Your Favorite 5e Houserule

dave2008

Legend
Single encounter big bad guys
Add 1 feat/ASI per 4 CR (save the first four)
Add 1 legendary action per PC above 4.
Multiply HP by 1 +0.25 per PC above 4.
Add 1.5 AC (round up) per PC above 4.
Yes, this is the type of information the DMG could/should have contained. How to modify single monsters for over sized parties. It would be great if it also had information about modifying monsters or encounter guidelines for OP groups as well. Regardless, I think @CapnZapp would approve.
 
That sounds very interesting, care to share?
The base of the system is cribbed form this Angry GM post. What I'm layering on to is a way to track favors in influence with individuals and factions. This is tied to downtime activities. In the DMG there are some basic rules for finding things and gaining favors as downtime activities, but they're bland and not well-tied to normal encounter level play,

What I want is some rules that will tie influence and reputation more directly to actual 3rd pillar play, specifically to give the PCs some handholds to plan 3rd pillar stuff. For example, if the PC knows they call in a favor from NPC x, and they know they have the reputation to to get past the guards in place Y, they have some actual resources with which to make a plan of action. Along the same lines, if the players know they need reputation X with faction Y to gain access to the Duke of Chutney, they have concrete ways to go out and make that happen. It sounds mechanical, but in practice there aren't many moving parts and it's easy to work into table talk without breaking character. I'm also working up some rules for an encounter type in between down time and full encounter to represent smaller jobs (if you think of it in terms of, say, Oceans 11 these are montage scenes). There's a book on DMs Guild that ports some rules from Blades in the Dark to 5e for just this purpose that I'm probably just going to adopt wholesale.

The other goal is to decouple skills from stats to an extent, and also make some provisions for non-skill monkey classes that will give them at least a limited ability to bring something to the table in social and non-combat play.
 

Laurefindel

Adventurer
The base of the system is cribbed form this Angry GM post. What I'm layering on to is a way to track favors in influence with individuals and factions. This is tied to downtime activities. In the DMG there are some basic rules for finding things and gaining favors as downtime activities, but they're bland and not well-tied to normal encounter level play (...)
Please share when you feel your WiP has more W than P.
 

dave2008

Legend
The base of the system is cribbed form this Angry GM post. What I'm layering on to is a way to track favors in influence with individuals and factions. This is tied to downtime activities. In the DMG there are some basic rules for finding things and gaining favors as downtime activities, but they're bland and not well-tied to normal encounter level play,

What I want is some rules that will tie influence and reputation more directly to actual 3rd pillar play, specifically to give the PCs some handholds to plan 3rd pillar stuff. For example, if the PC knows they call in a favor from NPC x, and they know they have the reputation to to get past the guards in place Y, they have some actual resources with which to make a plan of action. Along the same lines, if the players know they need reputation X with faction Y to gain access to the Duke of Chutney, they have concrete ways to go out and make that happen. It sounds mechanical, but in practice there aren't many moving parts and it's easy to work into table talk without breaking character. I'm also working up some rules for an encounter type in between down time and full encounter to represent smaller jobs (if you think of it in terms of, say, Oceans 11 these are montage scenes). There's a book on DMs Guild that ports some rules from Blades in the Dark to 5e for just this purpose that I'm probably just going to adopt wholesale.

The other goal is to decouple skills from stats to an extent, and also make some provisions for non-skill monkey classes that will give them at least a limited ability to bring something to the table in social and non-combat play.
Thank you for sharing, I will checkout Angry's post. Would love to see what you finally come up with as well - good luck!
 

Helldritch

Adventurer
Yes, this is the type of information the DMG could/should have contained. How to modify single monsters for over sized parties. It would be great if it also had information about modifying monsters or encounter guidelines for OP groups as well. Regardless, I think @CapnZapp would approve.
I have been using it from almost the beginning of 5ed. It works quite well. Large parties are notoriously hard to manage. Some fights are set to hard and turn up to be easy and other fights that were supposed to be hard turn up almost deadly. Managing multiple opponents in 5ed is relatively hard. That is why I dropped the flanking rule (I know it's optionnal) almost immediately. Monsters benefit way too much from that rule.

The main problem with oversize party comes from the number of enemies. I'm still working a bit on it but as a rule of thumb the PCs seems to be able to manage about half their level in CR without too much trouble (that is for each characters). At the same time, other factors gets in. Are the enemies blessed? Hasted? Many factors complicate things but so far this seems to work out most of the times. If the CR of the creatures is over half the level of the PCs I might go for a 3 monsters for two PCs. Up to one for one if the CR is almost equivalent to their levels. A higher CR ratio means less monsters up to one monster vs the whole party.

One example I often gives is Strahd. In many other groups that I have met, they simply went to Strahd and rolled over him as if he was nothing. In my two groups, the players were terrorized and although both group succeeded in defeating Strahd, their victories were not easy ones. About half of both groups were killed or disabled.
 

CapnZapp

Hero
I was summoned, but really, the "WotC should have" train has gone.

The harsh reality is that WotC simply abandoned any responsibility for their "optional" PHB rules (playing with feats, magic items etc), a decision that they should never have gotten away with, but clearly has.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
We have stopped using inspiration as I, the DM, kept forgetting about it. However I might steal the idea of the players giving inspiration instead.
I found that it helps (when using phb inspiration) to think of inspiration as a bonus on the check that inspires you to give it out. Ie, oh that’s a very cool/in character/inspired thing to try, you have inspiration. And they can use it on that roll, or they can take their chances and save it for later.
Also, let players give their inspiration to each other.
also also, watch the recent Aquisitions Inc games with Crawford as DM.
Does this also apply to things like Hunter's Mark, Sneak Attack, and Divine Smite? Or just the base weapon dice?
All damage dice that a crit would normally cause you to roll twice. It’s the same damage maximum, with a higher minimum and thus average.
The base of the system is cribbed form this Angry GM post. What I'm layering on to is a way to track favors in influence with individuals and factions. This is tied to downtime activities. In the DMG there are some basic rules for finding things and gaining favors as downtime activities, but they're bland and not well-tied to normal encounter level play,

What I want is some rules that will tie influence and reputation more directly to actual 3rd pillar play, specifically to give the PCs some handholds to plan 3rd pillar stuff. For example, if the PC knows they call in a favor from NPC x, and they know they have the reputation to to get past the guards in place Y, they have some actual resources with which to make a plan of action. Along the same lines, if the players know they need reputation X with faction Y to gain access to the Duke of Chutney, they have concrete ways to go out and make that happen. It sounds mechanical, but in practice there aren't many moving parts and it's easy to work into table talk without breaking character. I'm also working up some rules for an encounter type in between down time and full encounter to represent smaller jobs (if you think of it in terms of, say, Oceans 11 these are montage scenes). There's a book on DMs Guild that ports some rules from Blades in the Dark to 5e for just this purpose that I'm probably just going to adopt wholesale.

The other goal is to decouple skills from stats to an extent, and also make some provisions for non-skill monkey classes that will give them at least a limited ability to bring something to the table in social and non-combat play.
Man I think you would really like my TTRPG WIP...

although, the base of our system for favor/rep is that you can earn, owe, and call in, favors as essentially treasure, and build relations with Contacts over time, including spending downtime to strengthen relationships, gaining contacts who can provide favors pro bono every so often, as long as you use them sparingly (ie, 1 time between extended rests/downtime), and don’t betray them of blow them off when they need you in turn.
 
Man I think you would really like my TTRPG WIP...

although, the base of our system for favor/rep is that you can earn, owe, and call in, favors as essentially treasure, and build relations with Contacts over time, including spending downtime to strengthen relationships, gaining contacts who can provide favors pro bono every so often, as long as you use them sparingly (ie, 1 time between extended rests/downtime), and don’t betray them of blow them off when they need you in turn.
You just described my system perfectly, so yeah, I probably would like yours quite a bit,:cool:
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
You just described my system perfectly, so yeah, I probably would like yours quite a bit,:cool:
If you’re interested, I’ll share the OneNote with you so you can check out what we have so far. We are in the middle of the alpha 2.0 version of the game right now.
 

miggyG777

Explorer
Yes, this is the type of information the DMG could/should have contained. How to modify single monsters for over sized parties. It would be great if it also had information about modifying monsters or encounter guidelines for OP groups as well. Regardless, I think @CapnZapp would approve.
I have been using it from almost the beginning of 5ed. It works quite well. Large parties are notoriously hard to manage. Some fights are set to hard and turn up to be easy and other fights that were supposed to be hard turn up almost deadly. Managing multiple opponents in 5ed is relatively hard. That is why I dropped the flanking rule (I know it's optionnal) almost immediately. Monsters benefit way too much from that rule.

The main problem with oversize party comes from the number of enemies. I'm still working a bit on it but as a rule of thumb the PCs seems to be able to manage about half their level in CR without too much trouble (that is for each characters). At the same time, other factors gets in. Are the enemies blessed? Hasted? Many factors complicate things but so far this seems to work out most of the times. If the CR of the creatures is over half the level of the PCs I might go for a 3 monsters for two PCs. Up to one for one if the CR is almost equivalent to their levels. A higher CR ratio means less monsters up to one monster vs the whole party.

One example I often gives is Strahd. In many other groups that I have met, they simply went to Strahd and rolled over him as if he was nothing. In my two groups, the players were terrorized and although both group succeeded in defeating Strahd, their victories were not easy ones. About half of both groups were killed or disabled.
You guys might be interested in this



Explanation is found here: How to F$%& CR: A Practical Example of Monster Building the Angry Way

(c) by AngryGM
 

Jediking

Explorer
Spellcasting Ability Score variant: At character creation OR multiclassing, spellcasters (except wizards, INT only) can pick one of two spellcasting ability scores to cast from (ex. Sorcs can pick CHA or CON; Clerics and Paladins can pick CHA or WIS, Bards and Warlocks can pick CHA or INT). This just opens up different character concepts players may wish to play.

Point Buy with Feats: Characters are created with 27 point buy. A player can pay 4 points to start with a feat.

Flanking: a creature gets +1 to their attacks for each adjacent ally to a hostile creature. If a creature (up to size Large) is surrounded on 4 sides, each attacking creatures gets advantage.
If creatures are back-to-back with an ally, or put their back to a wall/object, they cannot be flanked or surrounded. Gives a little more tactical movement to melee combats and encourages moving around, while keeping the attack bonuses within BA.
 

Coroc

Hero
I was summoned, but really, the "WotC should have" train has gone.

The harsh reality is that WotC simply abandoned any responsibility for their "optional" PHB rules (playing with feats, magic items etc), a decision that they should never have gotten away with, but clearly has.
Btw did anyone ever use (any edition): some mage conjurer bloke casts summon monster XY amd the party gets teleported to him?
 

Weiley31

Adventurer
-Ranger players (or any character with an animal companions/familiars) are allowed to use either the Revised Ranger's beast mechanics or the UA Primal Beasts mechanics for animal companions/familiars.
*Update:*if you need for Animal Companions/Familiars to feel different, then use Revised Ranger beast mechanics for combat pets, and UA Primal Beasts mechanics for Familiars.
 

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