D&D 5E What to spend your loot on?

Sloblock

Explorer
Greetings one and all

We are almost at the end of Hoard of the Dragon Queen, the players have amassed a large amount of loot.

The PHB has some good equipment tables, but does anyone have a good price guide for other stuff?

As I feel when they get back to a city they will want to spend, spend, spend.

any help would be appreciated
 

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Prism

Explorer
I allow the players to buy common potions and 1st and 2nd level scrolls as long there is a wizards guild or local temples willing to sell. One of the characters is a priest of Waukeen and uses trade contacts to sell unwanted magic items for a decent price. I also will allow them to hear rumours of items for sale/trade. I'll probably allow roll on the treasure table from time to time.

The party also hires guards and scouts to adventure with which can eat up some of their cash.
 

Greetings one and all
We are almost at the end of Hoard of the Dragon Queen, the players have amassed a large amount of loot.


I roll to disbelieve! A large amount of loot from Hoard of the food stamp Queen? :lol:


Spending money is very dependent on campaign style. If the players just basically play through adventure paths and don't interact with the world much beyond that then spending options are more limited.
 

steeldragons

Steeliest of the dragons
Epic
Training.

Finding and paying a mentor (let alone getting them to agree to train you in the first place), accommodation/room & board for the requisite downtime [we generally use 1 week per level], travel (perhaps) necessary to locate a worth mentor...For easy calculation I've generally always used...minimum...1000gp per level they are training to. "Want to be 5th level? 5000gp, please." For 5e, I'd knock that down to 100gp/level.

This, of course, is all subject to interactive/"negotiating" roleplay, any organizational benefits/detriments, etc... Are you a member of the city's thieves' guild? Ok, half price for you. Are you a member of this clerical order/worship the same god? Half price. A paladin needing to train with a fighter and cleric because there are no paladins [of appropriate level] around instead? Maybe needs to pay double or 150%...or can find a War Cleric of appropriate/matching alignment for normal price. Mages/spellcasters gaining a new level of spell slots maybe, double it...or just tack on a flat extra 500gp (for the new materials, complexity of instruction, etc...) that is necessary for this new level of magical mastery.

This, of course, isn't even getting into the possibility/probability/necessity of stronghold building, manning, and upkeep expenses as you get into higher levels...since you'll need somewhere safe/stable to hang out for upwards of 9, 10, 15 weeks while you're training up.

Parties that have to train nearly never have "too much" money. :]
 


Blackwarder

Adventurer
Minions! Let them start their own mercenary company! Or buy a place among the masked lords, or buy a manor, the options are endless!

Warder
 

Crothian

First Post
We took over a town. We bribed the mayor to get influence and secretly invested to gain percentages of key businesses. We spent money to make the population like us so when the hostile takeover happened they were on our side.
 



Wik

First Post
In my games, at the end of every adventure, there's a "night market" where the magic item smugglers hold an auction. I have a few items up for auction, and the PCs bid on what they want. Because there are other adventurers bidding, you can usually see the PCs lose a HUGE amount of money for items they want. Last time, we had a bard spend something like three times the listed price for a magical bardic instrument.

In the same markets, I also list several interesting, but not necessarily powerful, treasures. For example, in the last one, PCs bid on a rock that teaches you the language of earth elementals. The eladrin wizard won a petrified pseudodragon (which he hasn't been able to turn to flesh as of yet). Lost maps for dungeons were up for sale, as well as plots of land. In the next market, I plan on selling a black market dragon egg (species unknown), as well as young exotic mounts. Plus some cool foods, objects d'art (for the PCs' keep), and unidentified magical potions. All for auction, of course.

Finally, why not give them access to services? If they know an assassin who will remove foes for 5K a pop, some players will take advantage. Unusual one-use items are always fun to bid on, but so are weird toys... things like shield guardians, smaller constructs, and weird mysteries.

Having PCs spend on training is a great idea, as is having them spend money on henchmen and hirelings. If you make building a home a part of the game, and drum up a few mechanics (Paizo's Ultimate Campaign is a great starting point), you'd be amazed at how quickly and readily your players will spend money. I'd not be surprised to see them spend twice as much money for a spiral staircase as opposed to a normal one, if the option is in front of them. After all, a lot of people want to build their own home in real life, but lack the funds to do so. Give them an option, and they'll spend all sorts of money to realize their dreams in a fictional space. This is why paper doll computer games work so well!

What about pets? Dogs and horses and the like are simple. But what if the PCs purchase an elven dog for 1.5K? Or a baby drakeling? Or a faerie dragon egg? Not all pets need to grant combat advantages, of course. Some could just help keep an eye on the camp while the PCs sleep.

Diviners, fortune-tellers, and the like are another option. PCs could get their fortunes read. Imagine if they visit an important oracle, and she tells the PC of a dark future. For 2 or 3K, you could have the player roll, say, 4d20, and record the results. That PC can draw upon those rolls in much the same way as a diviner character. A lot of players would love that!

You could sell all sorts of class abilities this way. One use potions that replicate a barbarian's rage. For a LOT of money, you could sell a monk's first level unarmed combat damage as a permanent ability. A non-rogue could spend 5K to learn thieves' cant, or druidic. You could sell training for weapon proficiencies, armour proficiencies, or tool proficiencies. Instead of 250 GP over 250 days, imagine 3,000 GP for a 30-day training course in how to use masonry tools (or whatever item your players have their eyes on).

As a really fun one, you could have an NPC with a random item, such as a Deck of Many Things. He charges people three or four thousand GP, per card drawn.... no refunds. Have fun with this one... and watch your more risk-taking players happily destroy themselves.

Likewise, spending money on cool-looking arms and armour is an option. High class clothing is the same thing. Have PCs be obligated to throw a few high falutin' parties. Or, if they get themselves an expensive campaign manager, they could run for office!

Having a lot of money, and NOT being required to spend it on items in a never-ending progress quest, is a good thing. Open the game up, drop a few hints if your players are stalled for ideas, and I guarantee - they'll find things to spend cash on.
 

Greetings one and all

We are almost at the end of Hoard of the Dragon Queen, the players have amassed a large amount of loot.

The PHB has some good equipment tables, but does anyone have a good price guide for other stuff?

Depends on your goals.

If you want to become richer:
Merchant ships
Factories
Land (charge rent) or landed titles (same)
Spell research
Information
Spelljamming helms

If you want to become more dangerous:
Exotic Poisons
Spell components for Planar Binding/Gate/Planar Ally
Mercenaries/hirelings (hobgoblins are great)
Warhorses/hippogriffs/griffins
Funerals and death benefits for hirelings
Spell research
Information/spies
Spelljamming helms
 
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Diviners, fortune-tellers, and the like are another option. PCs could get their fortunes read. Imagine if they visit an important oracle, and she tells the PC of a dark future. For 2 or 3K, you could have the player roll, say, 4d20, and record the results. That PC can draw upon those rolls in much the same way as a diviner character. A lot of players would love that!

I sometimes allow Augury and Divination to function this way, if I don't have any good concrete information to give out about the immediate future. The way it works for Augury is that if I don't have a good answer as DM about "is it weal or woe if we attack these trolls right now?", I will roll 1d100. On 1-25, the answer is "Weal" and you can have advantage on one roll during the next 30 minutes. On 76-100, the answer is "Woe" and I will impose disadvantage on one roll during the next 30 minutes. Otherwise, it is indeterminate. If you cast it more than once (so the result is random) then when you try to apply your Weal/Woe I will randomly check at that point whether it "true" weal or something else--you could wind up with disadvantage where you wanted advantage!

Divination is similar except that instead of mere advantage/disadvantage, you get a Portent-like die roll that lasts for seven days or until you re-cast Divination. You can use it under the same circumstances as Portent.

In the case of Divination I would ask the player as a courtesy to retroactively flavor it as knowledge of the future. "I suddenly realize: the portent promised that when the dark one's shadow falls across my face, the time of endings is at hand! I cast Imprisonment and he rolls a 2." In the case of Augury we can just treat it as good luck. (It's a dissociated mechanic, under the player's control but not the PC's, but at least the PC is aware that good luck is pending so he can respond appropriately.)

In all these cases I wouldn't offer these random benefits unless the outcome is in doubt. If 5th level characters ask an Augury whether it's good to attack the ancient shadow dragon right now, I'll just give them straight-up "Woe." No amount of good luck is going to overcome that force disparity.
 

Bayonet

First Post
- Buying a business, paying the employees. It can pay dividends if they do everything correctly. Roll on random disaster/profit tables on the DM's whim.

- Buying or building a stronghold, paying the guards/servants.

- Buying a ship, paying the crew.

- Paying for training (you guys hang out in town for yadda yadda amount of time, experts in these fields live nearby, you can pay x amount of gold to train to be proficient in whatever skill)

- Paying for skilled help (blacksmiths for weapons and armor, alchemists for potions, scribes, cartographers, scouts, porters, etc.)

- Taxes

- Bribes, pardons, being sued for damages (the average murderhobo party is going to generate some bad will, harass them with guardsmen and angry mobs until they make it better)

- Carousing!
 



Uller

Adventurer
Depending on town size I let them make investigation checks or persuasion checks to find magic items for sale in the town. Then I will roll on the appropriate hoard table to see what is available. There is always common and uncommon potions and scrolls available.
 

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