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5E concentration in 5th edition, whats your fix?

Concentration

  • half duration

    Votes: 1 0.5%
  • Wisdom save

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • do away with it

    Votes: 10 4.7%
  • or play as is

    Votes: 203 94.9%

  • Total voters
    214

dwayne

Explorer
Having run older versions of D&D I was a little taken aback by the concentration of spells that will require concentration. I am just talking about spells with the mechanic right now but may address other concentration issues later. As it stands way too many spells have this and not to mention the wizard has been neutered beyond what he should be. Bam hit well the one spell that i can cast to help that needs concentration ends because of con save fail. And only one can be cast that reqires concentration which does not leave many options on your list, no wonder i don't have a single mage in my game group. So this is what I propose i did some checking and there are 10 rounds in a minute and most spells that require concentration last that long max. So lets say you cast a spell that requires concentration but opt for not concentrating then I would say the duration would be haf of base which would be 5 rounds. now in most of my old games I ran most combat does not go past a few rounds let alone 5 and if they do the other side is hurting pretty good. So I think this would be a good work around for the caster in the group and give a bit of the old feel to how the caster was well more useful. Or you could make the concentration a mental thing and a wisdom save as being a marine most things are the will and deternination to focus and keep alive is inpart a mental thing as much as physical.
 

neogod22

Villager
Having run older versions of D&D I was a little taken aback by the concentration of spells that will require concentration. I am just talking about spells with the mechanic right now but may address other concentration issues later. As it stands way too many spells have this and not to mention the wizard has been neutered beyond what he should be. Bam hit well the one spell that i can cast to help that needs concentration ends because of con save fail. And only one can be cast that reqires concentration which does not leave many options on your list, no wonder i don't have a single mage in my game group. So this is what I propose i did some checking and there are 10 rounds in a minute and most spells that require concentration last that long max. So lets say you cast a spell that requires concentration but opt for not concentrating then I would say the duration would be haf of base which would be 5 rounds. now in most of my old games I ran most combat does not go past a few rounds let alone 5 and if they do the other side is hurting pretty good. So I think this would be a good work around for the caster in the group and give a bit of the old feel to how the caster was well more useful. Or you could make the concentration a mental thing and a wisdom save as being a marine most things are the will and deternination to focus and keep alive is inpart a mental thing as much as physical.
It's kind of a 2 way street. Sure your wizard can't stack spells, but then again, neither can monsters. It speeds up combat, because a wizard isn't spending the 1st t rounds of combat stacking protection spells, or creating a quagmire of obstacles. Also it allows casters to be viable for more than one combat seeing that if they aren't blowing multiple slots stacking defenses in case someone gets into melee. I never had a problem with concentration saves, because my casters usually have a decent CON, or they have the War Caster feat.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
 

pogre

Adventurer
I like the concentration mechanic a lot. It makes sense and slows down the most powerful classes in the game.
 
I played it as is. We'd discussed an optional rule to let you concentrate on a second spell by spending your action, so you could cast Fly turn 1, Invisibility turn 2, and thereafter spend your action to concentrate, so all you could do is move and take bonus actions.
 

Mouseferatu

Villager
I played it as is. We'd discussed an optional rule to let you concentrate on a second spell by spending your action, so you could cast Fly turn 1, Invisibility turn 2, and thereafter spend your action to concentrate, so all you could do is move and take bonus actions.
Interesting.

I like the concentration mechanic as-is, and most suggestions I've seen to get rid of it would overbalance the caster classes. This is the first house rule for allowing concentration on more than one spell that I might actually consider allowing in my games.
 

Seramus

Explorer
the wizard has been neutered beyond what he should be.
Relative to what? Wizards are one of the most powerful classes in the game, able to be tremendously effective in any of the three pillars by custom picking their spells upon level up, or even being moderately effective at all three based on the whims of the player.

The only thing I could imagine doing with concentration mechanic is getting rid of the constitution save. It just slows down gameplay.
 

Saelorn

Explorer
The closest thing I have to a house rule for concentration is that the paladin's normal smite mechanic uses the same rules as all of its smite spells: bonus action, concentration, and it affects your next hit.

Concentration is one of the most important balancing factors in this edition, and while the primary benefit is to help keep spellcasters in line with the other classes, it also helps spellcasters to slow down and conserve spell slots instead of spending everything at once. I would never consider removing it.
 

ad_hoc

Explorer
Half the threads on the topic complain about Wizards being too strong, the other half, too weak.

Concentration itself is a great mechanic. It adds a lot of choice and tension to the game.

Also, the thread title is begging the question.
 

Nevvur

Explorer
Having run older versions of D&D I was a little taken aback by the concentration of spells that will require concentration. I am just talking about spells with the mechanic right now but may address other concentration issues later. As it stands way too many spells have this and not to mention the wizard has been neutered beyond what he should be. Bam hit well the one spell that i can cast to help that needs concentration ends because of con save fail. And only one can be cast that reqires concentration which does not leave many options on your list, no wonder i don't have a single mage in my game group. So this is what I propose i did some checking and there are 10 rounds in a minute and most spells that require concentration last that long max. So lets say you cast a spell that requires concentration but opt for not concentrating then I would say the duration would be haf of base which would be 5 rounds. now in most of my old games I ran most combat does not go past a few rounds let alone 5 and if they do the other side is hurting pretty good. So I think this would be a good work around for the caster in the group and give a bit of the old feel to how the caster was well more useful. Or you could make the concentration a mental thing and a wisdom save as being a marine most things are the will and deternination to focus and keep alive is inpart a mental thing as much as physical.
I feel like the existing concentration mechanic is too hard baked into the bigger act of class balance to feel okay about granting spellcasters even more power. This isn't strictly an argument against improving concentration mechanics in the favor of magic users so much as it is an argument against empowering spellcasters when I perceive them as already being generally more powerful than non-spellcasters. Every time I see a proposal for giving magic users more candy, I feel compelled to ask, "What do martial characters get?"

You don't have to answer that. Just food for thought.

I played it as is. We'd discussed an optional rule to let you concentrate on a second spell by spending your action, so you could cast Fly turn 1, Invisibility turn 2, and thereafter spend your action to concentrate, so all you could do is move and take bonus actions.
I would play a sorcerer with Quicken Spell at such a table. No question. Possibly a paladin, to run a normal buff spell and be able to load a spell smite without breaking it.
 

Slit518

Explorer
Caster classes used to be wildly powerful in previous editions of the game.

They would be able to have a plethora of spells cast on party members and themselves, as well as debuffing elements on enemies.

This helps balance them out a bit without overwhelming the game with their ongoing duration spells.

Though, this does not prevent multiple casters from using their concentration slot to beef up a character or the party.
 

jgsugden

Explorer
I use it as is, but I have considered allowing spellcasters to concentrate on multiple lower level spells.

The rule would be that you would get a number of concentration points equal to half your spellcaster level rounded up, as determined by the multiclassing rules for spellcasters (spellcasting levels for wizards are 1/lvl, paladins 1/2 lvl, eldritch knight 1/3 lvl). To concentrate on a spell you need to use a number of your concentration points equal to the spell level of the spell plus 1/additional spell youre already concentrating upon. For example, a 17th lvl wizard would have 9 concentration points. He coud concentrate on one 9th level spell for 9 concentration points, or he could concentrate on two 4th level spells (the first one would cost 4 concentration, the second 4+1=5 concentration), or he could concentrate on a 4th lvl and two first level (with the 4th level costing 2, the first 1st level cost 1+1, and the second 1+2 for a total of 9 cooncentration.

A 5th level wizard could concetrate on two first level spells, an 11th level wizard three first level spells and a 19th level could concentrate on four first level spells.

I'm betting you'd mostly see the multiple concentration spells start to see use at 9th level when the could concetrate ona 3rd and 1st level spell....
 
Interesting.

I like the concentration mechanic as-is, and most suggestions I've seen to get rid of it would overbalance the caster classes. This is the first house rule for allowing concentration on more than one spell that I might actually consider allowing in my games.
It was also proposed so that, say, a wizard could have up two effects to lock down two guys, but he's trading his turn to keep the second guy locked down.

We actually didn't go with the idea. The last 5e game I ran we capped at 9th level with a bard, a warlock, a paladin, a sorcerer, and a fighter who took a few levels of cleric. In the penultimate session they knew an army was marching on their town, because the wizard in charge of the army intended to perform a ritual there.

Full story, but not relevant to the main post
[sblock]A nation had its laws inscribed in a book artifact that prevented anyone outside the line of succession from ruling. I'd established Baphomet, as the demon lord of savagery, had the power that the presence of him or his unholy servants would cause text in nearby books to be unmade. In order to destroy the Book of Eight Lands and establish a magocracy, the wizard intended to summon Baphomet. The whole campaign had a 'book' theme, with demiplanes like out of Myst.[/sblock]

The PCs didn't need to defeat the army, just kill the wizard, without whom they couldn't do the ritual. So they devised Operation Bloodtalon. They scouted the location the army would march and found a steep hill they would need to pass, then hid just out of sight. When the stone golem elephant - atop which the lead wizard and his erinyes bodyguard rode - tromped past, the party struck.

The cleric cast enhance ability (Strength) on the bard.
The paladin cast bless on the bard.
The warlock cast fly on the bard.
The sorcerer cast haste on the bard.
The bard cast greater invisibility on herself. She was a grappler build.

Next round, everyone readies an action to attack, except the bard. She flies at incredible speed over the hill, invisible, and grapples the wizard, then dashes back over the hill. Everyone attacks the wizard. He dies.

The army freaks out and tries to crest the hill. The sorcerer and warlock each grab some people and dimension door away, out of sight. And that's why concentration is still perfectly fine as is.
 
Last edited:

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
Given how grossly powerful main spell-casters could be in previous editions, I *love* the concentration mechanism.

Next round, everyone readies an action to attack, except the bard. She flies at incredible speed over the hill, invisible, and grapples the wizard, then dashes back over the hill. Everyone attacks the wizard. He dies.

The army freaks out and tries to crest the hill. The sorcerer and warlock each grab some people and dimension door away, out of sight. And that's why concentration is still perfectly fine as is.
Bravo!
 

Cyber-Dave

Villager
The "fix" for concentration is to use it as written. It is one of the best rules in 5e. It is one of the key mechanics that keeps the game simple, balanced, and fun. At least, that is my 2 cents.
 

dwayne

Explorer
Also in the case, if concentration, where to break you, could only get 1d4 rounds of the spell to the max limit of the spell would normally last. Now if this may be too much for those who say wizards are powerful more than other classes well yes spells are a nasty attack. But casters are not strong in many ways and as to only casting each spell around and limited number to have any way should be a factor. if extra spells are a thing then one of my more exsperianced players who has played the system more suggested to do this " Perhaps something like you can concentrate on a second spell, but you have disadvantage on concentration saves, they become a minimum DC 15, and (in addition to taking damage) if you use your action or move on your turn, you have to make save." I think maybe this with a feat that could change the save to wisdom or super charge a spell each round that would run on its own for a limited duration of 1d8+2 rounds not sure just spit balling. As have not rteally looked at the feat stuff just yet.
 

Kobold Avenger

Explorer
I don't have a problem with Concentration, I do have a big problem with Damage saves to keep concentration spells going. I would eliminate the damage save which is easily forgotten even when trying to use it. It's just more rolling dice and I feel it should have been an optional rule to begin with.
 

77IM

Explorer!!!
I do think the designers of 5E went a little overboard applying the concentration mechanic. Some spells are pretty much never going to be taken because they use up your concentration slot. Other spells require you to get into melee, and that's rough because then you get hit and stop concentrating. Then there are completely awesome spells like spiritual weapon that for some bizarre reason don't require concentration. It totally doesn't make any sense to me.
 
I do think the designers of 5E went a little overboard applying the concentration mechanic. Some spells are pretty much never going to be taken because they use up your concentration slot. Other spells require you to get into melee, and that's rough because then you get hit and stop concentrating. Then there are completely awesome spells like spiritual weapon that for some bizarre reason don't require concentration. It totally doesn't make any sense to me.
i agree a more then a few spells just dont make sense with concentration, but i like the mechanic as it is.If nothing else it flat out prevents the tedious two page long sequence of things my wizard does at higher level ever moement of the day in just tax, because if you were at high level you spent the better part of your day making sure your team didnt lose the game of rocket tag that dnd had become.

now i wake up, cast mage armor, and im pretty ready for the day. adding concentration didnt just streamline things, it killed alot of tedious gameplay that was practically mandatory.
 

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