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DC Comics lays off many

MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
@LuisCarlos17f Crunchy Roll has lost a lot of value and cred in North America over the past few years. Losing the Funimation catalog, news of them altering, not just translating, the dialogues in the subs, news of them censoring content, and them giving money to western animators -to make original content for an anime focused service- at a time when many felt that they had to invest in more infrastructure have been pretty damning. There is no point for AT&T keeping a brand like that when it is already redundant. They want everybody to have an HBO Max account -which also includes anime-. If they are going to retire a redundant brand, they might as well make some money out of it.
 

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Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
When Viacom bought Parmount Communications back in the day (I was reading up a bit on Sumner Redstone), they immediately sold off a bunch of assets like Madison Square Gardens (including the Knicks and Rangers), Cablevision, and Simon and Shuster's education publishing biz.

I think that's a pretty common practice.
 


It's just amazing how so many don't. Or at least not in connection to other aspects of life.

DC sure tried to ignore it as much as they could. When their printer shut down in Quebec, they switched to one in Alabama (IIRC) and when Diamond shut down, they immediately went to Midtown and asked them to distribute. Somehow WAITING IT OUT never once occurred to them.

There are still many, many people who blame Diamond for it. As if they shut down for no reason at all.
 

Parmandur

Legend
To think not that long ago, when DC launched "The New 52", they reduced the number of titles down to their top 52 sellers.

It is like deja vu all over again, only this time the executioner's going to be doing alot more axing this time around.

The New 52 was quite a while ago now: there are people playing 5E now who weren't born yet when these was published.
 


MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
The New 52 ended in July 2016 ... four year s ago.

The main titles lasting 52 issues (+ issues 0 if you want to be technical).

As one who was there when Superman died, when Batman had his back broken, when we had Crisis On Infinite Earths, etc.... the new 52 was a moment ago.
That's a very cool story. The death of superman is the direct trigger that created the anime/manga collector industry in my country. The big news coverage the event had unveiled the existence of comic collectors to each other. They began to gather and created an infrastructure of shops, conventions and alternative markets that was later easily taken over by we weebs.
 


Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
In many ways "The Death of Superman" was the beginning of the death of American comics.

Hot take.
Having been involved in the comics industry in the retail segment since 1989 through 2006, and as a fan thereafter, I agree Superman 75 (Nov 1992) was an inflection point. But it was only one strong data point in a sea of many from that era.

I might say X-Force #1 (Aug 1991) wrapped in plastic with hundreds of thousands of copies sold and unread was an early sign of comics sold as collectibles, instead of reading material.
Or maybe the publication of Wizard (July 1991) that focused on the value of comics as objects of investment in addition to (or instead of) creative efforts to be enjoyed.
Or maybe the creation of Valiant Comics (Magnus Robot Fighter #1 May 1991) in direct competition to DC and Marvel paved the way for Image Comics and their way of doing business.

Definitely the early 90's marked the beginning of superhero comic books as collectibles qua collectible. It also marked beginning of the end of a work for hire publication system that benefited from the work of creatives but kept the profits for the corporations themselves.
So yeah, maybe it was "the beginning of the death of [one conception of] American comics". Probably a good thing overall.

If you look at graphic novels and non work for hire publishers (Dark Horse, Image, Fantagraphics, Drawn and Quarterly, etc), and the quality and breadth of genre of that work, I'd say comics are doing better than ever.
If you admire as I do the creativity still coming out in graphic fiction form, I'd say comics are doing better than ever.
If you see all the properties in the 2000's and beyond that are being made from comics, with the financial benefits accruing to those creators, I'd say comics are doing better than ever.
 

Ryujin

Adventurer
Apart from what "The Death of Superman" meant from the creative, financial, and collectible angles, it also represented the loss of any real consequence to the stories. Death was no longer death and the industry was willing to profit off such "events" in what could be called unfair ways, by the buying public.

Not that Superman hadn't died before. I remember one of the "100 Page Super Special" volumes in which Superman was killed in Kandor, because he was just as vulnerable as any other Kryptonian there. When his body was removed from the bottled city he just sprung back to life because he was invulnerable again. Complete hand-wave and not the only one from the Silver or Golden Age, however, these weren't massively advertised "events" that had people dumping major cash on something that would be similarly hand-waved. Though I've bought a few graphic novels since that time, my days of buying comics runs were over then.
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest
Apart from what "The Death of Superman" meant from the creative, financial, and collectible angles, it also represented the loss of any real consequence to the stories. Death was no longer death and the industry was willing to profit off such "events" in what could be called unfair ways, by the buying public.

That may be a case in which the buzz reached well outside the fandom community - but we had already been burned on that before when Jean Grey came back from the dead and we found that her suicide at the climax of the Dark Phoenix saga was just a phoenix-force body with her mind imprinted on it. Besides, villains were escaping certain death time and time again - so lack of consequences wasn't exactly new. It's just that the Jean Grey return was a case in which an extremely powerful story, one of the apexes of story telling in serial comic form, was undermined. It just never got the hype that the Superman story got.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Apart from what "The Death of Superman" meant from the creative, financial, and collectible angles, it also represented the loss of any real consequence to the stories. Death was no longer death and the industry was willing to profit off such "events" in what could be called unfair ways, by the buying public.

Not that Superman hadn't died before. I remember one of the "100 Page Super Special" volumes in which Superman was killed in Kandor, because he was just as vulnerable as any other Kryptonian there. When his body was removed from the bottled city he just sprung back to life because he was invulnerable again. Complete hand-wave and not the only one from the Silver or Golden Age, however, these weren't massively advertised "events" that had people dumping major cash on something that would be similarly hand-waved. Though I've bought a few graphic novels since that time, my days of buying comics runs were over then.

Hmmm, I recall being cynical about his death "sticking" even back then.

Although Gwen Stacy, Jason Todd and Barry Allen hadn't returned at that point

(but have since),


it felt like plenty of others had died and come back. Although I can't think of any other examples from 1991 or earlier off the top of my head.
 

Ryujin

Adventurer
That may be a case in which the buzz reached well outside the fandom community - but we had already been burned on that before when Jean Grey came back from the dead and we found that her suicide at the climax of the Dark Phoenix saga was just a phoenix-force body with her mind imprinted on it. Besides, villains were escaping certain death time and time again - so lack of consequences wasn't exactly new. It's just that the Jean Grey return was a case in which an extremely powerful story, one of the apexes of story telling in serial comic form, was undermined. It just never got the hype that the Superman story got.

I remember the Dark Phoenix Saga. I was still buying/reading then (had been since the mid-'60s). It wasn't billed as an "event" in the way that "The Death of Superman" was. The former was more in the vein of the previous Superman story that I related, though on a larger scale. The latter was billed as a game changer that honestly, definitely wasn't going to be yoinked back. It definitely was a game changer, though not in the way that was billed. It broke trust with the readers. True, consequence in comics wasn't a big thing. I gave evidence of such (that for some reason you didn't quote). However, the sort of crass commercialism of a manufactured "event" hadn't really been seen before. It sure became the norm, though, and rather quickly at that.
 


MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Never was a big fan of comics. Even when I was at the target age in the 70s and 80s, I found the stories to be weak sauce. But I've probably read more graphic novels in the past 10 years than in the rest of my life altogether. I started by reading some of the books I my sons were getting from the library (Bones, Amulet, etc.). Then I started reading various web comics. Comixology made it possible to cherry pick from among the best story lines from more famous properties (esp. those written by Alan Moore). But I generally find that the more famous properties are not what I enjoy the most. I enjoy discovering and reading series like Saga, Rat Queens, Over the Wall/Stonebreaker, etc.

Seems there is more great content, more easily obtained now than ever before.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Never was a big fan of comics. Even when I was at the target age in the 70s and 80s, I found the stories to be weak sauce. But I've probably read more graphic novels in the past 10 years than in the rest of my life altogether. I started by reading some of the books I my sons were getting from the library (Bones, Amulet, etc.). Then I started reading various web comics. Comixology made it possible to cherry pick from among the best story lines from more famous properties (esp. those written by Alan Moore). But I generally find that the more famous properties are not what I enjoy the most. I enjoy discovering and reading series like Saga, Rat Queens, Over the Wall/Stonebreaker, etc.

Seems there is more great content, more easily obtained now than ever before.
You are not wrong MN.

I might even say this is the second golden age of comics fiction. We can cite most of the MCU films and TV shows; some of the DCCU films, TV shows, animated shows; the rise of the graphic novel, especially in the tween space, published by major book publishers (Graphix, First Second, Random House Graphic, etc); the mainstreaming of anime and manga artistic styles; and finally the incredible proliferation of web comics. The list goes on; but suffice it to say, if you like comics style fiction then this is a great time to be alive.

But I'd say it's paradoxically also the age of the slow decline of floppy 22 page magazines. tbh, I'm not sure that's a bad thing.

Even I, who had been buying floppies for years regularly, since college - so we're talking since around 1984 or 1985 - finally cut the cord and now I only purchase graphic novel collections. I go to the comic shop once every 2 weeks now, see what's on the stands, and then ask the store to reserve volume 1 of the collected TP of the comic book. Eventually of course, it will no longer be economically feasible for the store to keep stocking the floppies of the kind of books I like, and I wont' hear of those comics any more. Which I am ok with. There are other avenues I can get info about graphic novels from. As long as the shop keeps being willing to order graphic novels for me...

(Why do I buy GNs at full price from my FLCS? well, it's the 2nd shop I worked at, and the only one still left in my town, and I have a relationship with the owner)
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Yeah, I never found the "floppies" worth the price. For series I really like, I'll subscribe on Amazon/Comixology and read on an iPad. I'm not a collector and don't find the traditional comic-book magazine format particularly appealing. Would much rather read on high-quality paper in an anthology book or read on a tablet PC.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Yeah, I never found the "floppies" worth the price. For series I really like, I'll subscribe on Amazon/Comixology and read on an iPad. I'm not a collector and don't find the traditional comic-book magazine format particularly appealing. Would much rather read on high-quality paper in an anthology book or read on a tablet PC.
Yeah, for me - I found I was just letting the floppies stack up until I had a book length qty of comics to read. So i thought why not just cut out the middle man and buy the book instead...
 

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