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Yet another Ghostbusters movie

Shasarak

Villager
Animal House seemed to have started the frat boy type comedies as well. Anything that National Lampoon was doing was deliberately designed to offend, there is a decent show on Netflix about it. Early Bond movies as well where Bond strikes a women are shocking now. The only places you see male on female violence is usually in shows making a point (its not OK), or the female in question is so powerful its considered fine (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, super heros).
I am half way through watching the second season of the Punisher and he has no quams about hitting women. And fair enough, if they want to be part of the military then they are going to get hit that is just equal opportunity.
 

Zardnaar

Adventurer
I am half way through watching the second season of the Punisher and he has no quams about hitting women. And fair enough, if they want to be part of the military then they are going to get hit that is just equal opportunity.
Yeah I think context is key there. If she is a badass/superhero etc its fine. Bond smacked a normal women across the mouth though in one of the earlier movies. You don't really see domestic abuse like that in very many things and if you do its usually portrayed as unacceptable. Bond just casually does it. Domestic abuse used to be a big problem here (still is but but not like the old days listening to the older generations). Never used to be illegal for example.
 

Shasarak

Villager
Yeah I think context is key there. If she is a badass/superhero etc its fine. Bond smacked a normal women across the mouth though in one of the earlier movies. You don't really see domestic abuse like that in very many things and if you do its usually portrayed as unacceptable. Bond just casually does it. Domestic abuse used to be a big problem here (still is but but not like the old days listening to the older generations). Never used to be illegal for example.
If context is key then what the heck is a normal person doing wandering around the secret moon/volcano/underground bases that Bond is infiltrating then? You never see Bond beating his wife because she did not cook Uncle Billy some eggs, do you?
 

Zardnaar

Adventurer
If context is key then what the heck is a normal person doing wandering around the secret moon/volcano/underground bases that Bond is infiltrating then? You never see Bond beating his wife because she did not cook Uncle Billy some eggs, do you?
Bond only had a wife in one movie. Once Were Warriors was a social commentary movie and at the time was shocking and hard to watch. I remember watching it in the theatre.

Bond back hands a women casually for talking back iirc. He didn't beat the crap out of her like Jake. I was raised by mother and sister. Hitting women was a big no no although seeing a female badass like Ripely fight in Aliens was great.

I did have to ring 111 once because of a couple beaten with rake handle so seeing Bond do that in the 90's in a 60's movie was shocking for me.
 
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Shasarak

Villager
Bond only had a wife in one movie. Once Were Warriors was a social commentary movie and at the time was shocking and hard to watch. I remember watching it in the theatre.

Bond back hands a women casually for talking back iirc. He didn't beat the crap out of her like Jake. I was raised by mother and sister. Hitting women was a big no no although seeing a female badass like Ripely fight in Aliens was great.

I did have to ring 111 once because of a couple beaten with rake handle so seeing Bond do that in the 90's in a 60's movie was shocking for me.
Maybe you were shocked because you imagined that Bond is a good guy with a license to gently massage people?
 

Legatus_Legionis

< BLAH HA Ha ha >
I always wanted to have a sequel to the original Ghostbusters movies.

While "The Real Ghostbusters" cartoon continued the stories (and some of the episodes were very good too), a live action film sequel is always the best.

The cartoon did deal with what it was like inside the containment machine, IIRC.

It would be very interesting what they can add to the ghostbuster's mythos.
 

Zardnaar

Adventurer
Maybe you were shocked because you imagined that Bond is a good guy with a license to gently massage people?
No it's because striking women was a big no no. The families it did happen in was kind of an open secret. Went home last year and found out a few other things as well as some of those kids now adults had been guests of her majesty for domestic violence or sexual assault on there own children.

We weren't allowed to go to certain houses as children now I know why.

Some things were not technically illegal until the mid 80's here. You could still get the cane and strap at school until 1986 here. My friend's mother put it best that unless your father or brother could beat up your husband women could have it fairly rough in some families.

So yeah some of those movies that were offensive were still better than what could happen at home. I doubt it was any better in the US or UK.
 
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Zardnaar

Adventurer
Your dreaming, the cane did not stop in 1986.
That was when it was made illegal IIRC. At my school a teacher was fired in 1992 for using it. Said school you could still get the bash for being gay into the 90's as well.

This was only 1 generation ago now, the world has changed for the better. One of the jokes about Once Were Warriors at the time was "is this a movie or documentary". I saw the after effects of one such bashing Once Were Warriors style in 1996 when I was 17 was the last time I saw something like that (and I had to ring 111, rake handle was used on a couple).
 

trappedslider

Explorer
I always wanted to have a sequel to the original Ghostbusters movies.

While "The Real Ghostbusters" cartoon continued the stories (and some of the episodes were very good too), a live action film sequel is always the best.

The cartoon did deal with what it was like inside the containment machine, IIRC.

It would be very interesting what they can add to the ghostbuster's mythos.
For the most part until this movie comes along The Ghostbuster's video game is/was considered the third movie in conjunction with 1 and 2.
 

Tonguez

Adventurer
I've always wondered why people focus this criticism on the 80's

maybe its a British thing but does anyone remember the Carry On movies? starting in 1958 with Carry On Nurse and ranging right up to 1992 - they're all bowdlerized tiddy comedies and if anything exemplified rape culture its them

While it doesnt justify 'rape culture' in anyway, if you go back far enough then Chaucer and before him Aristophanes were also creating plays and works full of sexual innuendo and :tiddys too
 

Zardnaar

Adventurer
I've always wondered why people focus this criticism on the 80's

maybe its a British thing but does anyone remember the Carry On movies? starting in 1958 with Carry On Nurse and ranging right up to 1992 - they're all bowdlerized tiddy comedies and if anything exemplified rape culture its them

While it doesnt justify 'rape culture' in anyway, if you go back far enough then Chaucer and before him Aristophanes were also creating plays and works full of sexual innuendo and :tiddys too
80's kids were the first to use the internet en masse and the 80s were when things like blockbusters bbwcame big. Basically after Jaws and Star Wars in the 70s. Home computers as well.

80s was also video games becoming mainstream. It's the foundation of modern pop culture. My older brother and sister for example are not gamers I got an Atari 83 or so.
 

Imaculata

Explorer
I always wanted to have a sequel to the original Ghostbusters movies.

While "The Real Ghostbusters" cartoon continued the stories (and some of the episodes were very good too), a live action film sequel is always the best.

The cartoon did deal with what it was like inside the containment machine, IIRC.

It would be very interesting what they can add to the ghostbuster's mythos.
I want to see future movies build more on the mythos, and create mythos their own. But that would take talented writers and a minimum of effort.
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
You absolutely make a point. Heck, The Honeymooners had the threat of domestic violence as one of their recurring jokes.

I think the reason the 80s get singled out is that it was right when the idea that this isn’t okay was starting to finally hit mainstream culture, so you had both the past and the future existing uneasily together.

I've always wondered why people focus this criticism on the 80's

maybe its a British thing but does anyone remember the Carry On movies? starting in 1958 with Carry On Nurse and ranging right up to 1992 - they're all bowdlerized tiddy comedies and if anything exemplified rape culture its them

While it doesnt justify 'rape culture' in anyway, if you go back far enough then Chaucer and before him Aristophanes were also creating plays and works full of sexual innuendo and :tiddys too
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
You absolutely make a point. Heck, The Honeymooners had the threat of domestic violence as one of their recurring jokes.

I think the reason the 80s get singled out is that it was right when the idea that this isn’t okay was starting to finally hit mainstream culture, so you had both the past and the future existing uneasily together.
I'm going to go in a slightly different direction.

I don't think the 80s get singled out, per se.

Instead, I think that we're just seeing a confluence of factors. Specifically-

A. Change in production codes. I know that this may seem obvious, but in terms of what was even allowed on screen, there is a vast difference between the "Hays" code (pre-1968) and the MPAA ratings system that followed it; see also, New Hollywood v. Classic Hollywood. So you had an explosion of serious topics in the late 60s and 70s ... many of which tackled the topics at hand. What was interesting about the 80s, imo, is that the movies ostensibly, for the most part, stopped tackling the major issues in terms of intentions, but we are left with the reflections of what society was like in the movies.

B. This unintentional reflection is everywhere in culture; I was just thinking about the song In the Summertime, by Mungo Jerry- did you realize that the chorus of the song is, quite literally, "Have a drink, have a drive"? Or how about, "If her daddy's rich take her out for a meal, If her daddy's poor just do what you feel"? Um .... 1970, everybody! Feel good song of the summer! ;)

C. I think that what can rankle changes with time. I mean, Amos and Andy? Things from earlier parts of American history often contain weird bits about race. And we can acknowledge that. And opinions about domestic violence* and drunk driving, among other things, have changed.

D. But the early 1980s, and the movies and television, often unintentionally, reflected something uncomfortable about gender dynamics at the time. I think that we are just now coming to terms with that. Because these movies were often written, directed, produced, and approved by men who were, themselves, products of that (and earlier) times.

E. The reason that they are getting attention is because these ( h/t @Zardnaar ) are often the foundations to a lot of "nerd culture" and the people who grew up consuming it are now in charge of making and approving culture today, not to mention that a lot of people are discussing it, and some people feel protective about it.

F. That protective issue is hard to grapple with. A lot of people feel personally invested in this, as if pointing out that there are ... well, issues with things in childhood somehow means that they, themselves, have the same issues. Which isn't the case!


Eh, too much. I like that young Reitman. I hope he makes a good Ghostbusters. :)




*How about the song, "He Hit Me (It Felt Like a Kiss)"? Phil Spector, of course.
 
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Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
E. The reason that they are getting attention is because these ( h/t @Zardnaar ) are often the foundations to a lot of "nerd culture" and the people who grew up consuming it are now in charge of making and approving culture today, not to mention that a lot of people are discussing it, and some people feel protective about it.

F. That protective issue is hard to grapple with. A lot of people feel personally invested in this, as if pointing out that there are ... well, issues with things in childhood somehow means that they, themselves, have the same issues. Which isn't the case!
The 80s were formative culture for people who are now coming into middle age, and most of nerd culture. And this board is loaded with? Nerds coming into being middle aged. Go figure the issues of the 80s would be highlighted.

In addition, in this particular case, the original movie had issues, and some responses to the 2016 movie... failed to show how well we'd improved on those issues over the intervening decades.
 

Imaculata

Explorer
the original movie had issues, and some responses to the 2016 movie... failed to show how well we'd improved on those issues over the intervening decades.
I don't think that is as important as the movie just being a good follow up the original Ghostbusters movies... which it wasn't. I also don't think these sorts of issues should be (ab)used to deflect genuine criticism of the movie.
 

Eltab

Villager
to deflect genuine criticism of the movie.
In the original thread on the most recent GB movie, I predicted it would not be as good as the original, based on the cast working together before (or not).
My comment disappeared without a trace or reply.
 

oni no won

Villager
I did not bother watching the all female version of ghostbusters because it just felt like they were just banking on the trend of switching gender and/or race. I heard it sucked. However, I like that this upcoming movie is a next generation thing where the things that happened in the 80's movie version had come to pass in this upcoming iteration.
 

Eltab

Villager
I like that this upcoming movie is a next generation thing where the things that happened in the 80's movie version had come to pass in this upcoming iteration.
One possible opening hook is that Sigorney Weaver's child (daughter? I forget) has "ghost radar", knows that spooks were empowered during her conception … and has no idea what to do - or how to feel - about the fact that she is therefore 'special'. As the camera begins showing events, a spook oozes out of the wall and looks around her apartment's living room.

The early part of the movie is her trying to find Mom - and then the original Ghostbusters - to get answers. Somebody (Dan Ackroyd?) gives her now-sadly-departed Egon's equipment and a thick sheaf of notes, and 'commissions' her in the business.
 

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