D&D General AI ranks D&D editions

GSHamster

Adventurer
Another forum I read is playing around with ChatGPT, the newest text-generation AI. One of the posters asked it to rank D&D editions, and I thought this forum would be interested in the results.

Prompt: Write a top five list of the best editions of Dungeons and Dragons. Include common criticisms of each edition.

Response:
1. Dungeons and Dragons 5th Edition (D&D 5e) - This is currently the most popular edition of the game and is known for its focus on storytelling and player choice. It is also praised for its streamlined rules and easily accessible character creation. Common criticisms of 5e include its lack of character customization options and its reliance on the "theater of the mind" for combat, which can be difficult for some players to visualize.

2. Dungeons and Dragons 3rd Edition (D&D 3e) - This edition introduced the d20 system, which has become the foundation for many other tabletop RPGs. It is known for its flexibility and the ability to create highly specialized characters. However, it is also criticized for its complex rules and reliance on min-maxing and optimization, which can make the game less enjoyable for casual players.

3. Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition (D&D 4e) - This edition was a major departure from previous editions, with a focus on tactical combat and a more structured game world. It introduced the concept of "powers" for each character class, which allowed for more diverse and dynamic abilities. However, it was also criticized for its lack of support for non-combat activities and its reliance on pre-written adventures, which some players felt limited their ability to create their own stories.

4. Dungeons and Dragons Original Edition (D&D 1e) - This is the first edition of the game, and is known for its simplicity and flexibility. It is also praised for its focus on player creativity and the ability to create unique campaigns. However, it is also criticized for its lack of structure and organization, which can make the game difficult for new players to learn.

5. Dungeons and Dragons 2nd Edition (D&D 2e) - This edition introduced many of the core concepts that are still present in modern editions of the game, including character classes, levels, and the alignment system. It is known for its expansive list of spells and abilities, which allowed for a wide range of character options. However, it is also criticized for its complex rules and the need for a comprehensive understanding of the game mechanics in order to play effectively.

Source: Re: ChatGPT
 

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payn

Legend
I think the descriptions are a really good snap shot, with the exception of 4E. I imagine the class roles being more important to point out than powers, but its fine I guess for a single paragraph general statement.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Two things-

1. I don't think it's possible to engage with the post substantively without getting involved in edition warring of some type (even inadvertently) and having the thread closed.

2. As someone who has had an interest in AI for a long time, the rapid rapid rapid advance of deep learning (machine learning) has been awesome, in both the modern and older sense (inspring awe or dread) of the word. AI was always kinda sorta like fusion ... "20 years away," but it feels uncomfortably like we might have already past the point of AI (if not Skynet).

Good times!
 


Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
Proof that AI isn't replacing actual writers any time soon lol. Many of those things are...not remotely correct, and some of the most popular discussed features and criticisms aren't even mentioned.
 


Lidgar

Legend
All your base are belong to Al.

Stanley Kubrick 70Mm GIF by Coolidge Corner Theatre
 


the Jester

Legend

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Proof that AI isn't replacing actual writers any time soon lol. Many of those things are...not remotely correct, and some of the most popular discussed features and criticisms aren't even mentioned.

I mean ... that's one way to look at it.

Another way to look at it is this- you now have freely available, publicly accessibly AIs that can generate text from prompts that look as if a human generated them. It may not be the best work out there, but it's better than a lot of high school level writing (not to mention the "foreign webpages" we see so often).

This is just the last couple of years, and freely available, and generated from a writing prompt BTW. Something that five years would not have been remotely possible.

Put it this way-

Three years ago, if someone suggested that AIs would be replacing artists in the next twenty years, I would probably have laughed.
This year, we are having serious conversations about ... AI replacing artists (illustrators, etc.) and the ramifications of that in the next few years.

Things are moving really really really quickly- and in a lot examples, we don't understand how these things operate ... just that, unlike a lot of other things, they are scalable.
 

Huh. That's interesting. I wouldn't have ranked 3e so highly, but yeah, the creation of the OGL was seismic shift in RPGs, one that is still felt to this day.

One thing AI doesn't give is the why of the rankings. Which a human absolutely would've provided for so hot a take as ranking 4e above 1e.
 




Mannahnin

Scion of Murgen (He/Him)
Proof that AI isn't replacing actual writers any time soon lol. Many of those things are...not remotely correct, and some of the most popular discussed features and criticisms aren't even mentioned.

Another way to look at it is this- you now have freely available, publicly accessibly AIs that can generate text from prompts that look as if a human generated them. It may not be the best work out there, but it's better than a lot of high school level writing (not to mention the "foreign webpages" we see so often).

This is just the last couple of years, and freely available, and generated from a writing prompt BTW. Something that five years would not have been remotely possible.
One of my favorite pagan and folklore writers just made a post about this. Apparently the #1 book under "celtic paganism" on Amazon right now is by "Mari Silva", who appears to be an AI-based writer or content farm, both from reviews of their text and the fact that they've put out 312 books in the last two and a half years. :(
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
That text is frankly Turing complete, if you hadn't said it was AI I would never have known, absolutely looks like something a person would put together.

Well, the problem is ... Chinese Room Argument.

Is it understanding what it is doing?

But then again .... do we understand what we're doing?
 



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