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D&D 5E Do you find alignment useful in any way?

Do you find alignment useful in any way?


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What's their role in the story? Do they have any motivation or goals? Because that still matters. What alignment tells me is a bit about how they might go about how they go about achieving their goals. It's not like I look at just the alignment, but alignment is a big part of it.
All that's part of the write-up, which I've been told busy DMs don't need because alignment tells them everything useful. By reading the description and learning useful information, you're obviating the need for the non-information alignment will give you.

Existing write-up:


One of many horrifying byproducts of the poorly maintained magical waste depositories, hundmithanden are descended from stray dogs tainted by magics that permeate such places. The eldritch contamination has partially twisted their bodies into a quasi-humanoid forms and given them sapience.

This sapience is truly a curse to these wretched creatures because the transformation plunges them into a world of wholly alien concepts only half-understood coupled with lingering animal instincts that no longer fit their physiology. The result is that nearly ever hundmithanden is afflicted with enough wherewithal to curse their existence, but not enough to contain they fear and rage that consumes them.

From a distance, hundmithanden resemble large dogs, usually with long, curly fur ranging from brown to rust to black. Upon closer inspection, however, one will notice that the creature's front paws are painfully elongated into something resembling humanoid hands and their rear legs are over-long and the joints don't resemble those of a normal dog's. In their early days of transfiguration, the poor beasts clumsily lope along on all fours, but as their intellect progresses, they begin to walk upright and eventually begin to cloth themselves in whatever clothing they can find and wander the streets in thin human guise.

Hundmithanden, however hardly ever manage to focus on anything besides their envy and hatred for other sapient humanoids. They fixate on a single person or type of person at the time, stalking, plotting and eventually ambushing them, strangling them in their beds or in darkened alleyways. In this way, most hundmithanden quickly become brutal and prolific serial killers, haunting cities and towns until hunted down and slain.

Their canine cunning helps them elude capture, but their continually fracturing minds slowly cause them to devolve, becoming sloppy, and less careful.

Between kills, hundmithanden live as vagrants, foraging through trash, sleeping in out of the way places and avoiding human contact. If anyone disturbs them, however, they quickly become the object of the creature's obsession—their next victim.
 

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Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
There is an argument to be made about the relevance of uncommon, and what uncommon actually means in terms of frequency, to an adventurer thats had village burnt down in a raid. But of course, that’s all table talk.
I erase them in B2 for the reasons I already outlined.
1 in 10 is rare, and that's adults. If even 1 in 10 can be of another alignment, then it's not inherent to the babies. Uncommon is significantly more than rare, so probably a third of the time.
 

"The Hundmithanden are said to have been come into being when a greedy nobleman invoked the demon lord of crime, Eldanoth, seeking to transform his kennel of prized poodles into a means for seeking out and collecting more wealth. Eldanoth transformed the nobleman's hounds and granted them grasping hands for taking whatever suited their fancy. However, the demon lord of crime stole from the dogs their loyalty to their master, and in mere moments the nobleman was killed, each hundmithanden fighting for piece's of the man's clothing and jewelry. They ransacked the manor, killing the servants and taking everything they could carry to hide within hidden caches of wealth. Since then the hundmithanden uses its hands to climb trees and buildings in remote wildernesses, jumping down onto passerby to slay them and steal anything of worth, clothes and all, with the choicest pieces worn to distract from the poodle-like creature's mange-stricken appearance.

The hundmithanden have spread far and wide, each one eager to get away from its rival crime hounds and keep them from sniffing out its wealth. On the rare occasion that they meet to reproduce, each newborn is snatched away by the grasping hands of one of the parents as soon as they have all been born, both parents seeking to claim the young and teach them to serve as underlings in their crime sprees. A young hundmithanden learns quickly that it must find and steal wealth that pleases its parent lest they be killed to serve as an example to the others. Inevitably, once the young reach maturity, the survivors fight to the death among themselves and their parent to claim the accumulated horde."

I'd write more but I've got a class to get to.
I mean, not what I was asking, but a cool piece of writing.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Not real world obviously, but in terms of arguments at the gaming table, what about the whole "orc babies" situation? Will they grow up to be evil? But you can't kill babies, right? Let's stop playing dnd and chat about this for 30 min...
Thirty minutes nothing. Goblin Slayer deals with the problem in a fraction of that time. (Content warning: the conclusion reached is to kill the goblin babies. Viewer discretion is advised.)

 


transmission89

Adventurer
1 in 10 is rare, and that's adults. If even 1 in 10 can be of another alignment, then it's not inherent to the babies. Uncommon is significantly more than rare, so probably a third of the time.
I mean, that’s a bit of a woosh to the point, but bless ya, I love the dedication to the statistical breakdown. Cheers for that 😂
 

1 in 10 is rare, and that's adults. If even 1 in 10 can be of another alignment, then it's not inherent to the babies. Uncommon is significantly more than rare, so probably a third of the time.
What edition is 1 in 10 and at 1 in 10 frequency, how is that even in the same galaxy as a good approximation of the labeled group.

That's like saying 'humans don't have red hair' and then saying it's close enough to be true.
 



Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
What edition is 1 in 10 and at 1 in 10 frequency, how is that even in the same galaxy as a good approximation of the labeled group.
Editions aren't a part of this. I'm talking about rarity and what constitutes rare and uncommon as they are commonly(hehehe) understood.
That's like saying 'humans don't have red hair' and then saying it's close enough to be true.
This has nothing to do with what I said.
 




Editions aren't a part of this. I'm talking about rarity and what constitutes rare and uncommon as they are commonly(hehehe) understood.

This has nothing to do with what I said.
1 in 10 is so far from rare that the light from rare will not reach it for 10,000 years. That's 10%, which is a LOT.

10% of Americans and 30 MILLION People.
 

transmission89

Adventurer
Have you read that particular view?

Because some things you don't demand and IMO on.
Wait, aren’t you arguing against an objective definition of good and evil?

I have indeed, it fits within his own view of his milieu. Of course, one is free to disagree with that approach in their own setting.

It’s rarely one I’ve used in my settings, though have on occasion depending on the setting.
 


Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Gnoll, goblin, drow whatever. Sapient non-human is what matters.
He already answered that in his response to me. If the DM has changed alignment so that all of a race is inherently one thing, then it makes a difference whether one is a member of that race or human. But then that would be a DM issue, not an alignment issue as the DM can do the same thing in a game with no alignment in it.
 
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