log in or register to remove this ad

 

PF2E Here's What's Coming For Pathfinder Over The Coming Year

At their (now online) convention this last weekend, Paizo revealed some information about upcoming Pathfinder 2E stuff!

Amongst other things, they announced The Abomination Vaults, their first 3-part adventure path, followed by Fists of the Ruby Phoenix (a worldwide test of martial arts and magic held every 10 years), also 3-parts.

Bestiary 2 released very recently; Bestiary 3 is now announced for March 2021! And the Lost Omens Ancestry Guide has a whole bunch of new character options for existing ancestries as well as new ancestries.


052820_Bestiary3.jpg


Screen Shot 2020-06-02 at 12.26.13 PM.png


052820_AdvancedPlayersGuide.jpg

Wayne Reynolds' cover art of the Advanced Player's Guide

052820_BeginnerBoxContent.jpg

Contents of November's Beginner Box

pathfinder-beginner-box.jpg
 
Russ Morrissey

Comments

Steel_Wind

Adventurer
Agreed though I might substitute the Moldvay Basic for the Red Box but 8 have a soft spot for B/X

I dont play PF, too crunchy, but will pick up the starter set for sure as ot is probably rules light enough to give a try.
While the price point on PF2's Beginner Box is likely higher than PF1 was on release, it is worth saying that the original PF1 Beginner Box was, hands down, the best value in RPG gaming. Period.

When initially released and purchased through Amazon, for $18.99, you got:

    • A full set of polyhedal dice;
    • A flip mat - blank and reusable on one side like all of Paizo's flip mats;
    • A generous set of Pawns (thick cardboard minis) that were so popular, they spawned an entire product line;
    • A full set of plastic bases for your pawns; and
    • [Adventure, GM rules and Player rules + character sheets.]
If you never played or looked at the rest of the PF1 Beginner Box apart from the accessories contents, it was still easily the best gaming value for your money. Even if you only ever used it for 5e.

And no, because of the high value accessories contents, there was no box for D&D -- any edition -- that could ever touch it for usefulness and value - going all the way back to the original Blue Box.
 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad

Markh3rd

Explorer
While the price point on PF2's Beginner Box is likely higher than PF1 was on release, it is worth saying that the original PF1 Beginner Box was, hands down, the best value in RPG gaming. Period.

When initially released and purchased through Amazon, for $18.99, you got:

    • A full set of polyhedal dice;
    • A flip mat - blank and reusable on one side like all of Paizo's flip mats;
    • A generous set of Pawns (thick cardboard minis) that were so popular, they spawned an entire product line;
    • A full set of plastic bases for your pawns; and
    • [Adventure, GM rules and Player rules + character sheets.]
If you never played or looked at the rest of the PF1 Beginner Box apart from the accessories contents, it was still easily the best gaming value for your money. Even if you only ever used it for 5e.

And no, because of the high value accessories contents, there was no box for D&D -- any edition -- that could ever touch it for usefulness and value - going all the way back to the original Blue Box.
Is this the same Steel wind that used to do the Pathfinder Chronicles Podcast for PF1 adventures?
 



Azgulor

Adventurer
Yes, that's me.
Just wanted to say thanks to you and the Chronicles crew! Your podcast was amazing. At the time you folks were in full swing, I was just getting back into active RPG play by introducing my kids to Pathfinder. All of the content was great, but in particular your designer interviews and your adventure reviews - both of which were led by you - really allowed me to engage with the game in a way that I couldn't with kid newbies.
 

Steel_Wind

Adventurer
Just wanted to say thanks to you and the Chronicles crew! Your podcast was amazing. At the time you folks were in full swing, I was just getting back into active RPG play by introducing my kids to Pathfinder. All of the content was great, but in particular your designer interviews and your adventure reviews - both of which were led by you - really allowed me to engage with the game in a way that I couldn't with kid newbies.
Thanks for the kind words. I am glad that the cast brought you enjoyment and some enlightenment, I hope.

It's regrettable that we stopped doing them, but in the end my partner Az was no longer able to continue with them. (He handled the technical side of the podcast.)

On the plus side, I and another from the Chronicles team are involved in developing some cool new stuff for VTT and computer enhanced tabletop play. If you pay attention, you'll see more about this in the coming months. Don't worry - I'll crow publicly about it when it's time. :)
 

Markh3rd

Explorer
I miss your reviews of adventures. I don't need all the fancy high production values..... I would just enjoy listening to your reviews again.
 


Campbell

Legend
So is the Lost Omens Ancestory Guide gonna be like the Advanced Race Guide from PF1?
It looks like we'll be seeing the same treatment that the Core/Common Ancestries got in The Lost Omens Character Guide for the Uncommon ancestries and versatile heritages released so far. We should see a fairly in depth discussion of their cultures with heritages and ancestry feats to support it. They will also be releasing more new ancestries and versatile heritages including geniekin, androids, kitsune, and sprites.

It does not look like the Core/Common ancestries will be getting any support, but between the Lost Omens Character Guide and Advanced Player's Guide there is a ton of support already.
 


Puggins

Explorer
Supporter
Indeed, it seems that there's been more player support in one year of PF2 than the entirety of 5e.
That's sorta a case of apples to oranges, honestly. 5e is definitely a lean, mean RPG machine of a game that doesn't have you making major character decisions at every level. More options would certainly be welcomed by the community (look at the response to Xanathar's), but it doesn't seem like there are major holes left to be filled.

PF2, on the other hand, is directly modeled after PF1e, which sets entirely different expectations. I own every pf2 book so far, I have subscriptions to both the rule book and lost omens line, and I'm of the opinion that we're barely past the start of pf2 support. The core rule book introduced all sorts of neat concepts (non-ancestry-centered heritages, archetypes, variable action spells) that are only now starting to bear fruit with the APG, and there are still a TON of really popular classes from PF1 that are awaiting release.

I don't want this to read like bashing PF2- I'm enjoying the game immensely after a really tepid start- I'm just saying that the "body" of PF2 has so many niches to fill that it demands a lot more support than 5e does.
 

Campbell

Legend
If I am playing Fifth Edition and let's say I play a Mountain Dwarf Ancestral Guardian Barbarian as far as character design decisions I am pretty much done, particularly if our game is not using feats. More books with more races, classes, or subclasses are not going to be useful to me. There just is not very much modular design in Fifth Edition. This is no slight by the way.

In Fifth Edition you buy the whole cow. You get one big mechanical package for a thematic element.
In Pathfinder 2 you select your cuts.

In Fifth Edition I might say Ragna is a Mountain Dwarf. That implies all sorts of things.
In Pathfinder Second Edition I might say Ragna is a Dwarf with the Ancient Blooded Dwarf Heritage and the Vengeful Hatred (Orc) feat. Further Ancestry feats will also define his Dwarf nature.

Pathfinder Second Edition is an extremely modular game (in rules and character design). Almost everything your character can do is the result of an individual choice you have made as a player. That modular design really lets you fine tune the details of your character, but is not nearly as space efficient as the less modular design in Fifth Edition.

That being said Paizo definitely does utilize much more of a deep dive approach. A lot of what has made Paizo successful historically has been what I would call Reverse Gnome Effect. At a time when Wizards was paring down on niche material Paizo doubled down on it. They have always shown a willingness to create material that might be used in like 1-5% of games if those people will absolutely love it. That kind of stuff is written all over The Lost Omens Line. They have cultivated a community based on building deep investment in their game. That person playing a Hobgoblin Cleric from Oprak who becomes a Hellknight Armiger and joins the Order of the Godclaw with mechanics behind all of that is with Paizo for life or at least that's the bet.

Michael Sayre, Organized Play Developer for Paizo has mentioned (on reddit in regards to the Humble Bundle) that the Core Rulebook is a loss leader for Paizo. Their business model could not be any further apart from Wizards of the Coast.

I'll try to find that link in the next few days.
 

Celtavian

Dragon Lord
That's sorta a case of apples to oranges, honestly. 5e is definitely a lean, mean RPG machine of a game that doesn't have you making major character decisions at every level. More options would certainly be welcomed by the community (look at the response to Xanathar's), but it doesn't seem like there are major holes left to be filled.

PF2, on the other hand, is directly modeled after PF1e, which sets entirely different expectations. I own every pf2 book so far, I have subscriptions to both the rule book and lost omens line, and I'm of the opinion that we're barely past the start of pf2 support. The core rule book introduced all sorts of neat concepts (non-ancestry-centered heritages, archetypes, variable action spells) that are only now starting to bear fruit with the APG, and there are still a TON of really popular classes from PF1 that are awaiting release.

I don't want this to read like bashing PF2- I'm enjoying the game immensely after a really tepid start- I'm just saying that the "body" of PF2 has so many niches to fill that it demands a lot more support than 5e does.
PF2 was built to be more customizable and require more system mastery much like the D20 system. It's for players looking for a deeper mechanical interface and more tactical options even if story is less of a focus.

5E was built for people that really want to focus on story over mechanics. The mechanics are super simple, but effective and easy to run. You don't have to think about the mechanics too much.

Hopefully they both find a profitable niche because I am really liking PF2. I want it to last and grow. I like that I can look forward to lvl 20 characters I get to play running an AP. I want that to stay around.
 


pogre

Hero
At their (now online) convention this last weekend, Paizo revealed some information about upcoming Pathfinder 2E stuff!

Amongst other things, they announced The Abomination Vaults, their first 3-part adventure path, ...
Has anyone seen information on what level this goes to?

I enjoyed Paizo APs in the past and love big dungeons - this might get me to try PF2.
 

CapnZapp

Legend
Has anyone seen information on what level this goes to?

I enjoyed Paizo APs in the past and love big dungeons - this might get me to try PF2.
Next spring they aren't doing a single six-part adventure path that takes you from level 1 to 20.

Instead they're doing two separate stories, in three parts each. The AP you're talking about is the low-level one, so it should end at level 10 or thereabouts. The other AP, about a martial-arts tournament(?), starts at about level 10 and ends at 20.
 

Thursday at 1pm EDT there is a Paizo announcement Seminar at GenCon Online (Paizo 2020 and beyond), with a Q&A to follow. We should get some more 2021 books announced there.
 

Ghost2020

Explorer
Supporter
Next spring they aren't doing a single six-part adventure path that takes you from level 1 to 20.

Instead they're doing two separate stories, in three parts each. The AP you're talking about is the low-level one, so it should end at level 10 or thereabouts. The other AP, about a martial-arts tournament(?), starts at about level 10 and ends at 20.

Cool!
I've wondered why they always felt the need to do a six part AP. Starfinder has done this a few times, short APs. I love the idea. I'm getting the Dungeon one for sure.
 

Sweet, the Lost Omens Ancestry Guide will have Kitsunes for Pathfinder 2E. Flipping excited. even though I'm' mostly 5E.
 

Kaodi

Adventurer
I wonder whether Kitsune will have a full tail line of feats. Like obviously you start with one, and maybe you can take a 1st level feat to get the 2nd, a 5th level feat for the 3rd, the 9th level feat will net you your 5th tail, the 13th 7 tails and the level 17 feat will make it the whole nine tails. Or maybe it will be condenses somehow.
 

NOW LIVE! 5 Plug-In Settlements for your 5E Game

Advertisement1

NOW LIVE! 5 Plug-In Settlements for your 5E Game

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top