Eberron versus Multiverse

Yaarel

Adventurer
Both Eberron and Forgotten Realms are kitchen sink settings. So, it takes effort to keep the two distinct from each other.

I strongly like the diverse kinds of spirituality in Eberron, and strongly dislike the objectively-factual polytheism in Forgotten Realms.

So, it is important that the Forgotten Realms setting lacks existence in the Eberron setting.



I am combing thru the new official book, Eberron: Rising from the Last War. I want to find all the references to the Forgotten Realms specifically or to the any connections to the Multiverse generally.

The goal is to clarify precisely what the official view is, with regard to whether or not Eberron connects to the same Multiverse that Forgotten Realms is part of.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Both Eberron and Forgotten Realms are kitchen sink settings. So, it takes effort to keep the two distinct from each other.
Sorry, strongly disagree with this premise.

Eberron and FR, despite sharing some mechanical overlap such as races, are very distict in terms of lore. And in Eberron's case, that lore tightly weaves with the setting elements to make them uniquely favorful within that setting, leaving no points of overlap.
 

Yaarel

Adventurer
Unfortunately, it appears that Eberron is officially "in the D&D multiverse".

On the bright side, the world of Eberron lacks "the direct influence of the gods". The setting is the result of evolution. Polytheistic gods − including the gods of the D&D multiverse − are irrelevant to the existence of Eberron.

Page 5
"
7. D&D with a Twist. Every race, monster, spell, and magic item in the Player's Handbook, Dungeon
Master's Guide, and Monster Manual has a place somewhere in Eberron, but it might not be the place
you expect. Eberron has a unique spot in the D&D multiverse, and many familiar elements of the game
play different roles in the world. In particular, mortal creatures are products of culture and circumstances, rather than the direct influence of the gods. As a result, you can't assume that a gold dragon is good or a beholder is evil; only in the case of celestials, fends, and certain other creatures whose identity and worldview are shaped by magic (such as the curse of lycanthropy) is alignment a given.

"



I like how the religious views of Eberron are presented subjectively and agnostically:

Page 5
"Every child knows the story of ..."
"Almost every culture in the world shares this story as a myth that explains ..."
"Another tale shared across cultures describes ..."
 

gyor

Hero
Both Eberron and Forgotten Realms are kitchen sink settings. So, it takes effort to keep the two distinct from each other.

I strongly like the diverse kinds of spirituality in Eberron, and strongly dislike the objectively-factual polytheism in Forgotten Realms.

So, it is important that the Forgotten Realms setting lacks existence in the Eberron setting.



I am combing thru the new official book, Eberron: Rising from the Last War. I want to find all the references to the Forgotten Realms specifically or to the any connections to the Multiverse generally.

The goal is to clarify precisely what the official view is, with regard to whether or not Eberron connects to the same Multiverse that Forgotten Realms is part of.
The only one I can think of is Lantan being mentioned in a sidebar in the Artificer section, but I haven't gone through anything.

There is more to FR religion then just the objectively factual Polythiesm, there is the Loregiver, Adama, Path of Enlightment, and more.

And you view of these settings is extremely shallow and simplistic.
 

Yaarel

Adventurer
Eberron and FR, despite sharing some mechanical overlap such as races, are very distict in terms of lore. And in Eberron's case, that lore tightly weaves with the setting elements to make them uniquely favorful within that setting, leaving no points of overlap.
I agree Eberron and Forgotten Realms are distinct.

But the distinction between them is fragile, and becomes destroyed if Forgotten Realms lore intrudes into the Eberron setting and absorbs the Eberron setting.

Forgotten Realms is the Star Trek Borg that assimilates all D&D settings.

It is important to keep Eberron separate and whole.
 
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Beleriphon

Totally Awesome Pirate Brain
I agree Eberron and Forgotten Realms are distinct.

But the distinction between them is fragile, and becomes destroyed if Forgotten Realms lore intrudes into the Eberron setting and absorbs the Eberron setting.

Forgotten Realms is the Star Trek Borg of all D&D settings.

It is important to keep Eberron separate and whole.
As far as I can tell it is. The only references to FR are basically the artificer class and some suggestions about how it would fit in different setting. Beyond that Eberron is part of the D&D multiverse, but not affected by it. Mordenkenian's Tome of Foes mentions Eberron in passing at lesat one in a side bar.

On the whole though the setting is distinct and separate, with a bit of material about how you might make it not so should the DM choose to do that.
 

gyor

Hero
I agree Eberron and Forgotten Realms are distinct.

But the distinction between them is fragile, and becomes destroyed if Forgotten Realms lore intrudes into the Eberron setting and absorbs the Eberron setting.

Forgotten Realms is the Star Trek Borg that assimilates all D&D settings.

It is important to keep Eberron separate and whole.
I'll give you that FR can be like the Borg at times (it absord Kara Tur, parts of Spelljammer, Aasimar, Tieflings, and Genasai from Planescape, several Kingdoms from Bloodstone Pass, Desert of Desolation, the Living Gate from Nentir Vale, Gloomwrought, Dragonborn, Shifters from Eberron ect...), but they are hugely different settings, the distinctions are major, it's just in the details.
 

Yaarel

Adventurer
Unfortunately, Eberron is explicitly "part of the Great Wheel of the multiverse". This will prove to be a mistake because the gods of the multiverse factually exist. Any way, the text explicitly says the planet of Eberron is "sealed off" and "sheltered from gods". In this sense, Eberron came into existence without gods and remains without gods.

Eberron Rising, Page 228
"
PLANES OF EXISTENCE

Eberron is part of the Great Wheel of the multiverse, as described in the Player's Handbook and the Dungeon Master's Guide. At the same time, it is fundamentally apart from the rest of the Great Wheel, sealed off from the other planes even while it's encircled by its own wheeling cosmology. Eberron's unique station in the multiverse is an important aspect of the world: its planes have profound and shifting influences on the Material Plane, and it is sheltered from the influences and machinations of gods and other powers elsewhere on the Great Wheel.

The planet of Eberron is the heart of its own Material Plane.

"
 

Yaarel

Adventurer
According to Eberron lore, Eberron is the only planet that orbits its sun.

The moons that orbit Eberron are matter and exist in the material plane. Nevertheless, these physical objects exert planar influences on the planet of Eberron. But the exact relationship between the moons and these planes remains uncertain.

This planet has thirteen moons. Each moon emanates a planar influence. Sages speculate that the moons connect to the planes of the multiverse, or that the moons actually are "extensions" of these planes of the multiverse. This speculation means that the sages of Eberron are aware of the planes of the Forgotten Realms.

This Realmsification of Eberron sucks.

Eberron Rising, Page 228
"
The planet of Eberron is the heart of its own Material Plane. It is surrounded by the Ring of Siberys. Beyond this band of dragonshards, thirteen moons orbit the world. To date, no creature from Eberron has explored the moons, and none can say whether they are lifeless rocks or thriving worlds.

Some sages believe that the moons are connected to the planes, or that they might even be physical extensions of the planes, but the truth of these assertions remains unknown.

No other planets have been discovered within Eberron's Material Plane.

"
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
It is upsetting that the designers destroyed Eberron by making the Forgotten Realms polytheism factually exist.
I think you have the order of operations off... by several decades. The existence of the FR deities has been canon for pretty much the entire life of the setting. It is not a new thing that destroyed Eberron, given that this was the case for years before Eberron was even concieved.
 

Shiroiken

Adventurer
So, it is important that the Forgotten Realms setting lacks existence in the Eberron setting.
It is upsetting that the designers destroyed Eberron by making the Forgotten Realms polytheism factually exist.
Why does it matter in any way? The official setup is a meta-setting where all official settings exist in the same multi-verse, so that they can do crossover events via spelljammer and other devices if desired. However, that doesn't impact your game at all. YOUR Eberron doesn't have to have anything in it that doesn't connect to the outside multi-verse. The fact that FR has actual gods is meaningless to your campaign.

If you're upset because the concept of Eberron is ruined for you... suck it up buttercup. My setting of choice (Greyhawk) has been ripped apart, thrown in the garbage, and then set on fire... multiple times. The Realms seems to suffer from catastrophic events on such a routine basis, that most of my friends that really like FR have a hard time keeping up. The fans of Dragonlance had their entire setting AND game mechanics pulled out from under them with the Fifth Age. The fact that Eberron has to share the same existence with the other settings is a pretty minor thing at best, especially considering that the designers went out of their way to keep it from being impacted unless the DM wants it to be.
 

gyor

Hero
Unfortunately, Eberron is explicitly "part of the Great Wheel of the multiverse". This will prove to be a mistake because the gods of the multiverse factually exist. Any way, the text explicitly says the planet of Eberron is "sealed off" and "sheltered from gods". In this sense, Eberron came into existence without gods and remains without gods.

Eberron Rising, Page 228
"
PLANES OF EXISTENCE

Eberron is part of the Great Wheel of the multiverse, as described in the Player's Handbook and the Dungeon Master's Guide. At the same time, it is fundamentally apart from the rest of the Great Wheel, sealed off from the other planes even while it's encircled by its own wheeling cosmology. Eberron's unique station in the multiverse is an important aspect of the world: its planes have profound and shifting influences on the Material Plane, and it is sheltered from the influences and machinations of gods and other powers elsewhere on the Great Wheel.

The planet of Eberron is the heart of its own Material Plane.

"
That the Gods of other worlds factually exist has zero impact on Eberron, as those Gods don't invovle themselves in Eberron and it doesn't mean Eberron's Gods exist. So in practice little has changed for Eberron.
 

gyor

Hero
According to Eberron lore, Eberron is the only planet that orbits its sun.

The moons that orbit Eberron are matter and exist in the material plane. Nevertheless, these physical objects exert planar influences on the planet of Eberron. But the exact relationship between the moons and these planes remains uncertain.

This planet has thirteen moons. Each moon emanates a planar influence. Sages speculate that the moons connect to the planes of the multiverse, or that the moons actually are "extensions" of these planes of the multiverse. This speculation means that the sages of Eberron are aware of the planes of the Forgotten Realms.

This Realmsification of Eberron sucks.

Eberron Rising, Page 228
"
The planet of Eberron is the heart of its own Material Plane. It is surrounded by the Ring of Siberys. Beyond this band of dragonshards, thirteen moons orbit the world. To date, no creature from Eberron has explored the moons, and none can say whether they are lifeless rocks or thriving worlds.

Some sages believe that the moons are connected to the planes, or that they might even be physical extensions of the planes, but the truth of these assertions remains unknown.

No other planets have been discovered within Eberron's Material Plane.

"
There has been no Realmsification of Eberron.
 

Yaarel

Adventurer
The Eberron setting is f***ed up by factually existing polytheistic gods that inhabit its planes.

5e destroyed Eberron.
 

gyor

Hero
Why does it matter in any way? The official setup is a meta-setting where all official settings exist in the same multi-verse, so that they can do crossover events via spelljammer and other devices if desired. However, that doesn't impact your game at all. YOUR Eberron doesn't have to have anything in it that doesn't connect to the outside multi-verse. The fact that FR has actual gods is meaningless to your campaign.

If you're upset because the concept of Eberron is ruined for you... suck it up buttercup. My setting of choice (Greyhawk) has been ripped apart, thrown in the garbage, and then set on fire... multiple times. The Realms seems to suffer from catastrophic events on such a routine basis, that most of my friends that really like FR have a hard time keeping up. The fans of Dragonlance had their entire setting AND game mechanics pulled out from under them with the Fifth Age. The fact that Eberron has to share the same existence with the other settings is a pretty minor thing at best, especially considering that the designers went out of their way to keep it from being impacted unless the DM wants it to be.
That is an understandment. You know what they call a catasphofic event on Toril? Monday. Bawhahaha.
 

Beleriphon

Totally Awesome Pirate Brain
The multiverse of the Eberron setting is f***ed up by factually existing polytheistic gods that inhabit the planes.

5e destroyed Eberron.
You do realize the planes the moons refer to are still the 13 ones from the Orrery cosmology right?

Also, Eberron potentially being part of the multiverse doesn't change the fact that the Soverign Host or the Dark Six are not physically present somewhere.

In fact the book goes to great lengths to explain that Eberron is sealed offer from the rest of the multiverse, unless you as DM choose otherwise.
 

Yaarel

Adventurer
You do realize the planes the moons refer to are still the 13 ones from the Orrery cosmology right?
What Eberron Rising says is:

The planes factually exist. The sages of Eberron are aware of these planes.

The precise relationship between the planes (that are beyond the material plane) and the moons (that are inside the material plane) remain uncertain.

The 5e Eberron setting includes factually-existing polytheistic planes.

5e destroyed Eberron.
 

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