5E Hang Time - What if you jump farther than your speed?

MechaPilot

Explorer
While working on some homebrew material I was confronted with the question of what to do when a character or monster jumps and the distance they can jump is longer than their remaining movement.

I see a few potential decisions people can make here:

1) You can't go farther than your movement. If you have no movement remaining when you're in mid jump, you fall. Example: If you can jump 40 feet and you can move 30 feet, then you can really only jump 30 feet.

2) You have to make a Strength (Athletics) check to cover the remaining distance, failure means falling when you've expended all your movement for the round.

3) The jump continues from one round to the next, with the character effectively hanging in the air until her next turn, whereupon the remainder of the jump uses up some or all of your movement.


I realize it's pretty rare for this to come up in most games (unless perhaps a PC has boots of striding and springing) but I was curious how you handle it.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
I believe the official rules are that it simply doesn't work - you can't jump further than your movement.

I handle it as the person jumping is in a "freeze-frame" in mid-air. If they get hit while in mid air, they need to make an acrobatics check or be knocked prone (and fall on their turn). I just think it's more fun and cinematic.
 

Kobold Stew

Adventurer
I'll admit I like option 3, but the Sage Advice answer is that the jump is completed in the same turn.

So, if you have a move of 30' but jump 40', you either
a. only jump 30, or
b. you jump 40, but it uses both your Move and a Dash action, and you have 20' or movement left.

Fun.

(
 
By RAW, you can't jump further than your movement in a turn. As the DM, you can easily hand-wave that aside, and it shouldn't have significant impact on the game. You could simply mark the height of the character between turns, no different than a flying creature. Remember, a round is only 6 seconds long, and all characters are acting simultaneously. Turns and initiative are constructs used to help break it down, so a character isn't "hanging" in space for any actual length of time.

As for [MENTION=6801845]Oofta[/MENTION] 's idea, while it is cinematic, I wouldn't advise it unless you grant the same problem to non-hovering flying characters. Disadvantage against a shove attack seems appropriate, however, and knocking flyer's prone is amusingly effective.
 
#1 for me.

It's another one of those theory/practice things: in theory, I prefer #3 because as [MENTION=6775477]Shiroiken[/MENTION] says the round structure is just a game structure. But in practice, enough people seem to have difficulties with #3 that it breaks the mood.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
While working on some homebrew material I was confronted with the question of what to do when a character or monster jumps and the distance they can jump is longer than their remaining movement.
EDIT: Found something that invalidated what I said. Rewriting.

--

Okay, this can happen fairly easily if someone moves then jumps - because you subtract it from your movement speed. Amusingly, the same thing is listed for swimming, which seems to invalidate swim speeds > land speeds for aquatic creatures.

Technically, your move is up when you reach the end of your move speed, leading to option #1 as the strict RAW reading.

I'd allow #3 in my game - you both have completed your move for the round as per the rules on PHB 190, and yet have not reached the distance of your jump (PHB 182). But that would be a table ruling.
 
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jaelis

Explorer
#3 seems like the most sensible way to play, but it can be abused. For instance, a Str 20 character under the effect of the jump spell can leap 24 ft straight up. So you could do something like attack a ground-based foe, move 10 ft, leap 20 feet in the air, and end your turn out of your foe's reach. So you either have to be OK with that kind of tactic, willing to just say it doesn't work, or not have players who think of that kind of thing.
 

Pauper

Explorer
I'd go with #1, making the ruling that the Jumping rules are telling you what your 'maximum' jump distance is based on your Strength score, not what your 'jump speed' is. (The rules themselves don't make that distinction, but treating the calculation as 'max jump distance' capped by move speed makes more logical sense to me than having jump be its own speed.)

--
Pauper
 

smbakeresq

Explorer
#3 seems like the most sensible way to play, but it can be abused. For instance, a Str 20 character under the effect of the jump spell can leap 24 ft straight up. So you could do something like attack a ground-based foe, move 10 ft, leap 20 feet in the air, and end your turn out of your foe's reach. So you either have to be OK with that kind of tactic, willing to just say it doesn't work, or not have players who think of that kind of thing.
Then you just ready an action to hit them as they come straight down, and I would grant a bonus if it’s a weapon you can set against a charge like a spear.
 

jaelis

Explorer
Then you just ready an action to hit them as they come straight down, and I would grant a bonus if it’s a weapon you can set against a charge like a spear.
Well, you can't ordinarily set a spear vs a charge, but maybe you've anyway houseruled that?

Certainly readying an action works, but not so well if you normally get multiple attacks. In any case, regardless of how effective it is, I guess most people would find the jumping thing insufferably cheesy.
 

smbakeresq

Explorer
Well, you can't ordinarily set a spear vs a charge, but maybe you've anyway houseruled that?

Certainly readying an action works, but not so well if you normally get multiple attacks. In any case, regardless of how effective it is, I guess most people would find the jumping thing insufferably cheesy.
You have to DM cinematically. If you were in mid air and got hit with the swing of a Frost Giants axe or a breathe weapon that has a wind-type effect (like fire from a dragon) I would have those effects push you like a batting practice fastball flys. That would stop the cheese right away.
 

jaelis

Explorer
I guess that people probably wouldn't try that kind of thing vs a giant or a dragon, its more a tactic to use against a minotaur or hezrou, where you can actually get out of their reach/range.

But it sounds like your point is, let them do it and face whatever consequences seem natural. If that works for you its a fine solution.
 

Satyrn

Visitor
3) The jump continues from one round to the next, with the character effectively hanging in the air until her next turn, whereupon the remainder of the jump uses up some or all of your movement.
This is how I'd handle it.

The character's a prime target for a shove, though!
 

smbakeresq

Explorer
It should work for everyone, the rules are not something to be slavishly adhered to against all common sense.

I get the reach range argument, but you have to go back in their reach sometime.

I don’t have the rules in front of me, but isn’t vertical jumping limited by your height and reach? I can’t recall how the jump spells interacts, no one has used it in a while.

Boots of Striding and Springing are great by the way, if your DM fills rooms with things to jump over
 

jaelis

Explorer
I don’t have the rules in front of me, but isn’t vertical jumping limited by your height and reach? I can’t recall how the jump spells interacts, no one has used it in a while.
High jump rules
When you make a high jump, you leap into the air a number of feet equal to 3 + your Strength modifier if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing high jump, you can jump only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement. In some circumstances, your GM might allow you to make a Strength (Athletics) check to jump higher than you normally can. You can extend your arms half your height above yourself during the jump. Thus, you can reach above you a distance equal to the height of the jump plus 1½ times your height.
The jump spell triples your jump distance (same as the boots).
 

Satyrn

Visitor
You have to DM cinematically. If you were in mid air and got hit with the swing of a Frost Giants axe or a breathe weapon that has a wind-type effect (like fire from a dragon) I would have those effects push you like a batting practice fastball flys. That would stop the cheese right away.
I don't consider it cheese, and wouldn't be trying to stop it from happening - but you're addressing an important point: how to handle what happens while the leaping character is "paused" in mid air.

I'd treat it the same as a flying creature getting hit between turns
 

smbakeresq

Explorer
High jump rules

The jump spell triples your jump distance (same as the boots).
I don't know I would allow the boots or spell to triple your jump height. I could see it though, I guess they are talking about a distance being vertical also. Horizontal distance is also governed by speed, that's why I let monks jump farther then others even though jump is governed by STR (not a priority for monks) as opposed to DEX. I always thought that odd because STR is a absolute score regardless of size, a 20 STR halfling who weighs 80 lbs should be able to jump further than a 20 STR dwarf who weighs 200.

I mostly just use the 4e jump rules as modified by Tormyr "The DC for Strength (Athletics) checks when a character wants to jump past their automatic distance or height should be the distance in feet for running long jumps (30 feet is DC 30) and twice the distance in feet for standing long jumps (15 feet is DC 30). Don’t forget that a character cannot jump past its remaining movement." Its just simpler that way.
 

smbakeresq

Explorer
A flying creature has control over its movement in all directions as it has a fly speed, and is thus using its normal combat movement. A creature in this case has no fly speed to me is a baseball on a tee waiting to get swatted.

Plus it would be fun to do that to a player, like in SKT with Stone Giants Fling maneuver

"Fling. The giant tries to throw a Small or Medium creature within 10 feet of it. The target must succeed on a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw or be hurled up to 60 feet horizontally in a direction of the giant's choice and land prone, taking 1d6 bludgeoning damage for every 10 feet it was thrown." In the case of this rule the giant is trying to grab a creature, so I would use something similar if the creature is just trying to bat you away. If it attacked and hit you, I would think a saving throw for half damage would be appropriate. I think I would limit it to 30' also.


I do all kind of stuff like this as a DM, anything that seems a reasonable that a creature would do. I do it both ways also, so if a PC jumps onto a table then off the table to attack someone I would give a bonus to the player for that also.
 
#3 seems like the most sensible way to play, but it can be abused. For instance, a Str 20 character under the effect of the jump spell can leap 24 ft straight up. So you could do something like attack a ground-based foe, move 10 ft, leap 20 feet in the air, and end your turn out of your foe's reach. So you either have to be OK with that kind of tactic, willing to just say it doesn't work, or not have players who think of that kind of thing.
Does the Jump spell prevent Attacks of Opportunity? If not, it's only taking away the multi-attack feature (assuming the enemy can't just move to hit another PC), which I find acceptable for the cost of a spell slot. How is this any different than someone having Fly or Levitate?
 

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