log in or register to remove this ad

 

D&D 5E Adv. League: What's in it for a GM?

Emirikol

Adventurer
I'm looking at DMing for Adventurer's League. What's in it for me as a DM? I have zero control over the set-up, timing, events and the players at the table right? Why would I slave myself out for that? I've run other OP stuff over the years, and this just gives me an odd feeling compared to the other OP stuff I've run.

Thoughts?

jh

DnD_ADVL.png


..
 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad

I'm not really sure. I only ran OP when I didn't have a regular game. I've never been a huge fan of OP as a DM or Player, outside of conventions.
 

Coredump

First Post
Why play in AL? Because you like to play.
Why DM in AL? Because you like to DM.

Whether you play or DM, there are significant differences between a home or OP setting..... Some people don't like playing in OP, some don't like DMing in OP.


I would prefer a home game, but that isn't an option currently, and the other players at the LGS are pretty solid. I am thinking about DMing, because I like DMing.
 

Emirikol

Adventurer
Loving to DM is a great ideal to be sure. I'm just not seeing why it's worth all the trouble compared to other org.play stuff out there. It is a HUGE hassle to set up the game, as you have to go through the game store. I've been sitting on my bum for 3 weeks waiting for a response from our local stores as they don't even know what's up. Remember when we could just "order an adventure" and "run the adventure?"

Now it's like a bureaucratic nightmare! What kind of incentive is that?

jh
 


GlobeOfDankness

Banned
Banned
if you think of DMing dungeons and dragons as slave labor then i doubt anything you read here will make it fun for you.

have you thought about trying pyramid building?
 

Coredump

First Post
Loving to DM is a great ideal to be sure. I'm just not seeing why it's worth all the trouble compared to other org.play stuff out there. It is a HUGE hassle to set up the game, as you have to go through the game store. I've been sitting on my bum for 3 weeks waiting for a response from our local stores as they don't even know what's up. Remember when we could just "order an adventure" and "run the adventure?"

Now it's like a bureaucratic nightmare! What kind of incentive is that?

jh

So your store stinks.... sorry to hear that.
 

SirAntoine

Banned
Banned
I guess the biggest incentive is to bring new people into the hobby. If the game store doesn't have any events, ask if you can run your own. If you are willing to commit to running the event at a specific time each week or something, you might help bring people to the store regularly. The last time I asked at a game store what events they had with Adventurer's League, they had never even heard of it.
 

payn

Legend
Its a really good place to start for beginning GMs. They have a lot of tools and hopefully a helpful community to lead them on their way to being competent and confident GMs. For experienced GMs its a social outlet. You get a chance to meet gamers from the community talk shop, share stories, and learn together. I think if you expect an identical experience to what you have in a home game you will disappointed. One must learn to temper their expectations of organized play. If you cant find a reason for it to work for you then maybe it wont.
 

Ghost Matter

First Post
The lack of control is actually really fun. I can just read the adventure, show up, and concentrate on DMing. My local organizer said he likes it because it allows him to concentrate on playing NPCs.
 

Riley37

First Post
It's not for everyone.

I've been playing in an AL game at a local gaming store, because when I moved to this town, that's the first game I could find and join. I'm about to take a turn as DM, for about three months, so that the previous DM gets to take a turn as a player.

When I moved to San Mateo, the game store welcomed me to try 5E, and some of the first friends I've made here are friends from D&D. My personal moral compass requires me to pay that forward, so that the metaphorical door which was open and welcoming when I arrived, is also open and welcoming for others who arrive after me.

Yes, the store has certain standards and rules, because the game is *under their roof* and they have a reputation to maintain and protect, as does WotC. There are parents who drop off their teenage children, and those parents trust that the DM won't teach those children any more (or nastier) swearwords than ones their children already know. I'm OK with that. I'm even OK without pizza and cola at the table!

When the game store closes, many of us stay and chat on the sidewalk just outside. I see that as a good sign.
 

was

Adventurer
...Realistically, you would probably see very few material rewards from DMing this. Certainly nothing that would adequately compensate you for the time and energy expenditure.

...From an intrinsic standpoint, you would get to introduce gaming to the next generation. You would get to pass on the gaming values that you find important (fairness, equality..etc). Finally, you would get the opportunity to put a positive face on the gaming community.

...To me, the deciding factor would have to be how willing the store's management is to support you. If they're really not that interested in helping you out, then you certainly shouldn't feel obligated to run something that promotes their products.
 


S

Sunseeker

Guest
Because it's fun and quick and you don't have to work very hard? Everything is by-the-book, everything is pre-designed, you pretty much just turn it on and it runs.
 

pogre

Legend
It seems like a decent platform to poach good players from - I have not done it myself, so this is pure speculation on my part.
 

Reynard

Legend
If there are no actual benefits to running AL events specifically, just start a store game on your own terms. I doubt anyone clamoring to play D&D is going to turn their nose up at it because it is not an OP game -- and if they do, tell them to run AL games. I started a Pathfinder in store game (it started with Monte Cook's Dungeon-a-Day megadungeon) and even though I don't run or play in that game anymore due to time constraints, it is still going strong with plenty of players and new GMs. Drawing in new players does not require a organized play structure, it just requires folks playing in public. And if WotC can't be bothered to adequately reward DMs who volunteer to run the AL games, people should not do that thing.
 


mflayermonk

First Post
I'm looking at DMing for Adventurer's League. What's in it for me as a DM? I have zero control over the set-up, timing, events and the players at the table right? Why would I slave myself out for that? I've run other OP stuff over the years, and this just gives me an odd feeling compared to the other OP stuff I've run.

Thoughts?

jh

How about DMing AL at a convention? There the benefit is a badge. You can even bargain on slots for the badge. I had a local con tell me that they only gave out badges for running xx slots and I bargained them down to x- slots for a badge (they were so short on judges).
 

darjr

I crit!
I'm lucky in that my FLGS isn't afraid of requiring a decent level of behavior and cleanliness. Nor are they afraid of banning people, it's actually increased the participation at the store. I'm shocked that there are places that are not willing to do this.

I love to GM. I'd rather GM. I've met some fantastic folks via the public venue. Folks I'd never have otherwise met. We'll have three or four tables on a given Wednesday night (one that has 13 players at it, and mine that will often have seven or more) and seeing other GM's in action is interesting and entertaining. Besides it's really like a big party that I get to play D&D at. No, I get to GM D&D at, even better!
 

Psikerlord#

Explorer
I always imagined the only reason to play AL is to meet new people, and if you all get on, over time turn the group into a home game.

No-one plays AL for an extended period, do they? I dont know maybe they do.
 

Level Up!

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top