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D&D 5E Connecting the Planes: What New Interstitial Setting Do You Want?

What interstitial campaign setting would you like to see published? (ONE CHOICE ONLY)

  • Planescape

    Votes: 32 37.6%
  • Spelljammer

    Votes: 24 28.2%
  • Manual of the Planes (Generic)

    Votes: 22 25.9%
  • None. I hate the outer planes. And inner planes more.

    Votes: 4 4.7%
  • D&D drove me to drink and I didn't even have the decency to thank Hasbro for it.

    Votes: 3 3.5%

  • Total voters
    85
  • This poll will close: .

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Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
Supporter
I guess it depends on what you want. If you want a complete planar mythology then stuff like Manual of the Planes is great. I have no use for that kind of content. I want to know how and why my players could get there, survive there, and whom they might interact with. Other than that I need a brief outline and a bunch of hooks and rumours. That's why Sigil is a such a cool center point - it's got access to everywhere anyway, and it's packed to the gills with factions, faces, intrigue and adventure hooks. If you reimagine it slightly as a Spelljamming port, in addition to the doors, and add that kind of regular traffic in and out of the city, I think it sounds awesome as a central nexus for adventure.
 

I can punch Odin into another ZIP Code and feed Hexor his own teeth; why does some snotty waif in a sword mask get the kind of no-sell powers reserved for popular wrestlers?
That's only what she looks like to allow people to avoid the sanity loss while she's trying to keep her city free of annoyances messing it up.

You uh, don't want to see what happens when the mask comes off and she unveils her true form. Tends to involve deities ending up as blood splatters


Anywho, I remain a fan of 4E's Astral Sea with a heaping spoonful of Planescape to go along with it
 

SkidAce

Hero
Supporter
@Ruin Explorer , you keep saying that planes books are full of useless info, yet I buy and use as many as I can get.

Manual of the Planes (3) Beyond Countless Doorways, Portals and Planes, Planescape box sets, etc., Primal Order, Chessboards, etc ...

I mine that stuff for bit and parts and adventure locals all the time.

(Of course my home campaign from the 80s to now IS a multidimensional nexus, so there's that...)
 

Mercurius

Legend
I voted Manual of the Planes but really meant "all of the above." Or to quote an oft-used meme, "why can't we have both?"

I want a big book of cosmology with different cosmologies that explain the plains and multiple ways to explore them.

It shouldn't be Planescape or Spelljammer or whatever. It should be all of the above, with options and guidance on how to cook up your own brew.
 

(Of course my home campaign from the 80s to now IS a multidimensional nexus, so there's that...)
Yeah that might be a minor factor mate lol.

And you're still describing something that's largely useless, because you're basically picking through it for additional usable info.
It shouldn't be Planescape or Spelljammer or whatever. It should be all of the above, with options and guidance on how to cook up your own brew.
Why can't we have both? Because there's absolutely no possible way for WotC to do justice to what you're describing in a single book of 256 pages (which will also inevitably have a lot of pages devoted to monsters, archetypes, lineages, probably spells and so on), which is the maximum we're getting. That's one of the key reasons I'm against what you're suggesting, this sort of multiverse cookbook, because all you'll get, is a ton of quarter-arsed junk. I've seen it plenty of times before in TT RPGs - "we covered everything in minimal detail and it was useless to everyone!". In older RPGs they'd then release actual sourcebooks for all the stuff they quarter-arsed, but WotC isn't doing that.

Also, I've never, ever seen a writer who was any good at "options and guidance on how to cook up your own brew" write for WotC. Not even once. I don't think WotC hires people who are good at writing that kind of advice - hell I don't think there are many people in RPGs who are any good at writing that kind of advice. There are huge numbers who totally incorrectly think that they are, unfortunately! And I'm sure it's one of them who'd get to write the advice section, which would (based on previous experiences, not just from WotC) be actually extremely narrow-minded, with a really limited array of ideas, some of which were clearly much more favoured than others, and none of which had much in the way of surprise, charm, or depth.

I guess what I'm saying is I want a quality book, not just a bunch of junk some dude spitballed.
 
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Coroc

Hero
...

Three Settings for the Grognards who are no longer spry,
Seven for the Realms-lords for the lore that's well-known,
Nine for Magic Players new to the die,
One for the Dungeon Master on his dark throne
In the Land Between Settings where the Space Hamsters fly.
One Setting to rule them all, One Setting to find them,
One Setting to bring them all and let the PCs travel between them.


...
haha your little poem is gold :p
 

Li Shenron

Legend
I am undecided...

I love Planescape, but I don't want it ruined by a "reboot" to the lore made to justify the publishing of a new book, and a mere rules update is probably not enough for WotC.

A generic Manual of the Planes packed with ideas for inspiration would be nice, as long as it's not the usual boring Great Wheel, which it probably would be anyway.

Maybe the best bet is Spelljammer, since I am not interested and that would mean that whatever they put out I am safe :D
 

Hexmage-EN

Adventurer
Honestly my favorite take was 4E's Astral Plane/Astral Sea, which was effectively a Planescape/Spelljammer mash-up where the gods have fleets of dominion ships, ruined fragments of other planes and god corspes serve as adventuring sites, and there's a faction called the quom who travel on world ships made from the remains of their sentient home plane in search of its pieces in an effort to restore it.

The 4E version didn't take place in the Great Wheel, but I don't think it would be difficult to just transplant most of this to 5E's Astral Plane (which is still sometimes called the Astral Sea).
 
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SkidAce

Hero
Supporter
Yeah that might be a minor factor mate lol.

And you're still describing something that's largely useless, because you're basically picking through it for additional usable info.

Why can't we have both? Because there's absolutely no possible way for WotC to do justice to what you're describing in a single book of 256 pages (which will also inevitably have a lot of pages devoted to monsters, archetypes, lineages, probably spells and so on), which is the maximum we're getting. That's one of the key reasons I'm against what you're suggesting, this sort of multiverse cookbook, because all you'll get, is a ton of quarter-arsed junk. I've seen it plenty of times before in TT RPGs - "we covered everything in minimal detail and it was useless to everyone!". In older RPGs they'd then release actual sourcebooks for all the stuff they quarter-arsed, but WotC isn't doing that.

Also, I've never, ever seen a writer who was any good at "options and guidance on how to cook up your own brew" write for WotC. Not even once. I don't think WotC hires people who are good at writing that kind of advice - hell I don't think there are many people in RPGs who are any good at writing that kind of advice. There are huge numbers who totally incorrectly think that they are, unfortunately! And I'm sure it's one of them who'd get to write the advice section, which would (based on previous experiences, not just from WotC) be actually extremely narrow-minded, with a really limited array of ideas, some of which were clearly much more favoured than others, and none of which had much in the way of surprise, charm, or depth.

I guess what I'm saying is I want a quality book, not just a bunch of junk some dude spitballed.
Take a look at Beyond Countless Doorways sometime, you might like it.
 

Take a look at Beyond Countless Doorways sometime, you might like it.
I will at some point probably, but I got an entirely one-sided and largely unreasonable feud going on with Monte Cook re: what he did to Planescape so I am disinclined to look favourably upon any planes-related products of his. That heedless vandal.

Also, four veteran Planescape designers re-united and none of them are Zeb Cook who came up with the entire setting and all the key concepts? Might as well call it a Nirvana re-union and it's the Foo Fighters. Yes that does make Monte Cook David Grohl. Where this is a good thing or a bad thing is very much a matter of perspective.
 

Mercurius

Legend
Yeah that might be a minor factor mate lol.

And you're still describing something that's largely useless, because you're basically picking through it for additional usable info.

Why can't we have both? Because there's absolutely no possible way for WotC to do justice to what you're describing in a single book of 256 pages (which will also inevitably have a lot of pages devoted to monsters, archetypes, lineages, probably spells and so on), which is the maximum we're getting. That's one of the key reasons I'm against what you're suggesting, this sort of multiverse cookbook, because all you'll get, is a ton of quarter-arsed junk. I've seen it plenty of times before in TT RPGs - "we covered everything in minimal detail and it was useless to everyone!". In older RPGs they'd then release actual sourcebooks for all the stuff they quarter-arsed, but WotC isn't doing that.
You're assuming that a single book on the planes is the maximum we're getting. I'm not so sure.

What we could see, and what I would advocate for, is a Manual of the Planes book which covers planar rules, some monsters, short descriptions of the planes, and chapters dedicated to variant cosmologies.

Then you can branch out with story arc books that give more detail for a given location or sub-setting in the planes (Avernus already did this, to some extent). They could do an adventure set in Sigil and the Outlands akin to what Tomb of Annihilation did for Chult. Or they could do a story arc involving the githyanki that explores and describes the Astral Sea and gives rules on spelljamming. In fact, I think it more likely that we see that type of book first, and then a more general MotP book shortly thereafter.

WotC clearly likes books that are multi-faceted and with different components integrated into a whole. The idea that we'd see them cover the planes in a "one and done" approach is rather odd, not to mention almost neglectful.
 

You're assuming that a single book on the planes is the maximum we're getting. I'm not so sure.
I am absolutely and completely confident that if they printed something called "Manual of the Planes", and they would call it that if it was as you describe, we would only get that one book, of 256 pages, yes.
WotC clearly likes books that are multi-faceted and with different components integrated into a whole. The idea that we'd see them cover the planes in a "one and done" approach is rather odd, not to mention almost neglectful.
I guess well that to WotC?

They did that in 3.XE. They did that in 4E.

I don't see how or why if they did an MotP, they wouldn't do that in 5E, especially as we've probably got what, until 2024 before 6E, pretty much tops. I'm sure they'd have some associated adventure, which might give some more details on a certain plane or set of planes, albeit as an aside, not as a main focus of the product.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Anyway, I voted for the Manual of the Planes over Planescape, because 1 - I prefer the toolkit approach to planes and 2 - Planescape is awesome and has such style, but it's much more exciting when you have other planes to go to.
Planescape also offered much more detailed looks at all of the planes than the Manual of the Planes ever did. If you want to go to other planes, then I would recommend getting the old 2e Planescape books or PDFs(if legally available) for the planes you want to go to. 2e lore was the best lore of any edition of D&D.
 

Oh yeah, I have a couple of the various Planescape planar guides and they are wonderful. But since that sort of sprawling product line isn't 5e's strategy, I'd rather a Manual of the Planes-style book with a chapter on Sigil than a Sigil-centric Planescape-style book.

Planescape also offered much more detailed looks at all of the planes than the Manual of the Planes ever did. If you want to go to other planes, then I would recommend getting the old 2e Planescape books or PDFs(if legally available) for the planes you want to go to. 2e lore was the best lore of any edition of D&D.
 

Mercurius

Legend
I am absolutely and completely confident that if they printed something called "Manual of the Planes", and they would call it that if it was as you describe, we would only get that one book, of 256 pages, yes.

I guess well that to WotC?

They did that in 3.XE. They did that in 4E.

I don't see how or why if they did an MotP, they wouldn't do that in 5E, especially as we've probably got what, until 2024 before 6E, pretty much tops. I'm sure they'd have some associated adventure, which might give some more details on a certain plane or set of planes, albeit as an aside, not as a main focus of the product.
If we would only get one book, how would we also get an associated adventure?

Again, they could publish a MotP and then expand upon aspects of it in further products - adventures, splats, maybe even settings.

The planes are different than other settings in that they are a "meta-setting." Theros makes sense as a one-and-done, the planes do not because they aren't only "one."

I mean, we could see an adventure in which the PCs have to go to do different D&D worlds are part of some kind of quest. The possibilities are endless.

A MotP is a kind of launching off point that opens up new doors, but it doesn't mean they have to cover every aspect of it in depth.
 

OB1

Jedi Master
What I would love to see is a CSG style Manual of the Planes, with a focus on Sigil (including a small adventure) and then go through the rest of the planes gazetteer style.

I'd much rather see Spelljammer as an AP.
 

Voadam

Legend
They did that in 3.XE. They did that in 4E.
I expect 5e to be one and done but 4e had Manual of the Planes, The Plane Above, The Plane Below, and Shadowfell: Gloomwrought and Beyond.

Depending on how you view the 4e Cosmology Underdark counts too.

The Feywild was the only 4e plane without a full expansion setting book beyond the initial 4e Manual of the Planes. Which is a shame because it had a lot of potential to be fantastic.

Even though 3e was mostly one and done on the planes as a setting book, there was Ghostwalk a 226 page setting book on a planar city of the dead, and the two hardcover Fiendish Codexes had a lot of setting elements for their respective fiends' home planes.
 



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