D&D 5E Get The Vecna Dossier Free At D&D Beyond

WotC is offering a free product which you can claim by signing into D&D Beyond, including Vecna’s 5E statistics.

The dossier includes the stat block plus a half page or so of lore. Vecna's stat block is a CR 26 undead wizard, prior to the fallen paladin (and former bodyguard to the lich) Kas's betrayal. That means he still has his hand and eye, although he is a time traveller and can appear in different worlds and eras.

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The archlich Vecna is one of the most iconic villains of Dungeons & Dragons lore. And now you can bear witness to his necromantic magic with the Vecna Dossier! Available at no cost with your D&D Beyond account, this thrilling supplement details the legacy and statistics of the Undying King himself!

This claim unlocks the contents of this promotional supplement for use with D&D Beyond, including the supplement in digital format in the game compendium and in the searchable listings, character builder, encounters, and digital sheet.

 
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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Reynard

Legend
And Beyondnis accessible.
Sure. But Beyond and also in PDF from other sources would be more accessible. I'm not sure how that is difficult to understand.

Look, I get it: WotC wants to bring people to Beyond. It's irritating that this Vecna thing is only accessible through Beyond, but it hardly matters. That doesn't mean their attitude about PDF copies of their books hasn't been backwards and dumb for years.
 


Hussar

Legend
But the pdf argument doesn’t hold any water.

You absolutely can make pdf’s of your Beyond content. Heck search for any flip plus Candlekeep Mysteries and you can see that.

So I’m really not understanding the issue here. You sign up for free, make a pdf of the free stuff you get, which is free and quite easy to do, and you have the material forever in the form you wanted.

What’s the problem here?

Yes, you have to sign up to the platform. That’s true. That’s also how marketing works. Let’s see you download EN World material without signing up. Do you also criticize EN World for that? Or any other website that does exactly the same thing? This has to be one of the weirdest arguments ever.

Hey! You! Stop giving away free content! You can only give away free content in a format I approve of ina manner I demand!

:erm:
 



There's that schadenfreude again.
I don't know if you are a German speaker. But no, this is not "Schadenfreude". No one was damaged.

If the product you want to have is free, you are the product. You gove up data or get involved.
Why should they offer free stuff?

It is rather the attitude that someone should get something for free. They put work into it. They are entitled to get something out of it. If you don't like the trade, vote with your wallet.

Also to a very earlier post because it belongs to that topic: someone posted that by 2024 everything will be subscription based. That is more than speculative. I doubt this will happen, because they burnt themself with such a concept in 4e.
The system of DnDBeyond right now seems to serve them just fine.

What I could also see is a subscription based system on top of it. And if I pay 12 Bucks instead of 6 or 7, it is still way cheaper than buying every book as a pdf or cheaper than a MMORPG account.

The essence is: some people want a hobby they don't have to pay for. This is what it boils down to. And with the current model, for a very cheap price, players can easily have that cheap hobby by uaing dndbeyond. You only need a single (cheap) account for a whole group.
All others can access all the material for free. Perfectly legal.
 

It's weird that the entire industry uses such an outdated model.
Thank you for pointing this out. Hopefully the guy below reads this. To add to this there is a reason why industry standards exist, it's to promote accessibility for as many people as possible of as many socioeconomic backgrounds as possible, and it promotes competition in the market by allowing multiple applications a set standard to they have to adhere to to ensure quality of product and ideally prevent price gouging/manipulation via market monopolies. Now, granted D&D is an IP owned by wizards and they are entitled to release their products however they wish. Just as I am entitled to dislike their chosen method of distribution.

So you seem to have a bunch of misconceptions. One you don’t need a subscription. The only thing a sub does is allow you to share content and allow you to make extra characters (and some free stuff). I don’t have a sub for example.
While you don’t get PDFs what you do get still have bookmarks, and links to most things. The Twitch thing was because D&D Beyond was originally owned by Twitch’s owner. It’s not required anymore. (You do need to link an account, but I am not sure why that bothers people). The Beyond App allows you to download your purchases and read them offline.
Thank you for bringing up precisely one of my major issues with the product. As a DM I cannot make homebrew content and share it with my players without a subscription. So no. It is not "free" as you seem to claim it to be. Free to players maybe, but definitely NOT free to DMs...you know, the major people in the hobby likely to sink money into said hobby? Every dollar I have to spend on a subscription service or rebuying the books effectively a second time is money that I can't spend on miniatures, new products, or other essentials needed to run my games.

While I fundamentally disagree with not caring about other people, I agree that the free stuff is generally offered as a bribe to get more people to sign up. I'm not sure that they would never give out free stuff in the unlikely scenario that "everyone" was signed up, but this free stuff is almost certainly there to get more people to sign up.

I don't know if I made that make any more sense or not.
With respect, this is literally textbook capitalism, especially in the technology sector. If you didn't pay for it you are the product. Them allowing limited free access to their system is precisely the same sort of thing mobile games (and dealers of certain industries we can't name here) use in order to promote a taste of their product in order to ppsychologically manipulate people into lowering their defenses to opening their wallets. Buying the books on top of the pay wall is exactly the same as microtransactions or paid DLC in games, and people have been despising that since the day they added it to gaming. Now we can debate the exact morals of said product as much as anyone wants, but I argue that principally it's the same.

I take frustration at requiring the sign up of an account for precisely the reason I mentioned above about "free" stuff. How do I know they aren't using my data behind the scenes? Why should I trust them just because of a disclaimer on a website? How can they guarantee their servers won't be hacked and are they selling that data to any 3rd party company? This all matters.

Don't underestimate the importance of maintaining your members/subscribers with that same sort of "free" stuff.
Also this. Maintaining subscribers allows one to attract ad revenue and potential companies interested in purchasing customer data and the bigger their subscriber count the the more it is worth financially.

I agree with you. On the other hand, I find that internet arguments spend (IMO) too much time discussing how people say things, and miss what people are saying. As annoying as it can be, hyperbole is a perfectly normal way of speaking. It's just that in person, you can usually tell (by tone or body language) that both the speaker and the spoken to are supposed to know that hyperbole is being used for emphasis, and not meant to be taken as literal fact. Same goes for the understatement.

In a perfect world, we'd all learn how we need to change the way we communicate in order to do it online (a very different skill set than in person) but frankly, a lot of us (not just us here, but people in general) aren't great at in-person discussions either.
Agreed with the body language. Disagree that it's a valid way of speaking, and this is coming from someone who actively has to police himself from doing it. It's a logical fallacy that quickly leads to one's arguments being disregarded and dismissed outright (albeit often from those who aren't seeking to truly engage in good faith debate in the first place).

That's fair, and I think it would be nice. I just find it odd when PDF is treated like the ultimate in game text technology...

I mean, WotC does sell PDFs through the DMsGuild, and longterm I think we may see older 5E books go there as they become Legacy content.
It's treated that way because again, not everyone can always have access to top of the line electronics or internet 24/7. Just because you can afford that doesn't mean everyone can. Pdf files are nearly universally accessible with any sort of device, do not require internet or a web browser, and again, cannot be taken away from you at any point.
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
To be honest, I do care a lot about the very many other people who have very real problems. It's just people with trivial problems of their own making that I don't care about.

I assumed that you did, really, and I sympathize. My only issue in this case would be that I wish everyone was a little more charitable to each other.

Agreed with the body language. Disagree that it's a valid way of speaking.

Disagree that any use of hyperbole for emphasis is valid? I mean, you can object to it, I suppose (a lot of people do) and spend time arguing with people, or you can, say, accept that they're sometimes going to overstate their points. (Either by accident or on purpose).

If you know that it's overstated, and they know that it's overstated, there's no sense in calling it out. (Aside from, perhaps, to acknowledge that you're both on the same page). I think we generally hold everyone to too high a standard when it comes to writing their thoughts. Professional writers can't always be clear, why should we idiot posters be any good at it?
 


I assumed that you did, really, and I sympathize. My only issue in this case would be that I wish everyone was a little more charitable to each other.



Disagree that any use of hyperbole for emphasis is valid? I mean, you can object to it, I suppose (a lot of people do) and spend time arguing with people, or you can, say, accept that they're sometimes going to overstate their points. (Either by accident or on purpose).

If you know that it's overstated, and they know that it's overstated, there's no sense in calling it out. (Aside from, perhaps, to acknowledge that you're both on the same page). I think we generally hold everyone to too high a standard when it comes to writing their thoughts. Professional writers can't always be clear, why should we idiot posters be any good at it?
The cynic in me agrees with your sentiments, though the linguistic and logical side of me points out that perhaps people should be held to a higher standard (exceptions being made, of course, being for those who are not speaking in their primary language). Proper grammar and language matters and words have actual meaning that should not be devalued. Though I've always been the sort to be quick to point out someone's being illogical, hypocritical, or contradictory in their words, even to their face. It doesn't exactly get me invited to many parties, as it were, but I won't change that ever.
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
The cynic in me agrees with your sentiments, though the linguistic and logical side of me points out that perhaps people should be held to a higher standard (exceptions being made, of course, being for those who are not speaking in their primary language). Proper grammar and language matters and words have actual meaning that should not be devalued. Though I've always been the sort to be quick to point out someone's being illogical, hypocritical, or contradictory in their words, even to their face. It doesn't exactly get me invited to many parties, as it were, but I won't change that ever.

Well, you could try, "I object to your use of hyperbole to make your point, but let's leave that behind and tackle the issue..."

On the internet we tend to get

"This problem is HUGE!"
"Nuh-uh! It's TINY!"
"No, HUGE!"
"No, TINY!"

When everyone can see that the problem is simply biggER to first person, whether it's ultimately big or not.
 







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