995) - Never run all of this, but I've run part of it, it's a huge Underdark-set campaign-thing if you're not familiar with it, very cool.

The following two I think I've only run once in 2E, but have run in other systems more than once - later editions of D&D and Dungeon World particularly:

3) Lords of Darkness (1988) - A collection of short adventures involving undead (possibly one is wererats), set in the Forgotten Realms, quite varied and pretty atmospheric despite them being very short.

4) Temple, Tower, and Tomb (1994) - Three kind of bad and Tomb of Horrors-but-less-so-ish adventures with a really cheesy setup that at the same time, are incredibly easy to drop into a campaign, because the setup is so cheesy and it's all so self-contained. This is where my players scientifically determined that wood does not conduct Evil, but metal does, so Evil is presumably electrical in nature.

And that, of course, would be the corollary thread to this one: what classic modules you thus far have somehow managed to miss.
Dangerous talk! Not only would the lists potentially be long but we'd have to determine what counts as "classic", and I dunno if things have changed in the last 15-20 years but I would steadfastly call, say Dragon Mountain "classic" and others would call it newfangled rubbish!
 

There are three that I have run twice (but not in the same edition): Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh, White Plume Mountain and Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan.
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest (he/him)
I've run Ravenloft 3 times, in 3 different editions (1e, 2e with House on Gryphon Hill, and 3e). That's the most I've run a single adventure.
Keep on the Borderlands is kind of second (but also kind of first) since I've run the B2 version twice and the 25th anniversary Return to the Keep on the Borderlands twice now. They're substantially different but similar so I'm on the fence between calling it twice each or 4x for the whole concept.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Dangerous talk!
Dangerous talk is what I do, don't'cha know. :)
Not only would the lists potentially be long but we'd have to determine what counts as "classic", and I dunno if things have changed in the last 15-20 years but I would steadfastly call, say Dragon Mountain "classic" and others would call it newfangled rubbish!
True.

But as an example, numerous posters in this thread have said they've run U1 Secret of Saltmarsh a bunch of times and yet I've never touched it as either player or DM*.

* - other than stealing its caves map as a time-saver for something completely unrelated.
 

I actually have never run a module twice. Not because I wouldn't enjoy it, but simply because I tend to set all of the modules I play on my long-running homebrew, so having two groups of adventurers go through the exact same events in the same locations on separate occasions would break my sense of versimilitude.

The closest I have got is because I tend to chop up some modules, and use bits and pieces with different groups. (Meaning I might reuse an encounter somewhere else). I'm not going to have two different groups kill Belak though.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
Probably Ravenloft variants. I’ve played in the 3.5 version twice, although both ended prematurely, and am currently running Curse of Strahd for the second time, and will most likely run it a third time for another group.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
I actually have never run a module twice. Not because I wouldn't enjoy it, but simply because I tend to set all of the modules I play on my long-running homebrew, so having two groups of adventurers go through the exact same events in the same locations on separate occasions would break my sense of versimilitude.
Heh - this is in fact exactly what I'm running right now!

A dungeon first cleared out by a group some five in-game years ago has become a headache again; and when a completely new group goes in they start bringing identical items back to town as were found five years ago and, on exchanging stories with some locals who remember the first group (all of whom are long gone from the region), are probably facing identical foes as well even down to their names.

I-as-DM have an in-game explanation for this. I might be able to squeeze quite a bit of adventuring out of various PCs trying to figure it out, though. :)
 

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