D&D General Appendix EN - What one book/series inspires your D&D?


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Legatus Legionis

< BWAH HA Ha ha >
Robert E Howard's Conan The Barbarian series:

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Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Ursula K. LeGuin's A Wizard of Earthsea. Also the very first fantasy book I ever read.

Every homebrew setting I've done since has had an archipelago. It's shaped my thinking about summonings and true names. And dragons are never just monsters.

I know it's in the 5e Appendix E, but since the series started in 1964 it's a crying shame it wasn't in the original Appendix N.
 

Voadam

Legend
Ursula K. LeGuin's A Wizard of Earthsea. Also the very first fantasy book I ever read.

Every homebrew setting I've done since has had an archipelago. It's shaped my thinking about summonings and true names. And dragons are never just monsters.

I know it's in the 5e Appendix E, but since the series started in 1964 it's a crying shame it wasn't in the original Appendix N.
And as far as I can tell pretty foundational for the big idea of a D&D wizard college.
 


steeldragons

Steeliest of the dragons
Epic
Surprised it hasn't been mentioned yet....or/and/but I'm just old...

Piers Anthony, the "Magic of Xanth" series.

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PS: NO idea who "Beth" is, but I gather she sells these...at a bargain, apparently. I just wanted some cover pix.
 
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Urriak Uruk

Gaming is fun, and fun is for everyone
I'll do two, one I'm reading now and another I read as a child.

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Journey to the West is a really great example of world-building, making an adventuring party, a clearly defined goal (go to the West to deliver some scrolls!) that is continually derailed by fun and thrilling side-quests. It's a great reminder that not every adventure needs to have doom-and-gloom, world-ending or even city-ending stakes... all you got to do is walk across a continent! Filled with memorable encounters, some solved through combat but many others with trickery and diplomacy, there's a lot to learn here and it's a great read (if you like reading truly old-school poetry-novels!). If you need a Western equivalent, pick up the Odyssey, they got a similar shtick!

And childhood book, Eragon. Yeah, it's essentially the plot of Star Wars in Tolkien-world (with a dragon), but who cares we all love it! The latter books get into more developed themes and character arcs, but this first book was a big hit for a reason... it's got the heroes journey nailed down pat, with another world-building trek across the continent.

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Mournblade94

Adventurer
I have read hundreds of scifi/fantasy books.

For D&D gaming, I find scifi/fantasy via tv and movies far more inspiring.
Why do you find it so?

For me I find the books most inspriring. My wife made the observation that I am literally better at understanding story through books than movie or TV. I miss so much when I watch movies or TV, I get looped in technicalities.
 

Lidgar

Gongfarmer
Several books from Andre Norton comes to mind. Inspirational in terms of lots of interesting antagonists, characters, and worlds. She was a prolific, pretty awesome author.

A perennial favorite is the Witch World cycle. For an story based on an actual D&D session with Gygax, check out Quag Keep. For a very cool take on an other-world faerie world, check out Dread Companion.
 
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