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D&D 6E 6E When?

Zardnaar

Legend
Encounters was a good learning environment. Simple, short, linear adventures, 1 encounter/1-hr session, open entry/exit, fairly low-pressure. New players would graduate to DMing adventures like that very quickly.

AL adventures are more varied, some short, some linear, some sandbox, which is nicer from another PoV.
But I'm not so sure about the focus on AP. Maybe it's a good moneymaker, but shorter modules would seem better for early-DM experiences. I think one reason LMoP gets so much love is that it is fairly short.

It's easier to write a quality shorter adventure IMHO. It's also hard to get people to care about the end vs meeting a short term goal.

They tried AL here didn't work. DMs didn't go for it.
 

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They tried AL here didn't work. DMs didn't go for it.
That's too bad. Still seems to be going strong here - just speaking for the one FLGS, not all CA or USA. ;) Though, I'm not keeping careful tabs on what's happening at other tables, and I was out for a year, and don't actually recognize a lot of the same regulars.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
That's too bad. Still seems to be going strong here - just speaking for the one FLGS, not all CA or USA. ;) Though, I'm not keeping careful tabs on what's happening at other tables, and I was out for a year, and don't actually recognize a lot of the same regulars.

D&D us going well.

The DMs didn't like the drop in drop out nature of it apparently and the rules.

They want to run their own games with the right people. That's what I was told anyway.
 





qstor

Adventurer
I agree with other posters who have mentioned WotC's new strategy.

I don't honestly think WotC will ever, as long as they keep drawing in new players, remove 5e from the market.

I think at some point Hasbro will want a new edition. They won't want to keep reprinting the 5e PHB.
 

ART!

Adventurer
I'm sure it's been said, but the impressive success of 5E means that if a 6E happens any time soon, it will really be 5.5E, meaning completely compatible with 5E, but with whatever changes that they hope make the game even more popular.
 

And I say Hasbro should publish a "Endless Quest"* board game with easy rules for +7 years children (a free pdf for an advanced system) as hook for new fans, with coins to buy new item. I didn't like the 2002 version because there weren't coins to be collected and there was a limit for the number of weapons. When you find one you had to discard other to keep the new one. And without XPs with automatic leveling up as the "milestones" house rule. Other option is an app for mobile or tablet to the the IA in single-player games (showing when the PCs falls in a hidden trap or is surprised by ambushes)


Hasbro wants a D&D in the every families' houses and after it will dare to risk with some changes. I have said to try new ideas, for example a different list of abilities scores, one of the sacred cows, better to publish a d20 Modern 2.0. or an Universal d20 (to play G.I.Joe & autobots against the inhumanoids). Maybe we see a Gamma World videogame with hope to be so popular as Fallout saga.

* (Hero Quest is now trademark by other publisher but "Endless Quest", the name of the game-books, can be used by Hasbro).
 

So, for everyone (including me) focusing on the current success of 5e as a reason we won't see a new ed, it's interesting to reflect that, at the height of D&D's fad-years popularity, there were 3 editions in print, /concurrently/, and TSR essentially, though with no fanfare, rolled rev on Basic D&D a couple times.

The strategy is different now, it might be WotC will, in even greater contrast to the fad years, decline to roll to a 6e even /after/ 5e plateaus or falls off.
The rev-roll-to-goose-sales strategy was born of a time when the pool of players was small, dedicated and relatively stable. Now that it's larger and more casual, a different strategy may be called for in the face of a drop off in sales.
 


Parmandur

Legend
So, for everyone (including me) focusing on the current success of 5e as a reason we won't see a new ed, it's interesting to reflect that, at the height of D&D's fad-years popularity, there were 3 editions in print, /concurrently/, and TSR essentially, though with no fanfare, rolled rev on Basic D&D a couple times.

The strategy is different now, it might be WotC will, in even greater contrast to the fad years, decline to roll to a 6e even /after/ 5e plateaus or falls off.
The rev-roll-to-goose-sales strategy was born of a time when the pool of players was small, dedicated and relatively stable. Now that it's larger and more casual, a different strategy may be called for in the face of a drop off in sales.

"Past results are not indicative of future performance," as they say. The TTRPG industry is so young, as industry goes, that definitive pattern recognition is unlikely.
 


darjr

I crit!
Hmmm to that point they do employ game designers. They want to design. But I don’t think Hasbro or WotC would want to redo or iterate a version just because. And I dint think WotC would get tired of publishing a bestseller.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
Hmmm to that point they do employ game designers. They want to design. But I don’t think Hasbro or WotC would want to redo or iterate a version just because. And I dint think WotC would get tired of publishing a bestseller.

Which is part of the reason their core staff is kept relatively small. The initial cost of developing the PHB has long since been recouped, why would they make that investment again until they absolutely have to do so?

Add in a subscription model for tools like DndBeyond and you have a steady cash stream for the foreseeable future.
 





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