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5E Godzilla is coming to Magic the Gathering, will he be stomping on Waterdeep next?

Eldraine has got a lot of points to be next D&D setting. Kamigawa is too "one-shot" to be also a future setting. I guess we will see a new Wuxia setting where lots of things can be added. I guess the year before the 5th Ed of Oriental Adventures, and this with the return of the martial adepts, the classes with martial maneuvers from "Tome of Battle: Book of Nine Swords".

* Other option could be the kaijus by Toho Studios not as nPCs but like demigods. In Dark Sun there was a open door to allow some kaiju-like monster to be worshiped as totem spirits. Or summoned of divine aspects (incarnated avatars, a creatures from 3.5 Handbook of Miniatures).
 

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Coroc

Hero
You forgot it survived several thermonuclear bomb attacks (Godzilla 2014)
That being said, I do think you can do a stat block for it (and I have), you just have to be willing to go beyond the norm.
You all do know what Godzilla represents in truth?
If you ever saw a 60s Godzilla movie you might notice the trick effects are ridiculously bad even for back then. Godzilla for the Japanese is a personification of natural disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis which hit Japan frequently, but also of the atomic bombs .
For the Japanese sense of humor those 60s Godzilla films are hilariously comic and they will laugh constantly when watching one. It takes the fear and worry out of those events and helps them to get over with them.

I do not think you could stat out a natural disaster, and even the Tarrasque cannot compete.
 

dave2008

Legend
If you ever saw a 60s Godzilla movie you might notice the trick effects are ridiculously bad even for back then. Godzilla for the Japanese is a personification of natural disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis which hit Japan frequently, but also of the atomic bombs .
For the Japanese sense of humor those 60s Godzilla films are hilariously comic and they will laugh constantly when watching one. It takes the fear and worry out of those events and helps them to get over with them.
That is not exactly true.

The Showa Goji (the 60s Godzilla movies as you called them, but through '74) has actually originally a horror movie, very serious, very clearly about the atomic bomb (the american release cut some of those scenes and added some others), and technically sophisticated for the time. In fact, the first few movies were fairly serious. Later, somewhat related to the release and popularity of Gamera from another studio, Godzilla became more heroic and in some movie a bit goofy. But it would be a miss characterization to say that the character was comic relief even in the later movies. Also, in the later part of the Showa era series, godzilla pretty much lost any connection to being a representation of atomic destruction or a natural disaster.

Then, Heisei Goji ('84 - '95) Godzilla was brought back again generally in a more serious villain role, though she lost most of her connection to atomic disaster and was more a "force of nature." The Heisei series pretty much maintained its serious tone and godzilla as a villain (with humans coming up with new ways to kill it), though she did help humanity out a couple of times by defeating other monsters.

Millennium Goji ('99 - '04) is a bit all over, but it was definitely not mad for comic relief. GMK ('04) is a serious film with Godzilla being the incarnation of malice of the souls the Japanese killed during WW2.

Finally, the Reiwa Goji ('16 - ) is a serious movie mostly about governmental dysfunction (with the prime minister and his cabinet being destroyed even) and the notion that Godzilla was spawned from environmental / toxix waste (not unlike one of his enemies, Hedorah, in the Showa era).

So, to suggest that Godzilla was simply comic relief is not true. That was more an American sentiment than a Japanese one, though not completely absent from the character at times. Additionally, what Godzilla "represents" has changed many times depending on the needs of the director, studio, or just to reflect the times.

Myself, I've watched Godzilla since the '70s, been to Toho studios, and mostly watch the movies in Japanese. I may be a bit defensive about the Big G, but I can assure you that your characterization is a vast over simplification.
I do not think you could stat out a natural disaster, and even the Tarrasque cannot compete.
I think you can give Godzilla stats, in fact I've done it in 4e and 5e. It is just outside the normal limits provide by WotC.

EDIT: Also, to suggest the special effects were bad for the era is not true. Suit-mation was originally chosen because the makers of the movie thought the technique was superior to stop motion animation, being more fluid in movement with a great sense of mass. I do agree the quality dipped as the studio pumped out more and more movies. The even started using stock footage to save cost in some Showa era movies.
 
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Coroc

Hero
That is not exactly true.

The Showa Goji (the 60s Godzilla movies as you called them, but through '74) has actually originally a horror movie, very serious, very clearly about the atomic bomb (the american release cut some of those scenes and added some others), and technically sophisticated for the time. In fact, the first few movies were fairly serious. Later, somewhat related to the release and popularity of Gamera from another studio, Godzilla became more heroic and in some movie a bit goofy. But it would be a miss characterization to say that the character was comic relief even in the later movies. Also, in the later part of the Showa era series, godzilla pretty much lost any connection to being a representation of atomic destruction or a natural disaster.

Then, Heisei Goji ('84 - '95) Godzilla was brought back again generally in a more serious villain role, though she lost most of her connection to atomic disaster and was more a "force of nature." The Heisei series pretty much maintained its serious tone and godzilla as a villain (with humans coming up with new ways to kill it), though she did help humanity out a couple of times by defeating other monsters.

Millennium Goji ('99 - '04) is a bit all over, but it was definitely not mad for comic relief. GMK ('04) is a series film with Godzilla being the incarnation of malice of the souls the Japanese killed during WW2.

Finally, the Reiwa Goji ('16 - ) is a serious movie mostly about governmental dysfunction (with the prime minister and his cabinet being destroyed even) and the notion that Godzilla was spawned from environmental / toxix waste (not unlike one of his enemies, Hedorah, in the Showa era).

So, to suggest that Godzilla was simply comic relief is not true. That was more an American sentiment than a Japanese one, though not completely absent from the character at times. Additionally, what Godzilla "represents" has changed many times depending on the needs of the director, studio, or just to reflect the times.

Myself, I've watched Godzilla since the '70s, been to Toho studios, and mostly watch the movies in Japanese. I may be a bit defensive about the Big G, but I can assure you that your characterization is a vast over simplification.
I think you can give Godzilla stats, in fact I've done it in 4e and 5e. It is just outside the normal limits provide by WotC.
Well I only wrote what I once read in some press article discussing it, but your clarification seems well founded. Basically what you also confirm is the symbolic nature of Godzilla and his co-Monsters, a thing typical for Asian picture language.
 

I'm a huge Godzilla fan, but I doubt a D&D statblock for him would do him justice.

Over the course of Godzilla's film career, he has:

  • Survived in an active volcano for over a year (Godzilla vs Biollante).
  • Swam through magma from a volcanic trench in the ocean to Mt. Fuji (Godzilla and Mothra: The Battle for Earth).
  • Been capable of detonating with enough force to fry the entire atmosphere (Godzilla vs Destoroyah).
  • Survived as a disembodied heart capable of regenerating into a new body (Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack).
  • Unleashed a breath weapon capable of rapidly spreading flames in a close range (Shin Godzilla).
  • Fired rays from his mouth, spines, and his tail (Shin Godzilla).
  • Been capable of using his roar as a sonic weapon, been able to cut down mountains with pressurized air launched by his tail, increased the air temperature around him to deadly heat, and had an effective range with his breath weapon that can hit spaceships in orbit (Godzilla Netflix Trilogy).
I also like how when he heats up(goes full red glowing patches) he can emit a aura of lasers that pretty much eradicates ANY flying military vehicles that ARE NOT designed to take hits like that. (Burning Godzilla from the PS3/PS4 Godzilla game Remaster.)
 

Mythological Figures & Maleficent Monsters

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