D&D General Where do New DMs Go for Help Online?

I think we're seeing a maturation of the web where people are realizing we can't get a free lunch. At least not forever. Kind of like how "Peak TV" has probably peaked and we're likely to see more consolidation of streaming services in the next couple of years.

I don't know what the charge should be, but someone has to pay to keep the lights on.
If you allow access to your API for free, you increase your visibility and expand the 'breadth of usefulness' of your platform i.e. you get new consumers without having to chase them down yourself... the customer bases of the platforms using your API become part of your customer base.

But there are scenarios, like the one I mentioned previously, where the cost in infrastructure to support a certain volume of calls potentially becomes high enough to justify charging for those calls. I don't really seeing that make sense to charge your general user base though... just the high volume consumers.

 

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I think we're seeing a maturation of the web where people are realizing we can't get a free lunch. At least not forever. Kind of like how "Peak TV" has probably peaked and we're likely to see more consolidation of streaming services in the next couple of years.

I don't know what the charge should be, but someone has to pay to keep the lights on.
I bet people would pay money for an ad-free Reddit app, especially one with the features 3pp apps already offer. The problem is finding a price point that works for everyone.
 

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Supporter
I’ve never been a redditor, the environment seemed quite hostile (at least those were the stories back in the day, I also heard it got better).

For me it was the AngryGM who really pulled back the curtain on what a good DM is actually thinking about when running a game. It was a revelation and I devoured every post with gusto. Then he revealed himself to also be an arsehole, so I don’t recommend him as enthusiastically as I once might have (though Kelsey Dionne is a fan I believe so perhaps I’m judging harshly?)

I found Matt Colville to be a bit hyperactive and I guess I‘m a reading learner so I don’t find his teaching stuff to be that helpful though I do enjoy his criticism.

Enworld has been a great resource, I once put together a sticky thread that tried to pull out the best of the 5e posts because there had been so much useful stuff that was getting lost in the hubbub. I believe it’s now become a wiki page but I’m not sure they see much use?

And finally just watching actual plays and playing the game as a player (rather than a DM), really helped illustrate all the things (good and bad) that I’d been reading about.
 



Oofta

Legend
If you allow access to your API for free, you increase your visibility and expand the 'breadth of usefulness' of your platform i.e. you get new consumers without having to chase them down yourself... the customer bases of the platforms using your API become part of your customer base.

But there are scenarios, like the one I mentioned previously, where the cost in infrastructure to support a certain volume of calls potentially becomes high enough to justify charging for those calls. I don't really seeing that make sense to charge your general user base though... just the high volume consumers.

Trying to figure out how much additional revenue you would get because of additional traffic that would not have happened otherwise is incredibly difficult. It's even harder to prove.

I'm not saying the new pricing structure for Reddit API calls is justified, I don't really know. But nothing in this life comes for free. I know I posted this on another thread recent, but I think it's appropriate here.
 

darjr

I crit!
The act was cute for a while, but it's one of those schticks that just doesn't have legs. It gets old after a while. The advice is generally decent even if I don't always agree, but eventually the tone is just grating.
He attacked people that had no idea there was an “act”. Had no idea who he was. And when they didn’t respond well he doubled down.
 



Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
It's such a PR disaster that the subreddits I'm on are back to normal, and 90% of the complaints are towards the subreddits themselves for taking themselves down, and not towards Reddit itself, its CEO, or the upcoming changes. So, basically, not a PR disaster at all.
This isn't a lightswitch being flicked. Elon Musk is killing Twitter, but the site is still technically up. Reddit is going down a similar (albeit less stupid, because nothing can be as stupid as what's happening to Twitter) path. A year from now, people will regard Reddit differently than they did three months ago.
 

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