Cookin again

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Tonight, I cooked a tasty dish for dinner...

I chopped some green onion and put them into a shallow cassarole dish with a BUNCH of whole garlic cloves, a half-stick of unsalted butter, a splash of white wine and some black and red pepper. This was roasted in the oven at 350F.

I started a box of cavatappi pasta to cooking.

Meanwhile, in a deep, flat sided saucepan, I sautéed a whole yellow onion and a half container of diced white mushrooms in olive oil. I deglazed the pan with the same wine I used with the garlic. To that mix, I added 2 cans of low-sodium diced tomatoes, a can of low-sodium V8, 2 bay leaves, generous portions of parsley & thyme, some red & black pepper, plus a little powdered garlic and salt.

When the garlic & onion mix was nicely roasted, I turned up the saucepan's heat to get the mix bubbling. At that point, I added the garlic & onion mix and 24oz of crawfish meat to the pan. Then, into the pot went all of the pasta.

Some vigorous turning & folding of the pan's contents got the pasta thoroughly coated in the sauce.

It kinda looked like a Creole had screwed up his Hamburger Helper...

I served it- 4 heaping spoonfuls per person- with tasty crackers and slices of a nice smoked Gouda. Definitely looking forward to leftovers!
 

Kramodlog

Adventurer
With the GF I made some baked squash, sweet potato soup, rosted pork loin, baked chicken with olive and apricot, oi-sobagi and, for a simple desert, chopped mango, today. We also had brunch with some friends. Pastried and cheese for use. No mimosa. A scandale when you think about it. It was the first time I saw the GF's (hipster) friends.
 

Dioltach

Adventurer
I'm in the Dutch Caribbean, where my wife is from, and the other day I had repa di pampuna: pumpkin fritters. When I get home I'm going to make them myself, but a less sweet version with perhaps a bit of chilli pepper, then crumble up some goat's cheese and chop some coriander leaves and make a kind of quesadilla. Serve with sweet chilli sauce. Just the thought is getting me all excited.
 

Dioltach

Adventurer
Puréed, with a bit of flour and egg. They add cinnamon and raisins here and serve them with icing sugar, but I reckon a savoury version would be better.
 
I found time to bake some bread this weekend. It's not something I get to do often, but I always enjoy the results.

(Nothing fancy - a mix of white and wholemeal flour with some added wheatgerm.)
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
There is something to be said for freshly baked bread. And that is, "Yes, please!" Even the plainest of breads, when fresh from the oven, can seem a treat.

There is a Market Street grocery near us- kind of upscale- that we've been using more and more, mainly because of their bakery. I'm usually going in for roasted garlic bread (a bread with whole cloves of roasted garlic), onion rye, pretzel rolls, or one of their 2 kinds of sourdough (mild or strong), depending on availability.
 

Scott DeWar

Prof. Emeritus-Supernatural Events/Countermeasure
I'm in the Dutch Caribbean, where my wife is from, and the other day I had repa di pampuna: pumpkin fritters.
sidedish: Have you ever been to the isle off Bon Aire?

main course: My birthday is on pi day, so, my birthday meal is to be a Marie Calender's cherry pie. sans icecream. that would be too much.
The side dish is Swai filet marinaded in white wine and garlic olive oil. then I will bake at 350 over a bed of rice pilaf with pats of butter.
The veggie: Broccoli with holendaise [sp?] sauce.
 

Jan van Leyden

Adventurer
sidedish: Have you ever been to the isle off Bon Aire?

main course: My birthday is on pi day, so, my birthday meal is to be a Marie Calender's cherry pie. sans icecream. that would be too much.
The side dish is Swai filet marinaded in white wine and garlic olive oil. then I will bake at 350 over a bed of rice pilaf with pats of butter.
The veggie: Broccoli with holendaise [sp?] sauce.
Sounds good - up until mentioning Hollandaise that is. I really don't like this thick sauce which IMHO is covering all those fine tastes. Do you prepare the pilaf completely before putting it under the fish?
 

Scott DeWar

Prof. Emeritus-Supernatural Events/Countermeasure
Wow! Herr Leyden! I am honored! I was just on the pathfinder srd sight of yours just minutes ago!

If I cannot get a good cheese for this I may not make the sauce, just use butter, salt and fresh ground pepper. I usually use sea salt, but finances are grim right now.

As for the pilaf, before my coma, I could make it from scratch, but I hate to admit it but I use a box of the rice, fully made first, setting the fish on a bed of the rice.

I may have to top it off with a single malt
 

Dioltach

Adventurer
sidedish: Have you ever been to the isle off Bon Aire?
No, I'm afraid not. My wife is Yu Korsou, which for those of us who don't speak Papiementu (although I'm sure everyone here does, of course) means she's from Curacao. So basically we come here to see her family and attend other social functions in her circle. It's not always convenient, like now for instance we couldn't really take time of work, so we're living in Caribbean time and working European time.

About your single malt to go with your fish: do you have a particular whiskey in mind? If not, and if you can get hold of it, I recommend the Greenore 8yo: a very light single malt from Ireland with predominantly citrus flavours. If you want something a bit more buttery to go with the butter sauce you describe, perhaps a Redbreast 12yo? Also from Ireland, very smooth and creamy.
 

Scott DeWar

Prof. Emeritus-Supernatural Events/Countermeasure
Dewar's Scotch, but not their signature single malt. That was too expensive. its 18 yr old, I think. I keep it in my desk drawer t home.

I asked the question about where you were because I met the manager of a dive resort on Bon Aire called Captain Don's Habitat. He was in the same hospital room as I in August/Sept of 2013. He told me a lot about the Dutch Caribbean.

edit: I will let you know better stats on the Scotch
 
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Jan van Leyden

Adventurer
Wow! Herr Leyden! I am honored! I was just on the pathfinder srd sight of yours just minutes ago!
Off topic: now you have me scratching my head. What would I (or the original owner of my nick) have to do with the Pathfinder SRD? :confused:

If I cannot get a good cheese for this I may not make the sauce, just use butter, salt and fresh ground pepper. I usually use sea salt, but finances are grim right now.
Sounds much more to my taste, anyway. When working with fish I use spices sparingly in order to underline the taste of the fish, not to cover it. When trying your recipe I might use sea trout instead of swai. Guess it might play well with pilaf.

I may have to top it off with a single malt
It or yourself? :cool:

Like in a saying of Germans who try to cook like Italians. Every recipe starts with: "Take a bottle of quality wine and apply it to the cook."
 

Scott DeWar

Prof. Emeritus-Supernatural Events/Countermeasure
Jan, sorry, sir. I had you mixed up with John Reyst. please forgive me.

I do like other fish, I just do not have access to the "good stuff" like my favorite: Mahi Mahi. Neither do I have the finances at present.

I like that German saying! I like to Bar-B-Que with 2 bottles of ale. One to cook with.

My Single Malt is Dewars' Abberfeldy Distillery. It is 12 year not 18 year. Still, smoooooth as love.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Pulled off a minor miracle tonight.

I had gotten some $4 sirloins at the store, along with an array of veggies. My PLAN had been to take a couple of sirloins & cook them, serving them "chef-style"- removed from the bone and pre-sliced into nice, tender strips.

Out of town relatives showed up at other relatives' houses...then stopped by OUR house for dinner.:erm:

Well, because of the number of (un)invitees, 2 sirloins became 4. I served them with whole roasted garlic cloves & green onion in a seasoned wine/butter/lemon sauce, steamed carrots & cauliflower drizzled with a melted garlic parsley butter, and turnip roots with parsley, butter, and chicken broth.

One of the attendees also made a nice, little guacamole.

Oh yeah, leftover birthday cake (Mom just turned 69 this week), ice cream and Piehole whiskey were also consumed.

Everyone had a nice meal. The steak disappeared, of course, but so did the guacamole, half of the roasted garlic & onion mix, most of, the turnips, and @70% of the steamed veggies.

I have to say that I really enjoyed the slivered steak presentation. I have done that before with flatiron steak mixed into a stir fry, but not with just seasoned, naked steak before. It looked appetizing on the platter, and even the most carnivorous of the group ate a healthier ratio of veggies to beef.
 

Scott DeWar

Prof. Emeritus-Supernatural Events/Countermeasure
Very nice! I planned on a nice fish and rice meal for my pi day birthday meal, but I had a bit of a bike spill that left me in pain, tired and late getting home.

So, I cheated and had a DiGiorno supreme pizza pie. Two pies on Pi day.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Been enjoying Piehole Canadian flavored whiskey. It comes in Cherry, Apple and Pecan flavors. I've had all three flavors neat and on the rocks, and all three live up to the labels- they smell and taste like pie.* I have also tried them as drink mixers, with some pretty good results.

However, I've also been trying them in foods- desserts, mostly. My typical home-made ice-cream sundae is vanilla ice cream, cherries, chocolate syrup and pecans.** But- inspired by drinking days past which included my devastatingly delicious Kalhua Amaretto Vodka Chocolate Milkshakes- I decided to try the Piehole whiskeys as toppings.

As you might expect, using cherry Piehole instead of cherries or pecan Piehole instead of (or in addition to) pecans changed the sundae to a smoother texture, but the flavor was given a slightly more tangy pop.

The apple was different, though. Unlike with the others, I used the whiskey without the chocolate syrup, and I didn't use the cherries, either: just whiskey, ice cream, and pecans. Now, it was good. But even as I ate it with enjoyment, or realized within a few spoonfuls that I had missed a trick.

Instead of what I did, what I SHOULD have done was replaced the pecans with crumbled ginger snap cookies and added a dusting of cinnamon. It would have been like pie a la mode.









* Note: like every cherry-flavored liquor I've tried, there is a little aftertaste to cherry Piehole. However, its aftertaste is the mildest I've experienced so far, and it pretty much disappears when mixed.

** FWIW, because I'm mildly allergic to chocolate, I sometimes use honey, maple syrup or agave syrup as a substitute for the syrup. YUM! And pecan sandy cookies make a nice substitute for plain pecans.
 

Scott DeWar

Prof. Emeritus-Supernatural Events/Countermeasure
I am sitting at the subway on 8th in Nashville, at the table I always sit at,doing what I always do on computer, No not porn, and just as bored with life as always.
 

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