When another player builds a clone of your character.

Fauchard1520

Explorer
Have you guys ever been in this situation? You roll up a character with a fairly standard archetype -- big dumb guy with greatsword; snarky necromancer; etc. -- only to find that another player is horning in on the same conceptual space. Is this a "stop copying me" problem, or do you feel like there's enough room in the campaign for similar character types? And if the players in questions do feel like, "I called shotgun on seductive bard," how did you resolve it?

Comic for illustrative purposes.
 

pogre

Adventurer
I run tables with more players than the average and overlap is inevitable. It does not bother me as a DM, but my youngest son goes to great length to try and carve out his own niche. When someone intrudes on his shtick (from his point of view) it does bother him.
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
Are we playing Paranoia? Send in the clones ... cue Mel Torme. Anyways, usually no, because sometimes they are complimentary, sometimes a good backup.
 

uzirath

Explorer
Have you guys ever been in this situation? You roll up a character with a fairly standard archetype -- big dumb guy with greatsword; snarky necromancer; etc. -- only to find that another player is horning in on the same conceptual space. Is this a "stop copying me" problem, or do you feel like there's enough room in the campaign for similar character types? And if the players in questions do feel like, "I called shotgun on seductive bard," how did you resolve it?
I've definitely seen this happen before. It's a great opportunity to add depth to both characters. It's a good time for a player-to-player (or whole group) conversation about how to differentiate them. Maybe one of the greatswords gets swapped for a maul and one guy thinks he's a real Cassanova and the other one is a glutton (with a particular fancy for sweets): two fun numbskulls. Or maybe they are brothers. Or twins. Or from rival nations/tribes. It may be that the "copycat" player is inexperienced and doesn't have a good grasp of how to create effective role-playing hooks for their character. With a bit of guidance, I suspect that they would prefer to develop a unique character too.
 

Hand of Evil

Adventurer
Yep, it happens. The first time it happened in my game, I made them twins, there are some bad movies on the subject that you can get hints from on how to make it fun. ;)
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Have you guys ever been in this situation? You roll up a character with a fairly standard archetype -- big dumb guy with greatsword; snarky necromancer; etc. -- only to find that another player is horning in on the same conceptual space.
Where I come from, we talk about our concepts before character creation, such that overlap only happens when the group thinks it is warranted.
 

Adamant

Explorer
We have 2 tempest clerics in our ghosts of saltmarsh campaign, but even with similar powers the personalities are completely different. Mine is the good, solid, reliable cleric of valkur(Planeshifted to greyhawk because I didn't know we were setting it there), who tends to be quiet and dependable and good at taking orders. The other one is the flamboyant and dramatic storm sorcerer/cleric of Procan. He tends to be the party face and leader.
 

Ulfgeir

Explorer
It does happen, but even though we are a large group 7 players + dm, it does not happen that often. Usually we do talk about wat we are going for beforehand. But it does depend on what game we play.
 

Salthorae

Imperial Mountain Dew Taster
Generally, haven't had to deal with it because concepts are discussed in a session 0 and overlap is usually handled there in some "story" way if both are insistent on it.

If it's mechanically cloned (i.e. same class/skills/etc) it's usually fine... so long as the personality isn't also a clone. If the personalities are cloned, then it's hard because then you're splitting the spotlight when it's time for "big dumb fighter social faux pax" or "seductive bard/sorcerer to do their thing and gather information", etc.

If it's an AL table somewhere, I'd try to talk to the player to see what can be done to differentiate the characters and I'd ask the DM to allow for some rebuilds on background or skills or something to differentiate once that talk has happened.

You could do that at any table I guess.
 

aramis erak

Explorer
Have you guys ever been in this situation? You roll up a character with a fairly standard archetype -- big dumb guy with greatsword; snarky necromancer; etc. -- only to find that another player is horning in on the same conceptual space. Is this a "stop copying me" problem, or do you feel like there's enough room in the campaign for similar character types? And if the players in questions do feel like, "I called shotgun on seductive bard," how did you resolve it?

Comic for illustrative purposes.
While I have never had it happen, I've seen it happen in games Iv'e run. In many games, it's not a problem, as they will typically grow apart in game.

The Big Dumb Fighter in D&D is not even a problem unless the players choose to make it one - D&D the personality of fighter generally is irrelevant to mechanics, unless it's cowardly or equivalent.
 

GrahamWills

Adventurer
Session Zero has always solved this for me. Occasionally people come with a similar idea, but if it's clear that two players are going to overlap in spotlight time, it's pretty obvious and people talk it out and come up with new ideas.
 

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
Wouldn't bother me. If I'd created a big dumb barbarian and someone else had done the same I'd be all "excellent, we can be the barbarian bros!"
 

Arnwolf666

Adventurer
Ever wonder what it would be like to be a
Wizard in an adventuring party with a
20 intelligence and everyone else has an 8 intelligence.
My point is that with the standard array I see the same attribute distribution being used almost everything for a given class.
 

Salthorae

Imperial Mountain Dew Taster
Ever wonder what it would be like to be a
Wizard in an adventuring party with a
20 intelligence and everyone else has an 8 intelligence.
My point is that with the standard array I see the same attribute distribution being used almost everything for a given class.
Probably not much different being a 20 Int wizard in a party where everyone else has 14 Int, but sure I get your point. Standard Array leads to homogeneity in stats.

How does this point about standard array speak to the OP's question?
 

Legatus_Legionis

< BLAH HA Ha ha >
It is natural, IMO.

How many dumb barbarians are there that hate anything magic (wizard) related?
How many self absorbed wizards are there, that cares only for its personal goals?
How many hack-n-slash fighters are there?

How many elves are there that hate dwarves?
How many dwarves are there that hate elves, goblins, orcs.

Stereotypes are abound in any role playing game.
 

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