Homebrew A Leveled Up Bestiary

Faolyn

(she/her)
I almost thought I wasn't going to be able to post today--my internet company was updating and so I was offline except for my phone. "We're starting at 6 am! You'll be off for just two hours, with intermittent shortages!" Hah, yeah.

The last two elementals (for now…), these are the dust elemental and salt elemental. A dust elemental is one likely to arise naturally in a place that has been abandoned for a very long time or in a place where there has been a terrible natural disaster, and it would make a good minion for a necromancer (actually, so would an ash elemental—ashes to ashes, dust to dust, so to speak). And a salt elemental would likely appear naturally in salt flats, and may be the servitors of a yellow dragon.

Quasi-Elementals
Plane Speaking, Dragon Magazine #128
Created by Jeff Grub

Quasi-elementals spring into being from the mixed magical energies of the various elemental planes and the Plane of Death.

Dust Elemental
The earthen counterpart of the ash elemental, the dust element represents the destruction of matter. They are maliciously destructive, rejoicing in taking objects apart and grinding them into nothing. They rejoice in coming to the Material World, as there is so much more to destroy. Perhaps surprisingly, they have a particular loathing for slavers, and like to give such people a taste of their own medicine. It’s said that this is in retaliation for past mistreatment at the hands of others, but nobody knows who exactly had enslaved these elementals before.

Dust Elemental Signs
1-2. Everything in the area is covered in dust and cobwebs; peoples’ dust allergies begin acting up.
3. The lighting seems filmy and gray.
4. Objects begin to break down, no matter hold well-constructed they are.

Dust Elemental Behavior
1. Pulverizing an item for fun.
2. Hostile; will attack on sight.
3. Hunting a known slaver.
4. Resting as a pile of dust.

Dust Elemental Appearance
1. A billowing cloud of dust motes, with brighter motes for eyes.
2. A large sheet of gray cobwebs.
3. A humanoid figure covered in dusty shrouds and wrappings.
4. A hulking, short-tailed quadruped with long horn-like ears and glowing white eyes.

Dust Elemental
Large elemental

Challenge 5 (1,800 XP)
AC 16 (natural armor)
HP 102 (12d10+36; bloodied 51)
Speed 30 ft., fly 30 ft.

STR 16 (+3) DEX 14 (+2) CON 16 (+3)
INT X (+0) WIS X (+0) CHA X (+0)

Proficiency +3
Maneuver DC 14
Damage Vulnerabilities fire
Damage Resistances necrotic; damage from nonmagical weapons
Damage Immunities cold, poison
Condition Immunities fatigue, grappled, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, prone, restrained, stunned, unconscious
Senses darkvision 60 ft., passive Perception 10
Languages Terran
Amorphous. The elemental can move through a space as narrow as 1 inch wide without squeezing.
Dust Storm. The elemental can use its action to transform into a cloud of dust that fits into a twenty foot radius sphere, or back into its true form. While in this form, it can’t take any actions, but its speed is 60 feet, it gains a fly speed of 60 feet, and its area is heavily obscured difficult terrain. A creature that ends its turn inside the elemental takes 5 (1d10) necrotic damage and can’t benefit from being invisible.
Negative Sight. The elemental’s darkness penetrates magical darkness.

Actions
Multiattack.
The elemental makes two pseudopod attacks.
Pseudopod. Melee Weapon Attack: +6, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 12 (2d8+3) bludgeoning damage.
Engulf. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, Reach 5 ft., one Large or smaller creature. Hit: 14 (4d6) necrotic damage, and the target is grappled by the elemental (escape DC 14). While grappled, the creature is blinded, can’t breathe, and takes 14 (4d6) ongoing necrotic damage. If the elemental takes damage while grappling a creature in this manner, then it takes half the damage (rounded down) and the other half is dealt to the creature inside. If the elemental takes fire damage, then both it and the grappled creature take full damage.

Combat
Dust elementals like to engulf a target, and then lash out at others with its pseudopods. It will willingly allow themselves to be damaged if it means that the creature it is grappling will be harmed as well.

Variant: Giant Dust Elemental
A giant dust elemental is CR 9 (5,000 XP), and is Huge. It has 142 (15d12+45; bloodied 71) hit points. Its Pseudopod and Engulf attacks inflict an additional 10 (3d6) damage.

*

Salt Elemental
Salt elementals are clumsy, delicate entities that live a precarious existence: they must feed on moisture but too much water causes them to dissolve within moments. They are the result of the interaction of the Plane of Water and Plane of Death, but they are rarely found on either plane. Instead, they most often dwell in the Plane of Earth, or on salt flats of other planes.

Salt Elemental Signs
1. The smell of the ocean.
2. All liquids in the area are contaminated by salt.
3. Everyone is incredibly thirsty.
4. Plants in the area are drying and buildings begin crumbling away.

Salt Elemental Behavior
1. Assisting (willingly or not) a scholar or wizard in keeping their books dry.
2. On the run from a water elemental.
3. Hungry; will attack on sight.
4. Trying to suck the moisture out of every plant around it.

Salt Elemental Appearance
1. A rime-encrusted lizard.
2. A floating pillar of salt crystal (hovers just above the ground but doesn’t “fly”, per se).
3. A collection of salt cubes, put together in an asymmetrical form.
3. A young-seeming humanoid figure with salt-white skin and yellow hair.

Salt Elemental
Large elemental

Challenge # (XP)
AC 14 (natural armor)
HP 90 (12d10+24; bloodied 45)
Speed 30 ft.

STR 18 (+4) DEX 9 (-1) CON 14 (+2)
INT 5 (-3) WIS 10 (+0) CHA 5 (-3)

Proficiency +3
Maneuver DC 15
Damage Vulnerabilities acid
Damage Resistances fire; damage from nonmagical weapons
Damage Immunities necrotic, poison
Condition Immunities fatigue, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, stunned, unconscious
Senses darkvision 60 ft., passive Perception 10
Languages Aquan
Desiccating Body. A creature that touches the elemental or hits it with a melee attack while within 5 feet of it takes 5 (1d10) necrotic damage.
Negative Sight. The elemental’s darkness penetrates magical darkness.
Water Susceptibility. For every 5 feet the elemental moves in water, or for every gallon of water splashed on it, the elemental takes 5 (1d10) acid damage. If the elemental is reduced to 0 hit points because of this damage, it explodes. Each creature within 30 feet of the elemental when this happens must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw, taking 9 (2d8) piercing damage on a failed save, or half as much on a successful one.

Actions
Multiattack.
The elemental makes two slam attacks.
Slam. Melee Weapon Attack: +6, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 13 (2d8+4) bludgeoning damage plus 4 (1d8) necrotic damage, and the elemental regains hit points equal to half the amount of necrotic damage taken.
Draining Touch (Recharge 4-6). The elemental touches a creature it can see within 5 feet of it, and that creature must make a DC 12 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, the creature takes 1 level of fatigue. This fatigue remains until the creature drinks 1 Supply worth of water for each level of fatigue taken.

Combat
A salt elemental will attack artlessly with its Slam and Draining Touch, but will flee if its foes use liquid to attack.

Variant: Giant Salt Elemental
A giant salt elemental is CR 9 (5,000 XP) and is Huge. It has 127 (15d12+30; bloodied 63) hit points. Its slam attack deals an extra 10 (3d6) damage.
 

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Faolyn

(she/her)
The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out… This article is on giant bristle worms, written and with photographs by Kent Colbath, who is very passionately pro-worm and disapproves of everyone's anti-worm bias. He put enormous amounts of detail into this article into the eight different species of bristle worm he statted up. He’s so pro-worm, in fact, that I looked him up. I discovered a scientist and former professor of geology by that name who has worked and taught all over the place, including several prestigious universities and organizations, and who co-wrote a novel called Nereis, Nereis, which is the name of the first bristle worm covered by this article. If this is the same guy, then good for him! He’s come a long way since sending this handful of monster worms to Dragon Magazine back in 1988. So I really hope he doesn’t hate me because I’m going to combine elements into a single giant bristle worm. It’s magic, OK? A wizard did it.

Real bristle worms are actually pretty cool. They’re marine worms (mostly; a few live in freshwater). One species can live in water that is 140° F, another can live without oxygen for 96 hours—and it lives in what’s basically methane ice on the ocean floor. There’s a few species of “zombie worms” that produce acid on their skin to eat bones—whale bones at the bottom of the sea, so don’t worry about them coming after you. Some of them have bioluminescence. The largest is 10 feet long. If I wrote these things up without context, you’d think they should be monstrosities created by magic, not real-world animals. Ain’t nature awesome?

The article amusingly notes that giant bristle worms are rare, in part because titans and demigods use them as bait when they go fishing. I think that’s a cute idea!

1662666980573.png

Photography by Kent Colbath

Giant Bristle Worm
The Dragon’s Bestiary, Dragon Magazine #133
Created by Kent Colbath

Bristle worms are marine invertebrates, common to oceans the world over. Giant bristle worms, however, were magically altered to become truly gigantic—they range from 15 to 20 feet long and 2 to 3 feet in diameter. They have four complex jaws equipped with powerful pincers and four long palps that serve as both sensory organs and prehensile tentacles. They are all but blind but have excellent senses of smell and touch. They are also significantly more intelligent than their tinier cousins. Bristle worms come in a variety of colors, most commonly reds and browns, with bristles that are white or golden in color.

The bristle worm’s bristles are filled with an irritating toxin. Regularly-sized bristle worms are scavengers, and their bristles are a defense mechanism. Giant bristle worms supplement their diets with freshly-hunted meat, however.

Ocean Dwellers. Bristle worms build tube-like homes out of hardened sand and shell, to which they retreat when sleeping or wounded. They decorate these tubes with interesting objects they come across, some of which may by chance be quite valuable.

Legends and Lore
With an Nature check, the characters can learn the following:

DC 10. Giant bristle worms are tremendous versions of normal worms.

DC 15. As their name suggests, these worms are covered in bristles. Not only are these bristles sharp, but they are covered with a very painful toxin.

DC 20. Due to having adapted to live in extreme temperatures, giant bristle worms are resistant to both heat and cold. They also have long, tentacle-like sensory palps that they can use to grab prey from long distances away, and a nasty, venomous bite.

Bristle Worm Encounters
CR 5-10
1-2 giant bristle worms.

Giant Bristle Worm
Large beast

Challenge 5 (1,800 XP)
AC 14 (natural armor)
HP 76 (8d10+32; bloodied 42)
Speed 20 ft., swim 40 ft.

STR 18 (+4) DEX 14 (+2) CON 19 (+4)
INT 2 (-4) WIS 10 (+0) CHA 3 (-4)

Proficiency
+3
Maneuver DC 15
Damage Resistances cold, fire
Condition Immunities blinded, deafened
Senses blindsight 30 ft. (blind beyond this radius), tremorsense 60 ft., passive Perception 10
Languages
Bristles. A creature that grapples the worm takes 3 (1d6) piercing damage plus 3 (1d6) acid damage at the start of the worm’s turn, and must make a DC 14 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, it is overwhelmed with pain and is slowed until the end of its next turn.
Keen Smell. When in water, the worm has advantage in Perception checks that rely on smell.
Limited Amphibiousness. The worm can breathe air and water, but it needs to be submerged in water at least once a day for 1 hour to avoid suffocating.
Tunneler. The worm can tunnel through earth and loose stone, leaving behind a 5-foot-diameter tunnel.

Actions
Bite.
Melee Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (3d6+4) piercing damage, and the target must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw, taking 10 (3d6) poison damage on a failed save or half as much on a successful one. If the poison damage reduces the target to 0 hit points, the target is stable but poisoned for 1 hour, even if it regains hit points, and is paralyzed while poisoned in this way.
Swallow. The worm makes a bite attack against a Medium or creature it is grappling. If the attack hits and the worm has not swallowed another creature, the target is swallowed and the grapple ends. A swallowed creature has total cover from attacks from outside the worm, it is blinded and restrained, and it takes 7 (2d6) acid damage at the beginning of each of the worm’s turns. If the worm dies, the target is no longer swallowed.

Bonus Actions
Tentacles.
Melee Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, reach 20 ft., one target. Hit: The target is grappled (escape DC 15) and pulled up to 20 feet straight towards the worm.

Combat
The bristle worm is an ambush predators. It lashes out with its tentacles and draws creatures to it to bite and swallow.

Bristle Worm Tubes
A bristle worm’s tube is a Large or Huge object with AC 17 and 20 hit points, and is immune to psychic and poison damage. A bristle worm hiding in its tube has total cover, and can use its tentacles to attack.
 

Faolyn

(she/her)
What I’m sure everyone has been waiting for: a new dragon!

According to the Forgotten Realms wiki, the fang dragon is a type of chromatic dragon and is also called a gray dragon. Pfui to that, says I! No, fang dragons are something else entirely. Fang dragons got reprinted in Monstrous Compendium Annual #1 for 2e, and later in Monsters of Faerûn for 3e. Considering the Realmsian bent of 5e, I’m really surprised they weren’t in Fizban’s.

I also saw that essence dragons don’t have Great Wyrms, and neither do gem dragons. I wonder if there’s a deliberate reason for that, or an accidental omission. They also don’t have tail attacks, but I gave one to the fang dragon anyway. It deserves one. After all, it can’t fly and doesn’t have a breath weapon. But don’t worry—it’s still pretty darn nasty.

(Just in case it’s not clear, their claw/claw/bite Multiattack does not include their Soulbite attack. Just its regular bite.)

1662752331937.png

The article only references a single artist--Jim Holloway--but it's unclear if he did every piece for this article, or just the first piece, since it said illustration, singular.

Fang Dragon (Essence Dragon)
The Dragon’s Bestiary, Dragon Magazine #134
Created by Ed Greenwood

Essence dragons embody the land, but sometimes humanoids change the land through their actions. In places where great wars have been fought—not mere skirmishes or simple battles, but the type of wars that last for decades or longer and reshape the politics of an entire continent—fang dragons rule.

Fang dragons has scales that look like metal plates, steely gray and dotted with red-brown rust, and their heads resembles bestial horned helmets, with oversized jaws filled with far too many teeth. Every part of their body is covered in barbed bone spurs and their tails split into two, each of which ends a scythe blades, heralding the death they bring. Their wings are too small for flight, but allow them to make prodigious leaps.

God of War. The land of a fang dragon is often a dreary place, where the threat or actuality of war always hangs over the heads of every citizen. Mud-splattered refugees, mercenaries, soldiers alike crowd the settlements while press-gangs search for likely new candidates for the front lines. Tensions run high and sides are chosen, with little or no trust between the sides, and diplomacy is shunned. And the dragon watches, and approves, and encourages it all. If peace seems to threaten, the dragon will work to break that peace, sending servitors in the guise of one side or another to stage attacks, or to infiltrate one side or the other—or both—as an advisor to the ruler. Fang dragons care nothing about politics; it only loves war.

Some people make offerings to the gods as they pray for victory in war, or respite from it. The dragon greedily takes those offerings. What it can’t use itself, it generously lends to its lieutenants. In some places, the fang dragon itself is seen as a war god, and it revels in that belief.

Legends and Lore
With an Arcana or Nature check, the characters can learn the following:

DC 10. Fang dragons are spiritually linked to places of important battles or incessant warfare. A fang dragon’s lair is usually a very strong fortress with dozens or scores of soldiers within.

DC 15. Although they lack a breath weapon, their bite can permanently drain a person’s health. Fang dragons love magic items and will use any it owns intelligently and to great effect.

DC 20. Despite their bellicose nature, they are able and willing to converse in many languages, and seem to enjoy verbal battles as much as physical ones. They will also never (directly) harm one another—the only note of peace these dragons care about.

Fang Dragon Encounters
Terrain:
hills, mountains, ruins

CR 3-4 fang dragon wyrmling
Treasure: 150 gp, 100 sp, onyx (worth 50 gp), necklace of fireballs.

CR 5-10 fang dragon wyrmling with 1d4 dragonbound warriors, kobolds, or soldiers; young fang dragon.
Treasure: 250 pp, 200 gp, iron crown set with bloodstones (300 gp), rare book on ancient wars (250 gp), brass censor etched with draconic scales (100 gp), iron bands of binding, potion of mind reading, dust of dryness.

CR 11-16 young fang dragon with veteran and 1d4+2 soldiers; young fang dragon with soldier squad.
Treasure: 1,000 gp, 1,200 sp, emerald (1,000 gp), steel scepter engraved with dwarven faces and axeheads (1,000 gp), quiver made from red dragon hide with 10 +1 arrows, luckstone, ring of jumping.

CR 17-22 adult fang dragon; adult fang dragon with blackguard or holy knight; young fang dragon with 2 soldier squads; ancient fang dragon.
Treasure: 750 pp, 8,500 gp, 10,000 sp, 3 sapphires (1,000 gp each), a hostage (young member of the royal family) from a nearby kingdom, 2 elemental gems, manual of gainful exercise, single-edged +2 greatsword named Cleaver of Tyrants with permanently bloodstained blade.

CR 23-30 ancient fang dragon with 2 wights; adult fang dragon with wraith lord or knight captain.
Treasure: 1,500 pp, 10,000 gp, suit of ceremonial gold-etched full plate armor (2,500 gp), gold pendant studded with an enormous diamond (7,500 gp), chess set made from marble, gold, and platinum (5,000 gp), 4 potions of superior healing, ioun stone (absorption), 2 oils of sharpness, rod of rulership.

CR 31+ ancient fang dragon with knight captain and two soldier squads; ancient fang dragon with 2d4+2 wights; adult fang dragon with wraith lord and 3-4 wights
Treasure: 4,000 pp, 18,000 gp, a dozen sapphires (1,000 gp each), perfect ruby the size of a chicken’s egg (10,000 gp), candle of invocation, cubic gate, efreeti bottle, wand of lightning bolts.

Signs
1. A battlefield, littered with fresh corpses.
2. A strangely-shaped, undecorated iron shield without a grip but with a spike for a shield boss; a DC 15 Nature check is required to realize this is a dragon’s scale.
3. Corpses of soldiers, strung up in a way to show humiliation and defeat.
4. The smell of blood in the air.
5. A notice looking for mercenaries.
6. The weather is always dreary and oppressive, like a thunderstorm is on its way.

Behavior
1-2. Enjoying a leisurely hunt alone.
3. Polishing a collection of weapons and armor collected from defeated foes.
4. Along with its warriors, completely destroying a town.
5. Overseeing the construction of a monument to honor a decisive battle.
6. Leading an army from the front into a massive battle.
7. Engaging in a discussion of tactics with its advisors.
8. Raging and demanding tribute.

Fang Dragon Lair Features
The save DC for the following effects is 13 + the dragon’s proficiency modifier. Choose or roll one or more of the following features:
1. The dragon’s lair is in a well-constructed fortress which is heavily patrolled by the dragon’s many soldiers. Journeys to the dragon’s lair trigger twice as many encounters as normal. Additionally, at the beginning of each round of combat, roll a d6. On a 5-4, 1d4 soldiers arrive to defend the dragon. The soldiers fight until killed or until the dragon instructs them to stop.
2. The lair is in the middle of a haunted battlefield. Zombies, skeletons, specters, and warlord’s ghosts roam freely, as do brigands and grave-robbers. Journeys to the dragon’s lair trigger twice as many encounters as normal. Additionally, a mist hangs over the entire land, reducing visibility by half.
3. The rocks and trees branches are particularly sharp. Whenever one of the dragon’s attacks or abilities cause a creature to impact a solid object, increase the damage that creature takes by 9 (2d8).
4. Buzzing, biting, disease-bearing carrion flies are everywhere. The first time a creature takes damage in the lair, and after every hour when not at full hit points, the creature must make a Constitution saving throw or catch sewer plague from the flies (see Diseases in Chapter 7: Maladies in Trials & Treasures).

Names
Agnarcadel the Fierce, Bladeclaw, Bloodshedder, Koamalou Deathbringer, Tumult

Ancient Fang Dragon
Legendary gargantuan dragon

Challenge 22 (41,000 XP)
AC 22 (natural armor)
HP 367 (21d20+147; bloodied 183)
Speed 40 ft., burrow 40 ft.

STR 26 (+8) DEX 10 (+0) CON 24 (+7)
INT 16 (+3) WIS 16 (+3) CHA 18 (+4)

Proficiency +7
Maneuver DC 23
Saving Throws Str +15, Dex +7, Con +14, Int +10, Wis +10, Cha +11
Skills Deception +11, History +10, Perception +10 (+1d6)
Damage Resistances damage from nonmagical weapons
Condition Immunities charmed, fatigue, frightened, strife
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 23
Languages Common, Draconic, three more
Armored Hide. If a creature targets the dragon with a melee attack using a nonmagical weapon and rolls a natural 1 on the attack roll, the weapon breaks. If the creature targets it using a magical weapon and rolls a natural 1, the weapon is damaged and provides no attack or damage bonuses for 1 hour.
Bloodied Frenzy. While the dragon is bloodied, it makes all attacks with advantage and all attacks against them are made with advantage.
Leaper. The dragon can jump up to 40 feet horizontally and 40 feet vertically without a running start.
Legendary Resistance (3/Day). When the dragon fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead. When it does, some of its scales fall off and crumble into dust. If it has no more uses of this ability, its Armor Class is reduced to 20 until it finishes a long rest.
Master of The Battlefield. The dragon gains a d4 expertise die on Intelligence checks made to recall lore about war, arms and armor, and tactics. If it fails such a roll, it can use a Legendary Resistance to treat the roll as a 20.
Mimicry. The dragon can mimic voices and animal sounds. Recognizing the sounds as an imitation requires a DC 19 Insight check.
Spiked. A creature that grapples or is grappled by the dragon takes 11 (2d10) piercing damage at the start of the dragon’s turn.

Actions
Multiattack.
The dragon attacks once with its bite and twice with its claws.
Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 15 ft., one target. Hit: 41 (6d10+8) piercing damage.
Claws. Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 26 (4d8+8) slashing damage. If the dragon scores a critical hit, one piece of the target’s armor is damaged, or broken if it is already damaged.
Tail. Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 20 ft., one target. Hit: 21 (3d8+8) bludgeoning damage plus 13 (3d8) slashing damage, and dragon pushes the target 10 feet away, and the target must make a DC 23 Strength saving throw or be stunned until the end of its next turn.
Soulbite (Recharge 5-6). Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 15 ft., one target. Hit: 41 (6d10+8) piercing damage, and the target must make a DC 22 Constitution saving throw. It takes 66 (12d10) necrotic damage and two levels of fatigue on a failed save, or half as much damage and one level of fatigue on a successful one. The target’s hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to half the necrotic damage taken, and the dragon regains that many hit points. The reduction lasts until the target is subjected to a greater restoration spell. A humanoid reduced to 0 hit points by this attack dies. Its corpse rises as either a wight or a wraith (Narrator’s choice) 1d4 nights later. It pays fealty to the dragon but is not under its direct control.

Reactions
Tail Block.
When a creature attacks the dragon or a target within 20 feet of it, the dragon uses its tail to impose disadvantage on that attack.

Legendary Actions
The dragon can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. It regains spent legendary actions at the start of each of its turns.

Roar. Each creature of the dragon’s choice within 120 feet that can hear it makes a DC 19 Charisma saving throw or be frightened for 1 minute. A creature can make a new saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success. When it succeeds on a saving throw or the effect ends for it, it is immune to the Roar for 24 hours.
Tail Attack. The dragon makes an attack with its tail.
Vaulting Leap (Costs 2 Actions). The dragon leaps up to its speed horizontally and vertically without provoking opportunity attacks and can land in a space containing one or more creatures. Each creature in its space when it lands must make a DC 23 Dexterity saving throw, taking 30 (4d10+8) bludgeoning damage and being knocked prone on a failure. On a success, the creature takes half damage and is pushed 10 feet away.
Conscription (Costs 3 Actions). The dragon targets a corpse within 60 feet of it that can see. That creature rises as a zombie under the dragon’s control.

Variant: Fang Dragon Spellcaster
Some dragons develop the ability to innately cast spells. A fang dragon spellcaster’s spellcasting ability is Charisma. It can innately cast the following spells, requiring no material components. Each age category knows its own spells and those of younger age categories.

Young (save DC X): 3/day each: detect magic, shield
Adult (save DC X): 3/day each: counterspell, spike growth
Ancient (save DC X): 1/day each: globe of invulnerability, telekinesis

Adult Fang Dragon
Legendary huge dragon

Challenge 17 (18,000 XP)
AC 20 (natural armor)
HP 195 (17d12+85; bloodied 97)
Speed 40 ft., burrow 30 ft.

STR 22 (+6) DEX 10 (+0) CON 20 (+5)
INT 14 (+2) WIS 14 (+2) CHA 16 (+3)

Proficiency +6
Maneuver DC 20
Saving Throws Str +12, Dex +6, Con +11, Int +8, Wis +8, Cha +9
Skills Deception +9, History +8, Perception +8 (+1d6)
Damage Resistances damage from nonmagical weapons
Condition Immunities charmed, fatigue, frightened, strife
Senses darkvision 60 ft., passive Perception 21
Languages Common, Draconic, two more
Armored Hide. If a creature targets the dragon with a melee attack using a nonmagical weapon and rolls a natural 1 on the attack roll, the weapon breaks. If the creature targets it using a magical weapon and rolls a natural 1, the weapon is damaged and provides no attack or damage bonuses for 1 hour.
Bloodied Frenzy. While the dragon is bloodied, it makes all attacks with advantage and all attacks against them are made with advantage.
Leaper. The dragon can jump up to 40 feet horizontally and 30 feet vertically without a running start.
Legendary Resistance (3/Day). When the dragon fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead. When it does, some of its scales fall off and crumble into dust. If it has no more uses of this ability, its Armor Class is reduced to 20 until it finishes a long rest.
Master of The Battlefield. The dragon gains a d4 expertise die on Intelligence checks made to recall lore about war, arms and armor, and tactics. If it fails such a roll, it can use a Legendary Resistance to treat the roll as a 20.
Mimicry. The dragon can mimic voices and animal sounds. Recognizing the sounds as an imitation requires a DC 17 Insight check.
Spiked. A creature that grapples or is grappled by the dragon takes 11 (2d10) piercing damage at the start of the dragon’s turn.

Actions
Multiattack.
The dragon attacks once with its bite and twice with its claws.
Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +12 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 33 (5d10+6) piercing damage.
Claws. Melee Weapon Attack: +12 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 19 (3d8+6) slashing damage. If the dragon scores a critical hit, one piece of the target’s armor is damaged, or broken if it is already damaged.
Tail. Melee Weapon Attack: +12 to hit, reach 15 ft., one target. Hit: 15 (2d8+6) bludgeoning damage plus 4 (1d8) slashing damage, and dragon pushes the target 10 feet away, and the target must make a DC 20 Strength saving throw or be stunned until the end of its next turn.
Soulbite (Recharge 5-6). Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 15 ft., one target. Hit: 33 (5d10+6) piercing damage, and the target must make a DC 19 Constitution saving throw. It takes 44 (8d10) necrotic damage and two levels of fatigue on a failed save, or half as much damage and one level of fatigue on a successful one. The target’s hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to half the necrotic damage taken, and the dragon regains that many hit points. The reduction lasts until the target is subjected to a greater restoration spell. A humanoid reduced to 0 hit points by this attack dies. Its corpse rises as either a wight or a wraith (Narrator’s choice) 1d4 nights later. It pays fealty to the dragon but is not under its direct control.

Reactions
Tail Block.
When a creature attacks the dragon or a target within 20 feet of it, the dragon uses its tail to impose disadvantage on that attack.

Legendary Actions
The dragon can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. It regains spent legendary actions at the start of each of its turns.
Roar. Each creature of the dragon’s choice within 120 feet that can hear it makes a DC 17 Charisma saving throw or be frightened for 1 minute. A creature can make a new saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success. When it succeeds on a saving throw or the effect ends for it, it is immune to the Roar for 24 hours.
Tail Attack. The dragon makes an attack with its tail.
Vaulting Leap (Costs 2 Actions). The dragon leaps up to its speed horizontally and vertically without provoking opportunity attacks and can land in a space containing one or more creatures. Each creature in its space when it lands must make a DC 20 Dexterity saving throw, taking 28 (4d10+6) bludgeoning damage and being knocked prone on a failure. On a success, the creature takes half damage and is pushed 10 feet away.
Conscription (Costs 3 Actions). The dragon targets a corpse within 60 feet of it that can see. That creature rises as a zombie under the dragon’s control.

*

Young Fang Dragon
Large dragon

Challenge 10 (5,900 XP)
AC 20 (natural armor)
HP 153 (18d10+54; bloodied 76)
Speed 40 ft., burrow 20 ft.

STR 19 (+4) DEX 10 (+0) CON 17 (+3)
INT 13 (+1) WIS 14 (+2) CHA 14 (+2)

Proficiency +4
Maneuver DC 16
Saving Throws Str +8, Dex +4, Con +7, Int +5, Wis +6, Cha +6
Skills Deception +6, History +6, Perception +6 (+1d6)
Damage Resistances damage from nonmagical weapons
Condition Immunities charmed, fatigue, frightened, strife
Senses darkvision 60 ft., passive Perception 19
Languages Common, Draconic
Bloodied Frenzy. While the dragon is bloodied, it makes all attacks with advantage and all attacks against them are made with advantage.
Leaper. The dragon can jump up to 30 feet horizontally and 20 feet vertically without a running start.
Mimicry. The dragon can mimic voices and animal sounds. Recognizing the sounds as an imitation requires a DC 16 Insight check.
Spiked. A creature that grapples or is grappled by the dragon takes 5 (1d10) piercing damage at the start of the dragon’s turn.

Actions
Multiattack.
The dragon attacks once with its bite and twice with its claws.
Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 26 (4d10+4) piercing damage.
Claws. Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 13 (2d8+4) slashing damage.
Soulbite (Recharge 5-6). Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 15 ft., one target. Hit: 26 (4d10+4) piercing damage, and the target must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. It takes 33 (6d10) necrotic damage and one level of fatigue on a failed save, or half as much damage and takes no fatigue on a successful one. The target’s hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to half the necrotic damage taken, and the dragon regains that many hit points. The reduction lasts until the target is subjected to a greater restoration spell. A humanoid reduced to 0 hit points by this attack dies. Its corpse rises as either a wight or a wraith (Narrator’s choice) 1d4 nights later. It pays fealty to the dragon but is not under its direct control.

Reactions
Tail Block (Recharge 5-6).
When a creature attacks the dragon or a target within 20 feet of it, the dragon uses its tail to impose disadvantage on that attack.

*

Fang Dragon Wyrmling
Medium dragon

Challenge 4 (1,100 XP)
AC 20 (natural armor)
HP 65 (10d8+20; bloodied 32)
Speed 30 ft., burrow 15 ft.

STR 16 (+3) DEX 10 (+0) CON 14 (+2)
INT 11 (+0) WIS 12 (+1) CHA 12 (+1)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 13
Saving Throws Str +5, Dex +2, Con +4, Int +2, Wis +3, Cha +3
Skills Deception +5, Perception +3 (+1d6)
Damage Resistances damage from nonmagical weapons
Condition Immunities charmed, fatigue, frightened, strife
Senses darkvision 60 ft., passive Perception 16
Languages Common, Draconic
Bloodied Frenzy. While the dragon is bloodied, it makes all attacks with advantage and all attacks against them are made with advantage.
Leaper. The dragon can jump up to 20 feet horizontally and 10 feet vertically without a running start.
Mimicry. The dragon can mimic voices and animal sounds. Recognizing the sounds as an imitation requires a DC 16 Insight check.
Spiked. A creature that grapples or is grappled by the dragon takes 3 (1d6) piercing damage at the start of the dragon’s turn.

Actions
Bite.
Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 19 (3d10+3) piercing damage.
Soulbite (Recharge 5-6). Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 15 ft., one target. Hit: 26 (4d10+4) piercing damage, and the target must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. It takes 22 (4d10) necrotic damage and one level of fatigue on a failed save, or half as much damage and takes no fatigue on a successful one. The target’s hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to half the necrotic damage taken, and the dragon regains that many hit points. The reduction lasts until the target completes a long rest.
 

GuyBoy

Hero
I remember fighting one of these beasties back in 1E times in the 1980s.
It ruled a clan of hill giants near the town of Tell Qa in the Wilderlands of High Fantasy.
It was brutal!
 

Faolyn

(she/her)
The next critter is one I know remains popular among some folks, even though I’m not sure it ever officially appeared anywhere except this single article. At the very least, I've seen several attempts to turn them into a PC race. It’s the catwere, or tibbet, an adorable little creature of whimsy that the article says was the result of domestic cats mating with wizards’ familiars (oddly, the tibbet is psionic, not magical). I suppose that’s as good an explanation as any, really. At the same time, they were tied to Pandemonium, which... OK, they're cats, I can see that. I'm an inveterate cat-lover, but yeah, they're total chaos.

I wonder if Tibbet was the name of the writer’s cat and this was his attempt to immortalize his feline friend.

1662845742411.png

Art by Valerie Valusek--I finally realized those were two Vs and not a W.

Catwere (Tibbet)
The Dragon’s Bestiary, Dragon Magazine #135
Created by Scott Bennie

Also called tibbets, catweres came into being long ago when a fey-touched cat mated with a wizard’s cat familiar. A small number of those kittens were shapeshifters, and they went on to breed, and thus the catwere species was born.

In their true form, catweres resemble large (15-25 pound) cats with luxurious fur—often black, but potentially any solid color—and luminous blue or green eyes. They can change their shape to resemble a halfling, gnome, or other Small humanoid; they keep their eye and hair color in their humanoid form. Perhaps because of their unusual origins, a catwere’s eyes can see all manner of things, including, to a limited degree, the future. And more, they can grant other people visions of the future as well—including deliberately wrong images, an “ability” they use to punish those they don’t like.

A Great Comfort. Catweres have a tendency to latch onto certain people and serve as protectors and companions. They usually don’t let those people know that they are catweres, and all they ask for in return is pampering and affection. A crazy cat person may unknowingly “own” one or more of these fey creatures. Others are content to be “neighborhood cats” and patrol a few streets, befriending the inhabitants, protecting them all in return for pets and treats. A rare few will allow themselves to be employed by a spellcaster as a “familiar”—really, just a companion and occasional assistant and advisor—who will usually be allowed to know of the catwere’s true nature. Although they are by nature chaotic beings, they take their self-imposed duties quite seriously. They just can't stand for anyone else to try to make them do anything.

The Mind of a Cat. Catweres are have natural psychic abilities, although it's not necessarily obvious, since they use their abilities while doing normal cat things. They have the power to heal wounds, and do so by licking an injured spot or sitting on it and purring. They can tell the future primarily by knocking things off of high shelves and examining the way they fell on the ground like it was tea leaves or tossed divination stones. They can even go so far as to remove magical enchantments, which they do by hissing and batting at the magical object in question. To most outsiders, even their greatest magical abilities seem perfectly normal.

Cat Toys. Catweres prefer comfort and luxury—although their tastes run towards things that proper cats like, such as boxes, toy mice, comfy cushions, and fancy collars (which they actually like, rather than merely tolerate), rather than what most humanoids would consider luxurious. They do tend to be picky eaters, however, and quickly let their “owners” know what sort of foods they like.

Thieves in the Night. Although they would consider themselves to be collectors rather than thieves, catweres are inherently sneaky and tend to have a sticky fingers (or paws). They enjoy breaking into places, more for the challenge of it rather than out of maliciousness, and they like taking interesting things for themselves (or sometimes, to give to their chosen person). Again, their tastes are more catlike than anything else, so they are as likely to simply steal tiny trinkets, spare gloves, and other minor items as they are to steal anything valuable.

Legends and Lore
With an Arcana check, the characters can learn the following:

DC 10. Catweres are fey cats that can transform into small humanoids.

DC 15. Catweres prefer their feline form and will often act as a pet cat to a person they feel deserves one.

DC 20. Catweres have some minor precognitive abilities, and can even share those abilities with other people—for good or for ill, because they can also make people see false visions of the future.

Monster Encounters
Terrain:
Feywild, settlement

CR 1-2 1-3 catweres
Treasure silver collar with moonstone tag (worth 100 gp)

Signs
1. Catlike footprints where no cat should have gone.
2. Fangmarks in the lid of a container, and the contents missing.
3. A cat watching the party wherever it goes.
4. A person with far too many cats.

Behavior (in Cat Form)
1-3. Sleeping, preferably in a beam of sunlight or in a box.
4. Hunting a mouse or other small vermin.
5. Playing with a cat toy.
6. Lounging around, knowing it looks amazing.
7. Calculating the best way to knock something off a shelf.
8. Protecting some normal kittens who had been abandoned by their mother.

Behavior (in Humanoid Form)
1-2. Engaging in some cat burglary or pickpocketing.
3. Gambling with some humanoid friends.
4. Telling a story to a group of cats.
5. Playing somewhat malicious tricks on an ailurophobe.
6. Tracking down a creature who hurt its friend in order to get bloody revenge.

Catwere (Tibbet)
Tiny fey (beast, shapechanger)

Challenge 1/2 (50 XP)
AC 14
HP 14 (4d4+4; bloodied 7)
Speed 40 ft., climb 30 ft.

STR 8 (-1) DEX 18 (+4) CON 12 (+1)
INT 13 (+1) WIS 15 (+2) CHA 17 (+3)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 14
Saves Dex +6
Skills Deception +5, Perception +4, Persuasion +5, Sleight of Hand +6 (+1d4), Stealth +6 (+1d4)
Damage Resistances damage from nonmagical, nonsilvered weapons
Condition Immunities charmed, confused
Senses darkvision 60 ft., truesight 10 ft., passive Perception 14
Languages Common, Sylvan
Always Lands on Their Feet. A catwere is immune to falling damage.
Chaotic. The catwere radiates an aura of Chaos. Some catweres also radiate Good auras.
Evasion. If the catwere is subjected to an effect that allows it to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, the catwere instead takes no damage if it succeeds on the save, and only half damage if it fails.
Jumper. The catwere can jump up to 15 feet horizontally and 10 feet vertically without a running start.
Innate Spellcasting (Psionics). The catwere’s spellcasting trait is Intelligence (spell save DC 11). It can innately cast the following spells, requiring only Seen components:
1/day: augury, detect thoughts, dispel magic, cure wounds (as with 3rd-level slot), mirror image, misty step
Keen Hearing and Smell. The catwere has advantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on hearing or smell.
Precognitive (Recharges After a Short or Long Rest) The catwere glimpses the future and gains advantage on attack rolls, ability checks, and saving throws until the end of its next turn.
Speak With Cats. The catwere can communicate with felines of any type.

Actions
Claws (True Form Only).
Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 6 (1d4+4) slashing damage.
Dagger (Humanoid Form Only). Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 6 (1d4+4) piercing damage.
A Cat May Look At A King (Gaze; Recharges After a Short or Long Rest). The catwere targets a creature within 30 feet and one of the following effects occur:
• The creature is granted a brief image of the future and gains a d4 expertise die on one attack roll, ability check, or saving throw of its choice that it makes within the next minute.
• The creature gains true seeing to 10 feet until the end of its next turn.
• The creature is granted a twisted and incorrect image of the future, unless it succeeds on a DC 13 Wisdom saving throw. Until the end of its next turn, it rolls a d4 and must subtract it from every attack roll, ability check, or saving throw it makes.

Bonus Actions
Feline Agility.
The catwere can take the Dash, Disengage, or Hide action.
Shapeshift. The catwere magically changes its form, along with its equipment, to that of a specific Small humanoid or its true form, which is a Tiny cat. While shapeshifted, its statistics are otherwise unchanged. It reverts to its true form if it dies.

Combat
Catweres do not engage in combat unless they have no other choice, in which case they start with A Cat May Look At A King against the fiercest or more powerful-looking foe, then cast misty step to help them flee.
 
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Faolyn

(she/her)
This next article is a revision of the hunting system from the Wilderness Survival Guide (one of the few 1e books I own), which in the words of the article’s writer, is oversimplified. Complexity versus simplification has always been a bone of contention in gaming. I don’t feel like digging through that book to compare it to this article’s version (and anyway, it’s mostly climate/terrain tables), but I will convert some of the animals presented therein. Since they’re all regular beasts, I’ll just stick ‘em in a single entry. These beasts are: the fur seal, the giraffe, the harbor seal, the tapir, and the walrus. A rather motley assortment, and hopefully they’ll make your druids happy.


Beasts
What’s For Lunch, Dragon Magazine #137
Created by David Howery; all images taken from Wikipedia

1662929587311.png


Fur Seal
Large beast

Challenge 1/2 (100 XP)
AC 13 (natural armor)
HP 26 (4d10+4; bloodied 13)
Speed 15 ft., swim 50 ft.

STR 14 (+2) DEX 15 (+2) CON 12 (+1)
INT 3 (-4) WIS 12 (+1) CHA 6 (-2)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 13
Skills Perception +3
Senses darkvision 30 ft., passive Perception 13
Languages
Hold Breath. The seal can hold its breath for 30 minutes.
Keen Hearing and Smell. When underwater, the seal has advantage on Perception checks that rely on hearing and smell.

Actions
Bite.
Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 9 (2d6+2) piercing damage.


1662929684849.png

Giraffe
Huge beast

Challenge 2 (450 XP)
AC 10
HP 42 (5d12+10; bloodied 21)
Speed 50 ft.

STR 18 (+4) DEX 10 (+0) CON 14 (+2)
INT 2 (-4) WIS 10 (+0) CHA 5 (-3)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 14
Skills Perception +2
Senses passive Perception 12
Languages

Actions
Hoof.
Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 11 (2d6+4) bludgeoning damage.


1662929627778.png

Harbor Seal
Medium beast

Challenge 1/4 (50 XP)
AC 14 (natural armor)
HP 11 (2d8+2; bloodied 5)
Speed 15 ft., swim 50 ft.

STR 12 (+1) DEX 16 (+3) CON 12 (+1)
INT 3 (-4) WIS 12 (+1) CHA 6 (-2)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 13
Skills Perception +3
Senses darkvision 30 ft., passive Perception 13
Languages
Hold Breath. The seal can hold its breath for 30 minutes.
Keen Hearing and Smell. When underwater, the seal has advantage on Perception checks that rely on hearing and smell.

Actions
Bite.
Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 6 (1d6+3) piercing damage.


1662929764659.png

Tapir
Medium beast

Challenge 1/8 (25 XP)
AC 12 (natural armor)
HP 13 (2d8+4; bloodied 6)
Speed 30 ft., swim 30 ft.

STR 15 (+2) DEX 10 (+0) CON 14 (+2)
INT 2 (-4) WIS 11 (+0) CHA 5 (-3)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 12
Senses passive Perception
Languages
Hold Breath. The tapir can hold its breath for up to 5 minutes.
Keen Smell. The tapir has advantage on Perception checks that rely on smell.

Actions
Bite.
Melee Weapon Attack: +4 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 4 (1d4+2) piercing damage.


1662929802491.png

Walrus
Large beast

Challenge 2 (450 XP)
AC 13 (natural armor)
HP 45 (6d10+12); bloodied 22
Speed 10 ft., swim 50 ft.

STR 20 (+5) DEX 8 (-1) CON 15 (+2)
INT 3 (-4) WIS 12 (+1) CHA 6 (-2)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 15
Skills Perception +3
Senses tremorsense 30ft., passive Perception 11
Languages
Hold Breath. The walrus can hold its breath for 30 minutes.
Keen Smell. When underwater, the walrus has advantage on Perception checks that rely on smell.
Vibrissae. The walrus’s tremorsense only works underwater.

Actions
Tusks.
Melee Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (2d8+5) piercing damage. If the target is a creature, it must make a DC 15 Strength saving throw or fall prone.
 



The Lesuit

Explorer
I'm sorry--what is this in reference to?
This is probably the totally wrong place to ask this question (my apologies).

In the Level Up - Monstrous Menagerie, under the Champion NPC entry, there is a Warhordling Orc War Chief variant.

That variant has a Whirling Axe ability.
 

Faolyn

(she/her)
This is probably the totally wrong place to ask this question (my apologies).

In the Level Up - Monstrous Menagerie, under the Champion NPC entry, there is a Warhordling Orc War Chief variant.

That variant has a Whirling Axe ability.
It's OK, although I'm not 100% sure of the question. If it's about the difference in ranges, I'd guess that the ettin's Whirling Axe has a 10-foot reach because ettins normally have 5 foot reaches, but this action gives them a longer range. Warhordling Orc War Chiefs simply don't have that extra range. They're not that big.

Anyway.

This issues Wilderness theme continues with the following article on beasts from the Cenozoic—which happens to contain my personal favorite prehistoric beasts. Dinosaurs are cool and all, but give me a weirdo early mammal any day. I like having these animals in my settings, since they managed to be both mundane and fantastic all at the same time, and some of them can easily be used as domesticated beasts or common prey animals—or as a nonmagical danger of the wilderness. As it turns out, though, a surprising number of these creatures can really just be considered variants on existing ones, and many don't even need any reskinning--just give 'em a different name and call it a day. As such, I only felt the need to convert two creatures: the glyptodon and ground sloth. Just for the heck of it, I gave the ground sloth a variant that should feel familiar to fans of Dark Sun.

Cenozoic Beasts
Into the Age of Mammals, Dragon Magazine #137
Created by David Howery; images taken from Wikipedia


1663015616677.png


Glyptodon
From a distance, a glyptodon might be mistaken for a huge turtle, but are actually a distant relative of the armadillo. They are primarily placid grazers, but they can defend themselves with their tails, which end in heavy clubs.

Glyptodon
Large beast

Challenge 2 (450 XP)
AC 14 (natural armor)
HP 45 (6d10+12; bloodied 22)
Speed 30 ft.

STR 18 (+4) DEX 8 (-1) CON 14 (+2)
INT 2 (-4) WIS 12 (+1) CHA 5 (-3)

Proficiency +2
Maneuver DC 14
Senses passive Perception 11
Languages

Actions
Tail.
Melee Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 13 (2d8+4) bludgeoning damage, and the target must make a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or fall prone and be stunned until the end of its next turn.

*

1663015414069.png


Ground Sloth
Despite being generally inoffensive browsers and grazers, ground sloths are formidable foes against any potential hunter. Their skin is thickly armored, they have foot-long claws on each forepaw, and when they rear up on their hind legs, they can stand as much as 17 feet tall.

Ground Sloth (Megatherium)
Huge beast

Challenge 5 (1,800 XP)
AC 15 (natural armor)
HP 95 (10d12+30; bloodied 47)
Speed 30 ft.

STR 22 (+6) DEX 10 (+0) CON 16 (+3)
INT 2 (-4) WIS 10 (+0) CHA 4 (-3)

Proficiency +3
Maneuver DC 17
Senses passive Perception 10
Languages

Actions
Claws.
Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 15 (2d8+6) slashing damage.

Variant: Dire Sloth
Ages ago, fiendish magic mutated a family of ground sloths, changing these tranquil herbivores into vicious, bloodthirsty carnivores. This mutant group has survived and spread out since then, killing and eating their way across the world (but their favorite food is halflings). They are highly cunning beasts and far more bloodthirsty than any animal should be.

A dire sloth has is CR 6 (2,300 XP) and has 114 (12d12+36; bloodied 57) hit points. It Intelligence is 4 (-3), its speed is 40 ft., it is immune to poison damage and the poisoned condition, and it is proficient in Perception and Stealth. It has the following new traits:

Keen Smell. The dire sloth has advantage on Perception checks that rely on smell.
Pack Tactics. The dire sloth has advantage on attack rolls against a creature if at least one of the sloth’s allies is within 5 feet of the creature and is not incapacitated.
Relentless (1/Day). If the dire sloth takes 14 or less damage that would reduce it to 0 hit points, it is instead reduced to 1 hit point.

It also has the following new actions:

Multiattack: The dire sloth attacks with its bite and its claws.
Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 17 (2d10+6) piercing damage, and the target is grappled (escape DC 17). Until this grapple ends, the target is restrained and the sloth can’t bite a different attack.
 

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